Rambone, Scout, ... wich Slingshot is the best on long distance accuracy?

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by Miriu, Feb 15, 2014.

  1. Miriu

    Miriu New Member

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    Hello Guys

    I´m thinking about buying a new Slingshot. I would like to buy a slingshot that allows me to be very accurate on the long distances.

    Which sling would you recommend?

    Can someone also explain the difference (advantages and disadvantages) between Flatbands and Tubebands?

    And my last question is: What kind of bullets would you recommend to be as accurate as possible on long distance shooting?

    Thanks and Greets

    Miriu
     
  2. VWscooby

    VWscooby Senior Member

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    The Rambone allows stronger bands by design but accuracy is down to the shooter not the slingshot. Flatbands are more effecient than tubes and are easier to pull at any given weight but tubes last longer. For the rest Im sure someone else will wade in :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2014

  3. Viks

    Viks Member

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    I think 9mm or 10mm steel balls are good for long distances even though i use 18mm for not so long range.
     
  4. Chase

    Chase New Member

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    As a non-experienced slingshot shooter, I understand how diffucult it is to aim with a slingshot.
    Don't you have an opportunity to build a "barell-based" slingshot? It is much-much easier to aim with a simple rifle-like thing.

    Also, I remember seen a commercial product somewhere, it is something similar to Joerg's design, but more accurate.
    http://www.catsdomain.com/

    I don't own that, so can't say if it is, or it's not as good as they say.
    It is pretty easy to build by yourself, though.

    About the ammo,
    in my opinion, you should use the lead balls, the closer the shape is to the ideal ball, the better. also, it is much easier to aim with high velocity ammo, so you may want to use smaller diameter balls to achieve that.
    But remember, you will learn to shoot better intuitively much faster if you can see the projectile flying,
    so the heavier and slower ammo may be pretty good for training.
     
  5. studer1972

    studer1972 scooter trash

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    Joerg advises light bands and paintballs at first. I say get a commercial tube frame, preferably Trumark as they have the best tubes, and start shooting. I don't/can't aim, but on just about any fork, if you shoot sideways/gangster style, you can use the top fork as a site and adjust fire from there. If you really want a sight, the Trumark FSX-FO has nice fiber optic sites. The Barnett Pro Diablo 2 has an adjustable sight, but I didn't have much luck with it. If you have the money, Saunders Archery's Falcon II can be upgraded with their Pipper sight. Saunders' slingshots use premade flat bands with a great pouch. They don't pull as smoothly as Thera Band Gold (TBG) flats or Trumark tubes, but they pack a wallop and are long lasting. The clips on the Saunders slingshots are the easiest and safest band attachment system I know of. Saunders' flat band slingshots work just fine with TBG flats, too.

    If you want to know more about long range shooting, I can't think of a better source than Bill Hays of Pocket Predator. Check this out:

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Eam60VVu6Y[/ame]

    The biggest thing, whichever route you choose, is to get a slingshot and start shooting.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2014
  6. CJW

    CJW New Member

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    Can't speak about the Rambone don't own one but I have several Scouts and they are great slingshots.And with the new flip clip super easy to band.Farthest I shoot is about 50 to 60 feet.


    Sent from my iPhone using Slingshot Forum
     
  7. Slagskimmer Mike

    Slagskimmer Mike thinks TBG smells better than roses

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    If you want lots a power, start shooting full butterfly with paintballs. Start close to the target and step back when you get three good hits in a row, repeat.
    When silly, scary things stop happening with your pouch, frame, etc switch to hard ammo.

    The accuracy will come with time, whether you aim every shot, or go the instinctive route and fire "from the hip".

    Which frame suits you best is just a matter of trial and try another, and another, I love them all! Muhahahaha!
    Oops excuse me.
    Yeah. Buy both.
     
  8. jnmbhj

    jnmbhj Slingshots FTW

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    I would suggest going with the finger and thumb frame like the scout rather than a rambone for accuracy. but the rambone is much better for handling strong bands and heavy ammo. There are 3 types of grips the hammer style the thumb and finger support and the pinch grip. I would suggest using light bands and 8-10 mm ammo or 5/16 inch steel or 3/8 inch steel for target.
    As for aiming I usually hold my slingshot sideways or how people call it "gangster style" then aim using the top of the fork.
    But thats just my opinion use which ever one you think is the best

    Rambone = More power heavy ammo
    Scout = less power more accurate (in my opinion)
     
  9. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    Both frames can be extremely accurate and strong, but all of that depends on the shooter as noted by several folks above. Think of a golf club. People sink tons of money into expensive golf clubs that rarely do much to actually improve their game. Take a golf pro and hand him a cheap club and he'll out perform a guy with a really expensive club that doesn't have his experience. The difference is in the golfer far more than the equipment. The pro golfer hits hundreds of balls for hours a day in practice where the casual golfer may only hit a couple of dozen a couple of times a week. Of course the pro can do it better because he's trained himself to do it. I watched a pro golfer do a demonstration where he hit a drive using a putter - he out drove most golfers I've ever seen hit the ball using a club that wasn't meant to make that shot.

    The same goes for slingshots. Get a slingshot that is comfortable for you, fits your preferred shooting style and can handle the types of bands and/or tubes you want to use. After that, it's time to put in a lot of practice. The more you practice, the better you'll get. Set up targets and distances that allow you to measure your improvement over time. The best thing to do is stick with one particular slingshot with one particular band/pouch setup and one type of ammo. This allows for consistency. Once you've hit your target consistently, then you can move on to other challenges like increasing your distance to the target or changing your ammo size.

    In the end, you are the main factor in accuracy, not your slingshot. As I've mentioned on other threads, Arturo Borquez can nail a small target at a long distance using an iPhone as his slingshot. It's about his skill, not the material in his hand.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2014
  10. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    The accuracy is all in the shooter. The most important thing about a frame is individual comfort. If a frame is awkwardly shaped, then the shooter will be distracted and his accuracy goes down.

    Some people prefer the support grip (Scout), some prefer the hammer grip (Rambone). My observation is that the support grip is often favored by shooters that grew up shooting simple natural forks. Those must be shot in the support style as the thin handle and narrow fork angle does not give sufficient purchase for the hammer grip. Shooters that have just started and/or come from archery often prefer the hammer grip style.

    I like the hammer grip style even though I had a natural fork as a kid and for the first few months, I started out with support shooters. But I was converted by another German shooter, Baumstamm.

    Why do I love hammer grip slingshots more?

    1. The hammer grip is stronger (as it accommodates the human hand better - we are adapted to hold a club)
    2. The hammer grip allows a more comfortable wrist angle
    3. The hammer grip is more safe (your fingers are not as close to the path of the ball)

    The biggest disadvantage of the hammer grip is that it only works when the handle is ergonomically shaped and has enough depth. This means that hammer grip slingshots are more bulky and won't slip in a pocket.

    Pocket shooters are usually support grip models. Even the Scout with it's distinctive palm swell easily fits in a pocket, whereas the Rambone is a lot more bulky.

    Since hammer grip slingshots like the Rambone allow higher draw weights, they would be better for long range shooting with heavy balls. Most long range shooters use small BBs (6mm, 8mm or so). For such small ammo you need very little draw weight (but you need to learn full butterfly).
     
  11. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    The accuracy is all in the shooter. The most important thing about a frame is individual comfort. If a frame is awkwardly shaped, then the shooter will be distracted and his accuracy goes down.

    Some people prefer the support grip (Scout), some prefer the hammer grip (Rambone). My observation is that the support grip is often favored by shooters that grew up shooting simple natural forks. Those must be shot in the support style as the thin handle and narrow fork angle does not give sufficient purchase for the hammer grip. Shooters that have just started and/or come from archery often prefer the hammer grip style.

    I like the hammer grip style even though I had a natural fork as a kid and for the first few months, I started out with support shooters. But I was converted by another German shooter, Baumstamm.

    Why do I love hammer grip slingshots more?

    1. The hammer grip is stronger (as it accommodates the human hand better - we are adapted to hold a club)
    2. The hammer grip allows a more comfortable wrist angle
    3. The hammer grip is more safe (your fingers are not as close to the path of the ball)

    The biggest disadvantage of the hammer grip is that it only works when the handle is ergonomically shaped and has enough depth. This means that hammer grip slingshots are more bulky and won't slip in a pocket.

    Pocket shooters are usually support grip models. Even the Scout with it's distinctive palm swell easily fits in a pocket, whereas the Rambone is a lot more bulky.

    Since hammer grip slingshots like the Rambone allow higher draw weights, they would be better for long range shooting with heavy balls. Most long range shooters use small BBs (6mm, 8mm or so). For such small ammo you need very little draw weight (but you need to learn full butterfly).
     
  12. DLEGION

    DLEGION New Member

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    hi all!

    after this reading i'm pretty sure rambone is a good choice...i'v e just a question about it:
    can "flipclips" (i see them on slingshot cahnnel store) be mounted on rambone?

    thanks , bye!
     
  13. bigdh2000

    bigdh2000 Administrator

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    I have not seen it done. The store-bought model may require modification to accommodate the clips. Nathan or Jörg might know differently.
     
  14. DLEGION

    DLEGION New Member

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    ok thanks for the info....will wait for more confirmations :)
    i really think a simple and fast attach method (possibly without the use of tools, i know this is not the case) is important.
    thanks
     
  15. I prefer The rambone because of the hammer grip
     
  16. Tremoside

    Tremoside SINdustrial designer

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    Hi Miriu,

    You asked a hard question :).

    Sometimes I use a Scout for 20meters with 10mm Steel balls, butterfly. It's fine for shooting with the default bands at this distance too, but with a bit smaller ammo and the power is pretty low.

    Have no experience with the Rambone, but a custom lanyard with a cobra stitch paracord work can really help to make the Scout more powerful. The clips will make your life easier especially if you're a beginner.

    My suggestion is to practice-practice with a Scout and purchase later or at the same time a Rambone too. If you explore both support and hammer styles you will find your way. Even find out what to build later.

    If your focus is really on accurate and distance shooting with fine power than consider to purchase or build a "starship".

    A fine commercial slingshot for accuracy and power is the braced Trident from Simple Shot | Milbro Pro Shot.

    Have a nice day,
    Tremo