Slingshot finishing (optical/water resistence)

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by TheVengo_111, Jun 20, 2012.

  1. TheVengo_111

    TheVengo_111 New Member

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    Hi guys!<br><br>Recently I completed a slingshot in a hammerhead design exclusively made out of plywood.<br><br>After I sanded the wood with fine 180 grain sandpaper, I treated the slingshot with four layers of teak oil (for outdoor furniture) for water repellance and general resistance.<br><br>Here's the problem: After the treatment the wood got a nice colour, but also kind of a rough surface and strangely coloured spots.<br><br>Do any of you please have some advice to achieve a good matt finish for my birch plywood slingshot?<br><br>Thanks a lot in advance people!<br>Vengo
     
  2. onnod

    onnod Im from Holland, isnt that weird?

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    i would say, go higher to like 800 grit and than wet it, sand again, and than you oil.<br>this will almost completely get rid of the rough surface, i don't know whats with the spots
     

  3. TheVengo_111

    TheVengo_111 New Member

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    Thanks onnod!<br><br>I was also suspecting, that the sanding was yet too rough although it felt really smooth on the skin.<br><br>When you say wetting it, do you mean rubbing the wood with a soaked towel and let it dry afterwards or apply the oil directly after that?<br><br>Yet another thing: (Sorry to go hard on you <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"> When you oil it, do you completely soak and submerge the slingshot in oil for a time or just brush paint it?<br><br>Thanks for your help!! <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1">
     
  4. onnod

    onnod Im from Holland, isnt that weird?

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    With wetting i mean making your hand wet and then touching the slingshot, there is a lot of info on thw finishing tread,i think that will answer all your questions
     
  5. Werdna8

    Werdna8 New Member

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    From what i have read on some woodworking fourms the color spots usualy come from using an oil based stain that contains pigments (tiny solid insoluble colored particals). The pores in the wood tend to capture more of the pigments. Pine and spruce are susposed to have large pores and oak very small with birch somewhere in-between. As for the rough appearance think about when you skin you knee on the sidewalk. There is usualy some flesh that didn't get ripped all the way off scattered throughout the wound. By wetting the wood the bits partly ripped off swell and stand up. When the wood dries the bits stay up but become stiff enough to be removed by more sandpaper. I only have read forums no pratical experience yet so good luck.