some yew forks

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by onnod, May 15, 2013.

  1. onnod

    onnod Im from Holland, isnt that weird?

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    hey guys,

    i found a nice yew tree walking home from school, which had some nice forks on it, so after homework i took my new homemade saw(a recipro saw blade in a wooden handle) and went to saw some forks. these are just three from about 7 or 8 forks on there, but i'll let those grow on to become bigger :rolleyes:
     

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  2. Achso_42

    Achso_42 Senior Member

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    Nice!

    Got a yew tree in the garden, so I will have some forks soon:)
     

  3. Saderath

    Saderath Senior Member

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  4. stej

    stej New Member

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    I have some yew forks as well, still drying. Personally I would be careful to cut wood during spring/summer. Some people reported that they crack more easily during drying than forks harvested during winter. Autumn might be good as well imho. Just other point .. :)
     
  5. RBurke83

    RBurke83 New Member

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    Is yew a type of laurel? That looks a lot like some mountain laurel trees in my backyard.
     
  6. Slagskimmer Mike

    Slagskimmer Mike thinks TBG smells better than roses

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    That's a handsome saw, good idea. It looks nice and aggressive.

    What material is the sheath, and how was it made?
     
  7. Thistle

    Thistle RESIGNED

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    I didn't know this, Stej. Thanks for the heads-up! Very helpful for me to learn and to keep in mind. So it is best that I wait until this Fall to collect forks for someone.

    But to be honest, it's always spring/summer where I live. [​IMG]
     
  8. Thistle

    Thistle RESIGNED

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    Yew is beatuiful, O. I can't wait to see what becomes of your natural forks. Impressive job on the homemade saw too!
     
  9. Bullybreeder

    Bullybreeder Banned

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    While working on those you must were a gas mask becasuse sawdust from yew is highl toxic
     
  10. onnod

    onnod Im from Holland, isnt that weird?

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    i didn't know that, but they're cut anyway now so we'll see

    thanks, the sheath is made from the plastic cover around a binder, i heated it up and slowly bended it, after that i used a soldering iron to poke the holes and melt the sides together
     
  11. Loei

    Loei New Member

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    I saw some slingshots made from fresh wood here, and was quite surprised, because a piece of wood is supposed to dry for a year before being usable. It may depend on the type of wood, but it has to lose a lot of its water.

    As far as I know, if it's too fresh, it can crack, shrink, or change a bit its shape.

    However, it may not be a problem for slingshots, and I guess it's very cool to build one like that...:)
     
  12. Bullybreeder

    Bullybreeder Banned

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    no dude when you sand them the dust is a thin powder and it can get into your lungs. When your sawing none realy gets into your lungs because the are ant sized chunks.
     
  13. Ravensbull

    Ravensbull New Member

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    Hi guys. I'm new to the forum but I had to chime in on this thread because it is completely ironic! I just pruned my mothers front hedge and harvested several workable forks yesterday. Tonight I was trying to determine the exact species and came across the toxicity warnings also... Very stout and solid but is it worth the hazards..?!
     
  14. stej

    stej New Member

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    I read that everything from yew is toxic, so one has to really take care. Dust mask is a must.

    From what I have seen so far, it's really worth the hazards. The wood is very pretty after the finish, or better unique. Maybe google yew a slingshot and I hope you will find some pics that persuade you :)
     
  15. Ravensbull

    Ravensbull New Member

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    Yeah I agree, it has beautiful inner sap/heart wood! Not too sure about cracking but is it a bad idea to peel it green but cut over length and microwave (junk unit for such use) for short cycles? I just tried a scrap piece and it bled LOTS of pink/purple moisture. Even burnt the center a bit but no cracking..
     
  16. stej

    stej New Member

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    My friend told me that yew has little cracks or none. That drying yew is piece of cake :) Anyway, I have still no experience with this, so I don't know.
    If you would like to speed it up, ok, then microwave. But also microwaving should be slow..
     
  17. Ravensbull

    Ravensbull New Member

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    Right, it seems to have a very stable grain. Even the old dead in stubs of previous pruning are barely cracked at the end grain. I'm in no rush for a shooter though,just trying to "spirit" this stuff
    a bit is all. One fork here is a very close identical to Onnod's largest (sacrificing any handle on the top mini). I'm thinking "V" frame with a "feed it anything band/pouch!"
     
  18. Ravensbull

    Ravensbull New Member

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    Also to Onnod, very snazzy saw!!! Looking forward to seeing what you come up with out of those cuts too! If I move on mine and figure out how to post pics I'll put them up
     
  19. G_Y

    G_Y aiming the less

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    Two days ago i foud a dead piece of rosewood or blackberry wood where a tree was fallen down years ago. So the rosewood is dry enough, i thought and formed the fork yesterday. After this (no mask) a slight could was gone, no joke.

    But i also knew a man who worked in sawing wood for decades without a mask who was not able to work anymore because the wood-dust in his lungs...
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2013
  20. Tysonspapa

    Tysonspapa New Member

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    Nice. Yes forks should be harvested in winter, because the wood is a lot more dry. If there would be as much water in the wood as in Summer, the trees would crack because the water would freeze.