Speed of Slingshot vs Slingshot Rifle

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by tweetlogist, May 10, 2013.

  1. tweetlogist

    tweetlogist New Member

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    So ... a slingshot rifle is easier to aim, at least for a n00b like me. It can be more powerful as you can draw it with two hands (or even a winch). But ... is it *faster* than a regular slingshot?? From the videos I've seen, the main way to make a fast slingshot is extreme tapered bands. Those claiming the fastest speeds all seem to use regular slingshots with tapered or half-doubled bands. Is there some other way a rifle or x-bow design can increase speed? I'm looking to build a *fast* design, so any advice from those with experience is appreciated!
     
  2. onnod

    onnod Im from Holland, isnt that weird?

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    with a x-bow it just takes too mich time to load and shoot, in this time the rubber cools and power is lost, also your x-bow needs to be ridiculesly long, so i don't think so
     

  3. BrPio

    BrPio .

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    I tend to make more rifle and pistol typs rather than conventional slingshots. I'v found making use of roller bearings makes for a very fast slinggun without a crazy long barrel (just check out Joerges bullpup slingshot). Personally I don't use a wood dowel (which does work well) but rather metal, you can order bearings on e-bay for about $3USD or just simple 1/2in ID rigged copper over a 1/4in bolt with a few drops of graphite in between. Also as far as the speed, it just depends on how heavy ammo you want to shoot. As far as loading, I have many that are fast load, you just need one hand. A lot is experimenting. And on a fun side note. I have access to a law enforcement/military shooting range ,we have compared them against regular firearms, It's funny to see a guy who was just firing an AR-14 get more excited about shooting a slingshot rifle. Snapshot_20130504_2.JPG
     
  4. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    Handheld slingshots are hard to beat. If you can do full butterfly AND hit with it, everything is possible. Record breaking speed with light bullets, 100 Joule shots with big steel and lead balls...

    Very few of my slingshot crossbows can rival the performance of a good handheld conventional slingshot, handled by a good shooter. My 2 meters long winch operated model does 170 Joules with 25mm steel balls, and the big cannon does 1000 Joules with boule balls. That's about it.

    BUT slingshot crossbows have many advantages.

    - Accuracy: Add a scope and then hitting is a piece of cake.
    - Safety: A crossbow CAN be a lot more safe than a handheld. No RTS shots, no handslaps.
    - Bullet shape: Crossbows can shoot just about any kind of projectile, as I have proven many times.
    - Reloading time: My pump guns have reliable reloading times under two seconds.
    - Fun: At least to me, nothing beats pulling the trigger on a weapon I made myself, at home.

    There is probably more, but this list is good enough to get you started.
     
  5. tweetlogist

    tweetlogist New Member

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    I see, that gives me a feel for the difference. Thanks for the graphite powder lubricant idea, and especially @JoergS for the energy figures.
     
  6. tweetlogist

    tweetlogist New Member

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    @BrPio by the way, your rifle looks great! But why are the band anchor points near the front of the rifle when you could have more band length if they were further back? I also wondered this about @JoergS's bulpup design? Would it be too hard to draw? Perhaps you could draw it with a foot brace?
     
  7. BrPio

    BrPio .

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    the band anchor points are further back than it seems in the pic, It is just a bad camera angle, what is in the pic is a 12in pistol. Too I'ts funny you should mention the band anchor points. Today I was working on rebuilding them so the anchor points are further back to add more length to the barrel.