shooting the Aluminium Howitzer Slingshot

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by Tobias, Oct 3, 2011.

  1. Tobias

    Tobias New Member

    390
    0
    0
    here a short video form me with the alu-howitzer slingshot!<br><br>shoot 16mm steel in butterfly.<br><br><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkCytFYHkq4" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkCytFYHkq4</a>
     
  2. Oldschool

    Oldschool New Member

    119
    0
    0
    Awesome, when I save up I'm gonna get one! <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_bounce.gif" alt="bounce" longdesc="27">
     

  3. Tobias

    Tobias New Member

    390
    0
    0
    this slingshot is always good!
     
  4. Joe

    Joe New Member

    51
    0
    0
  5. mrjoel

    mrjoel New Member

    97
    0
    0
    It looks to be a great portable butterfly shooter. I like the monkey bars.
     
  6. Slingshots4Australia

    Slingshots4Australia New Member

    126
    0
    0
    Ive always planned to get myself one of these, the bronze one is my personal fav.<br>it is a bit pricey though, looks like a very nice shooter<br>one day <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_razz.gif" alt="Razz" longdesc="9"><br><br>I found this video quite funny, i cant speak german at all, but i found my self chuckling alittle bit when you were like " *German* joreg sprave *more German* Howitser *German* aluminum " <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_razz.gif" alt="Razz" longdesc="9"><br><br>and the head bopping to the music at the end <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_cool.gif" alt="Cool" longdesc="6"><br><br>good video, good slingy and good shooting sir <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_tongue.png" alt="tongue" longdesc="24">
     
  7. mrjoel

    mrjoel New Member

    97
    0
    0
    Here is the entomology of the word to better understand the controversy between the two spellings of American and British aluminium vs.aluminum:<br><br>Two variants of the metal's name are in current use, aluminium and aluminum (besides the obsolete alumium). The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) adopted aluminium as the standard international name for the element in 1990 but, three years later, recognized aluminum as an acceptable variant. Hence their periodic table includes both.[59] IUPAC prefers the use of aluminium in its internal publications, although nearly as many IUPAC publications use the spelling aluminum.[60]<br>Most countries use the spelling aluminium. In the United States, the spelling aluminum predominates.[14][61] The Canadian Oxford Dictionary prefers aluminum, whereas the Australian Macquarie Dictionary prefers aluminium. In 1926, the American Chemical Society officially decided to use aluminum in its publications; American dictionaries typically label the spelling aluminium as a British variant.<br>The name aluminium derives from its status as a base of alum. It is borrowed from Old French; its ultimate source, alumen, in turn is a Latin word that literally means "bitter salt".[62]<br>The earliest citation given in the Oxford English Dictionary for any word used as a name for this element is alumium, which British chemist and inventor Humphry Davy employed in 1808 for the metal he was trying to isolate electrolytically from the mineral alumina. The citation is from the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London: "Had I been so fortunate as to have obtained more certain evidences on this subject, and to have procured the metallic substances I was in search of, I should have proposed for them the names of silicium, alumium, zirconium, and glucium."[63][64]<br>Davy settled on aluminum by the time he published his 1812 book Chemical Philosophy: "This substance appears to contain a peculiar metal, but as yet Aluminum has not been obtained in a perfectly free state, though alloys of it with other metalline substances have been procured sufficiently distinct to indicate the probable nature of alumina."[65] But the same year, an anonymous contributor to the Quarterly Review, a British political-literary journal, in a review of Davy's book, objected to aluminum and proposed the name aluminium, "for so we shall take the liberty of writing the word, in preference to aluminum, which has a less classical sound."[66]<br>The -ium suffix conformed to the precedent set in other newly discovered elements of the time: potassium, sodium, magnesium, calcium, and strontium (all of which Davy isolated himself). Nevertheless, -um spellings for elements were not unknown at the time, as for example platinum, known to Europeans since the 16th century, molybdenum, discovered in 1778, and tantalum, discovered in 1802. The -um suffix is consistent with the universal spelling alumina for the oxide, as lanthana is the oxide of lanthanum, and magnesia, ceria, and thoria are the oxides of magnesium, cerium, and thorium respectively.<br>The spelling used throughout the 19th century by most U.S. chemists was aluminium, but common usage is less clear.[67] The aluminum spelling is used in the Webster's Dictionary of 1828. In his advertising handbill for his new electrolytic method of producing the metal 1892, Charles Martin Hall used the -um spelling, despite his constant use of the -ium spelling in all the patents[57] he filed between 1886 and 1903.[68] It has consequently been suggested that the spelling reflects an easier to pronounce word with one fewer syllable, or that the spelling on the flier was a mistake. Hall's domination of production of the metal ensured that the spelling aluminum became the standard in North America; the Webster Unabridged Dictionary of 1913, though, continued to use the -ium version.<br><br><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminum#Etymology" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminum#Etymology</a><br><br>
     
  8. Courier

    Courier Senior Member

    797
    0
    0
    A nice video Tobias.<br>I like the slingshot, but i agree with<font color="black"> Slingshots4Australia, that the bronze colored ss looks greater than the black.<br>Ein schönes großes Bierfass hattest du da als Ziel. Ich hoffe du hast es nicht ganz alleine getrunken. </font> <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2">
     
  9. Tobias

    Tobias New Member

    390
    0
    0
    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Slingshots4Australia wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">
    <br><br>I found this video quite funny, i cant speak german at all, but i found my self chuckling alittle bit when you were like " *German* joreg sprave *more German* Howitser *German* aluminum " <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_razz.gif" alt="Razz" longdesc="9"><br><br>and the head bopping to the music at the end <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_cool.gif" alt="Cool" longdesc="6"><br><br>good video, good slingy and good shooting sir <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_tongue.png" alt="tongue" longdesc="24">
    </td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br><br>Hey i am glad you like it <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1"> this cellar vids are all made at night with some good german beer <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_cool.gif" alt="Cool" longdesc="6"><br><br>@courier: no i don´t drink this beer barrel! I see it only as a spray, it was hit by the cannonball.<br><a href="http://youtu.be/_AySuafZ8to?t=2m6s" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://youtu.be/_AySuafZ8to?t=2m6s</a></span>
     
  10. mrjoel

    mrjoel New Member

    97
    0
    0
    I like Tobias' practical innovations that have enhanced flat band power butterfly shooting into an art form. The fist grip and this slingshot are fine examples of this.<br><br>Rock on dude <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_twisted.gif" alt="Twisted Evil" longdesc="13">!