Wood problem

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by noah013, Jan 23, 2014.

  1. noah013

    noah013 Member

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    Hey,

    I know there are some wood masters over here. I've got a question.

    We have a nice table. This table is made from very solid hard wood and has a few coats of varnish. We bought the table in a store.

    We lately discoverd two big and pretty deep scratches. Unfortunatly I have tried a lot of things, like putting some oil on it (I think that caused the spots you will see in the picture). After trying the oil thing, I used some 400 grit wet sandpaper, but that didn't helped either... The only thing happened was that the varnish lost a bit of its shine. The scratches are still there and there are some spots now.

    I really don't know what to do now, maybe you have any suggestions? Like something with toothpaste?

    Thanks, Noah013
     

  2. dolomite

    dolomite Banned

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    Hopefully wild Bill sees your thread, he's the furniture pro. I think you may have to sand it to bare wood and refinish it, not positive though.
     
  3. Ghosth

    Ghosth Over the hill but still swinging!

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    In the past I have sucessefully fixed some bad scratch's with Old English oil, in both cases the finish was pretty dark, darker than your table. A couple of treatments, then a bit of wax and a buff and they almost disappeared.

    Best of luck!
     
  4. Ravensbull

    Ravensbull New Member

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    What type of oil did you use? It looks like that soaked in and spread pretty bad... No expert here, but you may be stuck stripping the whole surface and refinishing with the oil you used then reapplying a compatible surface sealant or you may never be able to hide or blend the blotches.
     
  5. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    Oil was a bad move- it seeped under the finish. Your only hope to clear that problem without doing a full refinish is as follows-

    1. Apply some facial mud- the cosmetic for cleaning pores- generously to the scratches.
    2. Dry it thoroughly with a hair dryer at about 18" away (at least 15 minutes)
    3. Remove the facial mud with a damp cloth.
    4. Repeat again if needed.

    If that works to clear the oil, then you can move forward with a scratch repair using an almond stick/wax. If not, then refinishing the whole top will be required.

    -Wild Bill
     
  6. kohlqez

    kohlqez Accident-Prone

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    Wild Bill to the rescue!
     
  7. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    Heh.

    @ Noah- The table is made from White Oak. The problem that happened is that the cellular structure of the wood was compromised in the scratches, which is why it soaked up the oil. When you do the oil extraction I mentioned, do it twice- that's a pretty big seepage. But do the two applications immediately, one after the other. Do it once, wipe clean the mud, then in the next moment apply the fresh mud and do it again. The reason for this is that cosmetics are used to working at higher temperatures- the 90+ degrees that us humans keep going. So you want the wood to be warm, yet you also don't want said warmth to make the oil so viscous that it seeps further- which is why you start with the wood at room temperature.

    You mentioned tooth paste, which is a great compound for getting the dulled finish from the sandpaper back to shiny. That will work, of course, but the toothpaste will also get into the scratch and make it white. instead, use an automotive compounding wax for this task so as to avoid discoloration, and also do not perform this until after you have applied Almond stick to the scratch itself. You'll want to use this specifically because your table has a blonde finish and other scratch removers will be too dark. Here's a link to buy the stuff on Amazon- it's cheap.

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0006ZN9OS...vptwo=&hvqmt=e&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_3hwzh7spbk_e

    -Wild Bill
     
  8. BeMahoney

    BeMahoney Builder of things

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    My two cents:

    Wild Bill said it: That oil treatment was bad for two reasons:
    Changes in colour. And the scratch is now impregnated, won´t
    soak up WATER. But Water could do good: it could let the fibers
    of the wood SWELL, so what seems to be missing would
    "reappear".
    The other problem, the scratched lacquer, can be solved in
    two ways as well: completely remove and apply new OR
    replace partially, then sand and buff..
    ...If there was no oil, preventing the wood from being coated..

    So either live with it or sand it off (may allow the oil to evaporate,
    using warmth an time..) and lacquer OR oil and wax it..
    Hardwax oil might work good (allowing liquids that get under the
    wax to not penetrate deeply into the (oiled) wood and then
    evaporate, what lacquer will not allow it to do..)

    Be
     
  9. noah013

    noah013 Member

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    Is there an alternative for wax, a almondstick or varnish? Can I use the oil extraction and the sand it a little bit and use a little bit of toothpaste to being the shine back? Or rub a white candle over it?

    Thanks, Noah013
     
  10. BeMahoney

    BeMahoney Builder of things

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    Two answers, depending on what you try to do:

    If you want those stains to vanish: redo the finish
    (which is no witchcraft and can definitely be done in an afternoon,
    supposing not too much oil went into the wood..)

    If you want to "repair" it: live with it as it is right now!
    - Probably seal it with wax in appropriate colour (as WildBill mentioned)
    Human hearing can be cheated easily- not so the seeing!
    ANYTHING you may do to that finish will leave tracks, unless you treat
    the whole surface. (like summed up in conclusion number one above).

    Greetings,

    Be

    (Another possibility might be to re-solve the lacquer
    (If it is Nitro-Cellulose-Lacquer); the surface tension of the laquer would
    reseal the scratches, if there was no oil underneath the laquer..
    in german the product would be called "Entgräuer", designed to remove
    "grey rings" on lacquered surfaces, resulting from steam/hot liquids..)
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2014