Rounding edges with a Router

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by jt-1911, May 4, 2013.

  1. jt-1911

    jt-1911 Senior Member ProPlatinum

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    Hey,
    So on Gamekeeper Catapults, he has been rounding the edges with a router! Which is a ingenious idea. Anyway I got out mine today and tried it, but to say the least it was very dangerous. This was so because the slingshot (Multiplex 18mm) Would snag as it touched the router blades and and fly of. Does anyone have some advice?
    Cheers JT
     
  2. maggo

    maggo New Member

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    I was thinking the same as i thought i might use a router for building a slingshot.
    With small objects like a slingshot its very difficult, because the slingshot cannot really be clamped.
    If you use very slim clamps to hold the slingshot in place you could build a podest that you mount on the router, so that the router moves freely above the slingshot and clamp. This has to be very rigid though.

    Another way would be using a routing table where the router is mounted under the table plate with the routing tip sticking up.

    The rounding should definetly be done in several steps, because multiplex is very hard and kicks very easily.

    EDIT: I decided not to use a router, because it feels too dangerous for me. And I don't own a routing table.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2013

  3. eulengesicht

    eulengesicht New Member

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    A router is the most dangerous and nasty tool I know. Best is you make a screen mask which cant be cutted by the router and put it on the edges with screw clamps. But i would prefer using another tool. Belt - sander or....
     
  4. jt-1911

    jt-1911 Senior Member ProPlatinum

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    I have a router table like this one:
    http://www.harborfreight.com/media/...b33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_11940.jpg

    You got a point there with making this several steps, but watch this video:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKJdPjzqsrU
    At 2:55

    I just noticed I have exactly the same router, but a larger drill but, maybe that will make the difference

    Thanks for the answers
     
  5. maggo

    maggo New Member

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    Do you have birch-multiplex or beech-multiplex.
    I'm not sure what's used in the video.

    Beech is a lot harder.
    I don't think that the size of the drill matters if you round it the same amount as in the video.
     
  6. jt-1911

    jt-1911 Senior Member ProPlatinum

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    I am not sure if its beech, it was from a scrap box. Is there a way to find out?
     
  7. eulengesicht

    eulengesicht New Member

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    Ok now i know what you mean.

    Either gamekeeper is a damn routined craftsman or it is real easy to do it with a router table. I guess first. Of course the router has to be conditioned for that work (rpm, knife).
     
  8. eulengesicht

    eulengesicht New Member

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    Should be birch multiplex, i handle it daily and its colour seems like birch.
     
  9. maggo

    maggo New Member

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    the one in the video yes. i thought the same too. its quite bright.
    beech is a little darker - more brown.

    but in a video its always hard to tell because of possible miscoloration from the camera.
    birch is much easier to handle.
     
  10. eulengesicht

    eulengesicht New Member

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    Light it up, you can smell the diffrence easily.


    Just kidding ;-D
     
  11. eulengesicht

    eulengesicht New Member

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    I can hear what kind of wood it is when its sawed. On a good day i can even tell you the thickness.
     
  12. Slagskimmer Mike

    Slagskimmer Mike thinks TBG smells better than roses

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    I agree totally that routers are about the nastiest, most hazardous of wood tools.

    The larger the diameter of the bit, the more leverage the motor has to toss your work if it grabs.

    Experience is the only way to use it safely. Just do a bunch of larger stuff until you have a feel for the forces you will encounter. The muscle memory you make working in safer large stuff is essential when your project gets smaller and fingers get closer.

    And even though I needn't say it--its really good to have someone around when your at it, paramedics particularly hate routers because they make very bloody messes very quickly.

    The results of a gorgeous round over blend is worth the steep learning curve though, and a huge time saver.
     
  13. zwillie

    zwillie New Member

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  14. Bert the Welder

    Bert the Welder New Member

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    Router table is the way to go with something like this. There's not enough surface area for the router to rest on top of the SS. Zwillie has a nice one. You won't need the fence. Good trick for when your new to it: drill a hole in, but not through, the table top, about an inch away from the router bit. Use a dowel pin or cut nail as a pin ( should fit snug in the hole). Use this as a sort of rest to ease the piece into the bit. Your finger pressure should be down against the table and against the pin. Also , the pin should be at about 3 o'clock to the bit on the side facing the bit rotation. This way you feed the work against the rotation of the bit. This puts the force from the spinning bit towards your fingers which helps keep your grip. If you feed the piece in the direction of rotation, the bit wants to grab the piece and pull it away from you.
    And like Mike said, muscle memory is a big part of using any tool. Practice on scrap lots first. Don't lean you whole body weight towards the bit. With smaller stuff like that, try to move the piece with your fingers, keeping the heel of your hand on the table top. This prevents the feed pressure from carrying through if you slip.
    Youtube has lots of videos on router table techniques.
     
  15. jt-1911

    jt-1911 Senior Member ProPlatinum

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    Well in the Video, I edit the brightness and exposure so dont rely on that :)
     
  16. jt-1911

    jt-1911 Senior Member ProPlatinum

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    Thanks, Im gonna check youtube then :)
     
  17. zwillie

    zwillie New Member

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    Hi,
    for those who don`t want to build a router table.
    Just screw a little piece of wood same thickness as your slingshot on the underside of your router as a support (no wobbling).

    [​IMG]

    Zwillie
     
  18. eulengesicht

    eulengesicht New Member

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