Unknown natural

Discussion in 'Show off your homemades!' started by 4foruglenncoco, Dec 22, 2013.

  1. 4foruglenncoco

    4foruglenncoco Member

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    I made this and when putting on the finish the grain looks amazing, there r nice lines many color changes, (I thought in was a flaw I made but it wasn't) it used to be white colored then I put in a flax seed oil finish(which was expensive) and it payed off.
    ImageUploadedBySlingshot Forum1387766482.375654.jpg ImageUploadedBySlingshot Forum1387766504.388328.jpg ImageUploadedBySlingshot Forum1387766522.539384.jpg
     
  2. Bushmaster

    Bushmaster New Member

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    Waves gravy! Ver nice organic shape preserved! A sensitive approach! It all came together! Am I gushing? Yeah!
     

  3. 4foruglenncoco

    4foruglenncoco Member

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    Thank u
     
  4. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    Sweet colors and grain! Can you tell us where the fork came from so we can perhaps identify the species of wood?

    -Wild Bill
     
  5. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    Also, how did it handle being tooled? Was it easy and forgiving or hard and difficult to cut into? I'm assuming it's a So. Cal wood but there's a lot of possibilities for blonde wood out there.

    -Wild Bill
     
  6. 4foruglenncoco

    4foruglenncoco Member

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    It was given to me I had a thread u posted on when I asking what it was, I don't have access to any of my tools except for my dremel so I used the dremel but it was hard
     
  7. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    You know, this just might be Loquat. White wood, So cal, took an oil with heavy graining, very hard (hard like cherry, I hope) to work with... Yeah, you may be dealing with loquat. It is a fruit tree, related to the kumquat and fig, which can be found in So Cal as it is a tree that handles drier climates well. Kumquat is much darker naturally, and fig has a green tint, so of the three this should be Loquat.

    Such trees are not common, so consider yourself blessed to have such a fork. Being a fruit tree, the wood is very strong, dense and resistant to torsion. Happy slinging with this beauty!

    -Wild Bill
     
  8. 4foruglenncoco

    4foruglenncoco Member

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    Before moving to la I lived in Singapore and I loved loquats, such a delicacy, but it is not a loquat tree mostly because I have a loquat tree in my backyard that my dad bought and the bark is COMPLETELY different.
     
  9. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    Bummer. The fork had me fooled then-the grain is consistent with it and, as you explained, it was hard like a fruit tree. This fork is absolutely a fruit tree and the only other one that fits all of your parameters and can be found in So Cal is an Alberta Peach- and that wood is very rare. Navel oranges are soft woods that wouldn't give your Dremel any trouble and Crab Apple trees are found only in high altitudes- 4000+. If I'm wrong, then I'm wrong- I've been wrong before. But if this isn't a Loquat fork, then my only other guess is a dwarf Alberta peach, which is extremely rare. But if this fork came from the more mountainous regions (Palomar, Oak Glen, etc) then it might be apple after all. Lemme know.

    -Wild Bill
     
  10. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    That's a nice fork you've done there 4foruglenncoco. I don't think I could identify woods like Bill can, he's got so much more experience with wood types. But I would agree with him that it certainly seems to show the essence of a fruit or nut wood. I've done several fruit and nut naturals and that look similar once they were finished. Nice work on that one.
     
  11. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    Okay, I feel stupid now. Everyone repeat after me- Wild Bill, You got stupid!

    Once I took the time to rattle my brain for common white-wooded trees that fruit in so cal and have that type of grain, I came up with only two candidates. Loquat, and Avocado. And, after you vehemently denied the whole Loquat option, I first licked my pride and then took another look... and yes, this is probably Avocado. I think that what threw me is the Flax seed oil finish you did, which would actually diminish the coloration of natural avocado and as such I didn't catch it at the beginning. Avocado grain is typically far more drastic than what is pictured above, but Avocado isn't usually finished with oil because the wood is naturally oily and doesn't take well to an oiling- waxing is what you do with Avocado. So I'll put my final bet (for whatever it's worth) that you have an Avocado fork. And a mighty fine shooter that is well crafted!

    -Wild Bill
     
  12. Brazilviking

    Brazilviking Thread Hijacker

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    Nice grain indeed! I have lots of unknown trees surrounding me here, with good strong wood....it is sad when you don't know anything about it!
     
  13. BeMahoney

    BeMahoney Builder of things

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    Really nice!

    Good work on that one!
    Beautiful wood!

    I like that slingshot you built!

    Greetings, thanks for posting!

    Be