question on pouch grip

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by rashid100, Jul 23, 2012.

  1. rashid100

    rashid100 New Member

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    hey guys!! i was just shooting my slingshots and was trying out different grips on the ammo pouch.. just wanted to know whats the right way to hold it. do u hold the ammo itself or a bit in front of it on the pouch. any replies would help a ton!!! thanx<br>cheers, ra$hid <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1"><img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_cheers.png" alt="cheers" longdesc="28">
     
  2. pelleteer

    pelleteer Middle Aged Delinquent

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    It's a very personal thing. Some (most I'd say) hold between the thumb and index finger, while a few actually hold between the index and middle fingers. I tend to let the tips of my index finger and thumb pinch the pouch just in front of the ball. Some may actually hold the part of the pouch over the ball itself, idk. I think the most important aspect is not necessarily the hold you use but your release. It's taken me a long time to get to where I just barely ease my grip on the pouch enough to let it slip from my grip. THe natural tendency, especially for new shooters, is to let the pouch go all at once by quickly opening their fingers. This can easily throw off the shot. I had to learn the same thing with archery, letting the string ease off my finger tips, rather than jerking my fingers away from the string. Makes a tremendous difference.
     

  3. rashid100

    rashid100 New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>pelleteer wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">It's a very personal thing. Some (most I'd say) hold between the thumb and index finger, while a few actually hold between the index and middle fingers. I tend to let the tips of my index finger and thumb pinch the pouch just in front of the ball. Some may actually hold the part of the pouch over the ball itself, idk. I think the most important aspect is not necessarily the hold you use but your release. It's taken me a long time to get to where I just barely ease my grip on the pouch enough to let it slip from my grip. THe natural tendency, especially for new shooters, is to let the pouch go all at once by quickly opening their fingers. This can easily throw off the shot. I had to learn the same thing with archery, letting the string ease off my finger tips, rather than jerking my fingers away from the string. Makes a tremendous difference.</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"> could u give me more details on the release... seems like thats effecting my shots..... thanx</span>
     
  4. tokSick

    tokSick Senior Member

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    Tobias made a video where he shows a " unusual " way to hold and release the pouch. But i believe it is for butterfly style only.
     
  5. slingking99

    slingking99 New Member

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    its just up to you <br><br><br><br>adam
     
  6. pelleteer

    pelleteer Middle Aged Delinquent

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    There are two things I focused on when trying to improve my release. First, I ease my grip on the pouch just enough so the pouch slips through my fingers, rather than opening my fingers really fast. The second is follow through. What I mean by this is that I continue to hold my pouch hand in the same position for a couple seconds after I release, rather than allowing it to immediately drop back to my side. I learned this shooting archery but had to relearn it with slingshots (D'oh!). The theory is that what happens when you don't follow through is that you can actually start to drop your pouch hand from the firing position subconsciously before you've actually let go of the pouch. It's a very, very minor movement but enough to make a difference in where your shot hits. Both of these techniqes must be practiced slowly at first, but once you get used to it, it become second nature.
     
  7. rashid100

    rashid100 New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>pelleteer wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">There are two things I focused on when trying to improve my release. First, I ease my grip on the pouch just enough so the pouch slips through my fingers, rather than opening my fingers really fast. The second is follow through. What I mean by this is that I continue to hold my pouch hand in the same position for a couple seconds after I release, rather than allowing it to immediately drop back to my side. I learned this shooting archery but had to relearn it with slingshots (D'oh!). The theory is that what happens when you don't follow through is that you can actually start to drop your pouch hand from the firing position subconsciously before you've actually let go of the pouch. It's a very, very minor movement but enough to make a difference in where your shot hits. Both of these techniqes must be practiced slowly at first, but once you get used to it, it become second nature.</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"> thanx</span>
     
  8. Running_Riot

    Running_Riot New Member

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    In my opinion it depends on which ammo you are using. If you use stones for example, it isn't recommended to hold the ammo itself, because you maybe hurt yourself.<br><br>In general I prefer holding the pouch and not the ammo. <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15">