Wood drying - chart

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by stej, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. stej

    stej New Member

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    At beginning I used microwave oven quite a lot. However, there were 2 moments that forced me to think about natural drying.<br><br>First - I have a big apple fork. I microwaved it many many times and weighed very after every session. When the weight drops were really small, I stopped. After serveral days I expected th weight decrease at least a little bit. But I was very surprised that the fork sucked 30gramms from air moisture! That's why I think that microwaving until there is some moisture in a plastic bag is not good for the fork.<br><br>Second - I microwaved some hawthorn forks and when I used rasp on them it felt weird. The wood was somehow more soft, hard to describe it. But the feeling wasn't good.<br><br>That's why I leave my forks naturally dry (either with bark or without.. it depends; and I sometimes experiment) and measure their weight quite often.<br>What I would like to show you is a difference how hawthorn dries. <a href="http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=41&u=17729622" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img src="http://i42.servimg.com/u/f42/17/72/96/22/wooddr10.png" border="0" alt=""></a><br><br>1) look at the hawthorns at the image. There are 3 forks. One barked off, second with bark and third (at the bottom, green) has glued ends so it will dry very slowly. That was an experiment. You can see how quickly the barked off looses its weight - it's 1/4 of its weight in a week! And there are no cracks. Which is unbelievable.<br><br>2) there is an ash fork (yellow). The drop on the right is caused by debarking. You can see that it started loosing weight faster<br><br>3) mirabelle forks. Both with bark, one of them is glued.<br><br>I hope I inspired some of you to try natural drying <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2">
     
  2. stej

    stej New Member

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    One more picture: <br><br><a href="http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=43&u=17729622" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img src="http://i42.servimg.com/u/f42/17/72/96/22/wooddr12.png" border="0" alt=""></a><br><br>Just see and compare..<br><br>The dogwood or what is that (I don't know exactly) is barked off. It seems that it dries very quickly, the same way as hawthorn barked off (first pic). Plum and apple dries quickly as well.<br>On the other hand oak is much slower..
     

  3. pasquale

    pasquale Member

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    I let my natural dry normal, but when I have some time I put them 1 or 2 times in the microwave. So I use a combination of both methods.<br>
     
  4. stej

    stej New Member

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    Picture that shows how apple takes wood from air after it is microwaved too much... So, take care when microwaving.. <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"><br><br><a href="http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=48&u=17729622" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img src="http://i42.servimg.com/u/f42/17/72/96/22/wooddr13.png" border="0" alt=""></a>
     
  5. DaveSteve

    DaveSteve New Member

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    Interesting. Thanks for sharing.
     
  6. onnod

    onnod Im from Holland, isnt that weird?

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    interesting indeed
     
  7. Lars

    Lars The Evil Genious

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    <div>ohh<br>wood from air <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_lol.gif" alt="Laughing" longdesc="7"><img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15">
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    <br>hmm nice slingshot!<br>maybe needs some sanding and oiling <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_lol.gif" alt="Laughing" longdesc="7"><br><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/selfmademilitary" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">my Channel . . . . . Selfmademilitary</a><br><a href="http://slingshotforum.forumieren.com/" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">My Forum</a>
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  8. Awesome info thank you! I will remember to treat and seal any forks that will be sitting for a while before use.
     
  9. stej

    stej New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Lars wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">ohh<br>wood from air <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_lol.gif" alt="Laughing" longdesc="7"><img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15">
    </td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br><br>Of course.. wood from air. And sometimes it takes also water/moisture from air <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15"><br>I hope everybody understands, so I wont correct it.<br><br></span><table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>mikehunt042084 wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">Awesome info thank you! I will remember to treat and seal any forks that will be sitting for a while before use.</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br><br>The only question is: do we have enough time and patience to just wait until the fork is dry? <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15"> I just wanted to point out that although microwave might significantly speed up the process, there might be some disadvantages or hidden gotchas.. And we have to count with that.</span>
     
  10. That's why I said any forks that would be sitting. I still have to go cut some forks and make some naturals (need to have better workspace than the kitchen or I'll get scalped lol) but there are so many trees that need trimming (we just had a bad fire and the forest service trimmed but left it all laying around too) and when I actually get to start working there won't be too many sitting around I think no matter how many I find lol.
     
  11. stej

    stej New Member

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    Hm, kitchen.. My wife would be veery angry if she saw me in the kitchen with a fork and rasp <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15">
     
  12. zwillie

    zwillie New Member

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    Hi,<br>when I dry wood I paint the cut surface to prevent dry cracks.<br>With little pieces of wood your method works, but with bigger blocks the drying needs time.<br>I sometimes dry wood in our laboratory drying oven this works well for small parts.<br>zwillie
     
  13. odd you would speak of those little lab ovens, I was actually about to ask about them lol. I have to get one for my shop when I get it together for hardening molds for casting and for hardening knives. (I have my eyes on a model that goes from like 100 degree farenheight up to a few thousand degrees.) I was curious how it would work for wood but you already answered my question. Thank you much!
     
  14. zwillie

    zwillie New Member

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    <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_eek.gif" alt="Shocked" longdesc="5"><br>I don´t mean the oven like a potter`s kiln!!!!!!!!<br><br>We have an oven like <a href="http://www.pris.co.za/MyImages/LaboratoryDryingOven02.jpg" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">this</a> one.
     
  15. Oh sorry I realized my post may have been confusing. It is actually one for each purpose lol. And that is exactly the type of "oven" I meant. They have a model on mcmaster.com with vents for the wax to drain for doing casting molds (not for actually casting just the molds)
     
  16. ABH

    ABH New Member

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    interesting information, usefull data!