TRAGEDY! *warning: not for faint of heart*

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by kohlqez, Dec 16, 2013.

  1. kohlqez

    kohlqez Accident-Prone

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    I spent this past weekend almost entirely in my garage working on my latest slingshot. It was a full size Eagle template, made from two pieces of poplar on either side of a red oak core. At least 13 hours were spent on the gluing, sawing, rasping, and filing alone, but unfortunately that is as far as it got. When putting in the first of two pins, the entire slingshot broke into two pieces. Curses and, I am unashamed to admit, a few tears followed. I tried to fix it with glue but it was already gone...
    If anyone has any ideas on how to fix, or at least salvage, my project I'd love to hear them..
     

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    Last edited: Dec 16, 2013
  2. Lars

    Lars The Evil Genious

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    you have not crossed the grains to 90 degrees
    that´s the problem
    oh and poplar is too weak i think
     

  3. man that sucks !
    looks like a goner sorry
    you could pin the two together but then the slingshot would break in another place because the grain is not crossed
     
  4. BeMahoney

    BeMahoney Builder of things

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    probably

    Hey Kohlquez,

    don´t worry!
    My first impression: It´s better to lose a fork than an eye!
    Second thought: This can be fixed easily! Suggesting:
    apply woodglue (or epoxy) to where it broke.
    Let the glue cure. Then drill a hole, starting at the bottom
    of the handle, passing through the whole handle, ending in
    the basis of the fork. (diameter approx. 6, better 8 mm.)
    Next step will be to glue into the hole a wooden dowel pin - best
    would be beech, dunno if you can buy those at your place?
    Let it cure again, done fixing :)

    (All in case the handle is not too weak..)

    Greetings,

    Be
     
  5. Faxi

    Faxi Banned

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    This Fork has gone over the well rubbered Rainbowbridge.:rolleyes:
    Life will go on :cool:
     
  6. kohlqez

    kohlqez Accident-Prone

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    Bummer, I guess it's off to a new project with me then....
     
  7. flicks

    flicks ...lost in the woods....

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    I am with Lars, TAOW and BeM - the grain is not crossed and the pin weakened it in addition. The crack happened fortunately now and not whilst shooting. I won't fix it, cuz the next crack will be on the fork. Man, drink a beer, be happy that nothing seriously happened and build the next one.... :)
     

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  8. LW

    LW New Member

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    Sorry to see this, but you put the hole (pin) at the weakest part of the handle. Thos things can happen… :(

    You could try to fix that with 2k epoxy, but I guess that will not last long!?

    Be glad that the handle was broken during the building process and not when you shot it!
     
  9. Brazilviking

    Brazilviking Thread Hijacker

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    I knew you would say that!

    Aways cross the grain.

    Aways cross the grain!
    Did I mention crossing the grain?
     
  10. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    It happens...to everyone - as Bill Clinton would say "I feel your pain". As others have already pointed out, it's very good this happened now, and not when you were in mid-draw. One option, beyond crossing the grain that has been mentioned is to laminate your pieces to an aluminum core. That will give you strength as well - and I think they look pretty cool too.

    Just remember what the old slingshot master said on his way to the emergency room: "Owww! My eye"

    Wait, wrong quote...."Cross the F***ing grain!" Give him a break, he was in a lot of pain ;)
     
  11. Achso_42

    Achso_42 Senior Member

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    :(
    I'd say put it on the wall of your working place.

    If you want to repair it anyway, you could try to drill lots of holes to put nails through.
    That way it could still hold weak bands.
     
  12. Lacumo

    Lacumo Member

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    I can only echo the wisdom above. Write this one off to the design flaw of not crossing the grains and don’t try to repair it--this frame will only break again. Give the pieces a good Viking Funeral--put them in a charcoal grill or fireplace, douse them well with charcoal lighter fluid, light them and sing some Druid madrigals while they burn. Next time, cross the grains and don’t use Poplar.
     
  13. kohlqez

    kohlqez Accident-Prone

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    Well I guess that's that... I learn something new everyday here, I actually had the grains crossed in my first "draft" but I messed up that piece and completely forgot about it after.
    Is poplar really that weak? And even if it is it the 1" piece of oak should have been enough by itself (if I remembered to cross the grain) right? And is the important thing actually crossing the grain or is it having a piece that is vertical? Like is it ok to have 2 vertical pieces instead of one vertical one horizontal?
     
  14. Slagskimmer Mike

    Slagskimmer Mike thinks TBG smells better than roses

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    You want the best of both worlds. The long grain strands are for strong handle and forks, and the cross layers are to tie it together so it won't split long wise from crotch to handle.

    Be safe, but don't fret--the next one is always even better.

    If you are a die hard never say die salvage fanatic its maybe not too late to add that aluminum core--but less work and prettier ss to start fresh.
     
  15. Lars

    Lars The Evil Genious

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    oh the strongest board should be grained from up to down and not horizontal ;)
    yes polpar is weak you can even dent it with your fingernail
    you could use an multiplex ( i dont know the english word at the moment) with 9mm thickness as an core and then put two halvs of red oak and then poplar (even now all crossed for best efectivity)
    you can even use only the multiplex (ah now i know it Plywood) with 9mm thickness
     
  16. SpraveRocks

    SpraveRocks Junior Member

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    hi guys, im quite new to wood working. what does it mean to "cross the grain"? could some one kindly explain please! (i only know the grain lines have to be vertical in forks duh) Thanks in advance, happy new year. Also, is there a beginner woodwork 101 thread or anything similar? im quite confused about gluing and finishing wood. haha thanks