Snaring problem can any traper can help?)

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by ABH1, Oct 29, 2013.

  1. ABH1

    ABH1 Member

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    honestly, im just totally confused about the idea of snaring (rabbits), im a newbie in this but, there is so much alternative information which differs so much from others, like for example, that you should mask your smell or not, that the loop should be 5-6" from the ground or 4 fingers, this is confusing and frustating!!
    Can someone who has prooven success with this tricky business help please?? Thankyou
     
  2. dolomite

    dolomite Banned

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    Call Dave Canterbury
     

  3. Brazilviking

    Brazilviking Thread Hijacker

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    Call Allan Quatermain.
     
  4. dolomite

    dolomite Banned

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    Maybe bear grylls?
     
  5. Brazilviking

    Brazilviking Thread Hijacker

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    Or that Kraven dude, spiderman enemy?
     

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  6. OldSpook

    OldSpook Banned

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    It is unfortunate that so many would have so much fun at your expense. Four fingers is not six inches, but four fingers is about right. You are talking rabbits so it is harder than coyotes or foxes. Rabbits will have trails and they will follow them. If you live in country where snow covers the ground during winter those trails will become obvious after the first snow. If you don't you will have to discover the signs that rabbits leave when they make trails in grass or hedge. You can still figure them out.

    Probably the most important thing about a snare is the ability of your noose to lock. If your noose releases your prey will get away. If your noose locks your prey will be in your trap when you visit it again. So make sure that your snares are lock tight snares, that they do not release your prey.
     
  7. Haze

    Haze New Member

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    Firstly, I agree with Spook on the height of the snare. Second, rabbits like to bolt under low logs and between things like a tree trunk and a stone, so those sorts of places work well so long as the trail is there. The other thing is that if you go to check you snares and find a bunny setting near one, it will shoot straight into one if you scare it, if the snare is set in one of those places.

    I used to use garden wire - about .8mm, and that will lock.
     
  8. dolomite

    dolomite Banned

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    you gotta worry about the rabbit taking a wrong turn in albacoikie, it sucks but that can happen.
     
  9. Haze

    Haze New Member

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    By garden wire, I meant the wire that stays in shape when bent, rather than pre-straightened wire, which will spring open. Don't have many rabbits in these here parts tho...lol.

    As some point I am planning to buy a block of rural semi-cleared land out of town so I can do this sort of stuff, along with making potato cannons and rockets, blowgun shooting and all the other fun things that suburbia does not offer.
     
  10. dolomite

    dolomite Banned

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    Just don't give the rabbit a shot of whiskey, Roger showed us what a piss drunk rabbit can do. Pppplease Eddie!
     
  11. Haze

    Haze New Member

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    Now that's something I could do with after the patents thread. I would go Glen Morangie (the 18 yr old stuff).
     
  12. dolomite

    dolomite Banned

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  13. ABH1

    ABH1 Member

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    Yeah, I know that 6 inches is way bigger tan 4 fingers, that was one reasons I was confused, as some people say that the idea of measuring in fingers is a lie, also I've read that the snare itself should be from 6,5" by 7,5" as allegedly people seem to forget wiskers and the erected long ears of the rabbit, also that you should set traps always in the middle of short "beats", is that right? Were I live you can only find partridges, rabbits and something similar to a deer and a goat we call "muflon" but is fairly rare. Thankyou very much for helping.