Slingbow shoots high

Discussion in 'Slingbows' started by Camo-sling, May 11, 2013.

  1. Camo-sling

    Camo-sling New Member

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    Hello,

    My slingbow based on Joerg's 120lbs concepts is consistently shooting too high. This isn't user error as shots with other bows do not shoot high.

    I'm thinking it's to do with the rubber string. It's been taking a few experiments and trial and error to really create a bow string which isn't too loose, powerful and easy to pull back with fingers as opposed to a release.

    I'm wondering if the rubber black theraband needs to be exactly equal on both sides of the nocking point to be accurate. Did anyone have any problems or experience getting the rubber bow string tuned in? Joerg's video seemed to have a perfect bow string so I'm wondering if it took a bit of time to make a really good string. I'm not sure if I can get this bow as accurate as my other recurve bows.

    Thanks

    Nick.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2013
  2. onnod

    onnod Im from Holland, isnt that weird?

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    ofcoarse the bands have to be equal, it is the same as on a normal slingshot, onequal bands result in bad shots
     

  3. Achso_42

    Achso_42 Senior Member

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    On a bow, unequal have a bigger effect because of the fletching, kind of archers-paradox I think.
     
  4. squidget

    squidget Junior Member

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    are you shooting a ball (either lead or steel) or an arrow?
    if it is a ball it could be that the ammo is sitting a bit high in the pouch this will put spin that raises the projectile (kind of the way a dirty rifle barrel will top spin a bullet).

    also like Achso said it could be the bands uneven, or like the ball not sitting correctly and with the high power the projectile is causing archers paradox.

    keep in mind a bullet when fired for around the first 200 meters does "climb" as its travelling then after around 250 meters it drops. the high powered bands may be causing this effect.

    just a couple of things that spring to mind
     
  5. Camo-sling

    Camo-sling New Member

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    Thanks for the advice guys! I will make my next string with exactly the same amount of rubber on each side and see how it shoots! I'll update the thread when it's finished!
     
  6. roger59

    roger59 Member

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    Plus, Once the bands are equal, you have accounted for parallax (eyes look here, arrow pointed there.) you will find that if you pull the trigger, or if you shoot by hand, you flinch and tense before you release, or even if you breathe in as you release all shots will be out- no matter how consistently you aim, and how controlled you hold the weapon. this is called "target panic" and can lead to much more serious complications especially when hunting.

    to counter this you will need to focus on your breath, a relaxed grip on the weapon, equal isometric force upon the grip and a mind to the flight path of the projectile (this part could take hours to calculate, but in this instance we will take instinctive shooting as our flight plan).

    Now carefully aim the weapon at the target, in your relaxed stance. with any kind of archery, slingshot or speargun, your grip on the weapon is open.

    This prevents any undue influence onto the body of the weapon as it releases, rifles, crossbows, launchers and similar on the other hand will need an equal isometric force between grip, fore and hand.

    As you release with a bow, slingshot or speargun (without trigger group- these are the only legal kind here in Victoria) you will be halfway through your exhale breath and your grip hand is open and straight holding the grip of the weapon so your thumb and forefinger cannot touch and with enough grip on the weapon to safely draw the weapon.

    As you release, you should be relaxed and your stance remain consistent through the shot, and your pouch/arrow/spear hand releases first- then drops relaxed (but hopefully not off the end of your arm...) and continue to exhale, uninterrupted until the projectile "reports" or you are certain the projectile is clear.

    Shooting with a gun is similar (but not at all, really). No force is held by the body, it is all stored force contained withing the weapon, the breathing method is the same, but the stance and the hold are to sit the weapon on your body like a weapon mount, and your trigger release must NOT interfere with the stability of the weapon at all, if you wish to hit your target effectively.

    if you wish to learn more, watch Olympic archers shoot the bull, google Zen archery, Sniper, or buy a training manual on archery method.

    bye for now.