New Design and Shooting Platform From FlippinOut

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by Flippinout, Oct 7, 2011.

  1. Flippinout

    Flippinout New Member

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    I have been working on a design over the past three months that a few have heard mention of- <br><br>"The Hare Splitter"<br><br>I have gone through about 15 prototypes to get to the present state and with each one, I am becoming more and more convinced that I have designed the perfect shooting platform. So much so, that I immediately secured a provisional patent for my design and concept while I continued to work out the final elements of the look and feel.<br><br>The Hair Splitter incorporates many of the concepts found in traditional archery such as keeping the projectile close to the hand and reducing strain on the wrist by utilizing the skeletal structure rather than muscles and tendon. When these attributes are designed into the slingshot, it creates a slingshot that is easy on the joints, points with natural and intuitive ease, and helps to ensure good alignment through intentional design.<br><br><a href="http://flippinoutslingshots.com/975/the-hare-splitter-a-design-revolution/" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Check it out here</a><br><br>There will be more updates as the look and feel of the final design comes to fruition.
     
  2. Cuthbert Allgood

    Cuthbert Allgood New Member

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    holy crap, nathan. those are amazing. so inspiring! i cannot wait to try it someday
     

  3. Antraxx

    Antraxx #7

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    the look is brilliant, as usual, but..."perfect" and "patent" for the form?....the slingshot is SUCH an old weapon, don´t you think that if this would be really the <i>ultimate</i> way to shoot one, it would have been invented long ago?
     
  4. Cuthbert Allgood

    Cuthbert Allgood New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Antraxx wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">the look is brilliant, as usual, but..."perfect" and "patent" for the form?....the slingshot is SUCH an old weapon, don´t you think that if this would be really the <i>ultimate</i> way to shoot one, it would have been invented long ago?</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br><br>I think you have a point, but do you see anything like this out there? Slingshots have been in a funk for a long time.. Only in the past couple decades have there been any real innovation. I think nathan is onto something.</span>
     
  5. Flippinout

    Flippinout New Member

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  6. Kyl

    Kyl New Member

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    Hey Nathan, I like your work and I like the design but I'm not sure you could get an actual patent. Even if there is nothing in the published patent documents you still have to prove that it doesn't exist in the common/public knowledge. Then you have to shell out the $5000-$7000 for attorney and filing fees. I think a provisional patent only gives you 12 months. Now that you've published your idea on the <a href="http://WWW." target="_blank" rel="nofollow">WWW.</a> it is definitely public knowledge. I'm pretty sure there is no "provisional patent" it's a "provisional application for patent." If you file a "provisional application for patent" you have to file a actual patent before the end of 12 months or your idea is unpatentable. On the public knowledge tip Robere/ToshTogo mentions building a similar unit on your "Hare Splitter" page and I built my wife a slingshot that looks very similar to yours. She uses the hammer fist grip and had trouble holding the forks even while maintaining a tight enough grip. <br>A provisional patent is still not bad. It lets you put "patent Pending" on your stuff. I'm not trying to be a flat liner but patents are really hard. I've researched patents extensively on a number of my inventions but to no avail. My grandfather spent years and thousands $$$ on a patent and ended with nothing. Then then are the weaselly attorneys and bureaucratic patent office clerks. If you ended up with an actual patent would it pay for its self within the 7 years? I wish you the best of luck and I'm glad to see top rate slingshot craftsmen here in Asheville, NC. I hope we might met in person. I need some of those steel balls you advertise and I'd love to see your slingshots in person. Cheers
     
  7. Flippinout

    Flippinout New Member

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    I understand your concerns. However, I have extensively researched the existing patents on slingshots and have had help from someone who has over 40 patents and counting. Yes, the provisional patent provides me 12 months of protection. Yes, the process can be expensive, and yes there <u>may</u> be other similar designs out there. However, US patent law provides protection to "first to file" not "first to invent". What's more, the current iteration of the design I have shown is just the tip of how this new design might work. I am still in the prototyping phase with variation on the inline design that clearly fulfills a functional and utilitarian role, well beyond a simple design patent. <br>The cost to do so is a risk I am taking with full awareness of international law, copies, and patent infringment. I believe in the design and until I can determine that my design is not worthwhile to pursue protection of my intellectual property, I will continue to take the steps necessary to do so. So, i have bought myself 12 months and will continue to work with the evolution of this design and the aspects that are most "copyable" that have yet to be revealed in the public domain. The slingshot enthusiast world is growing daily and a once vital industry(relatively speaking) is awakening to a new generation. I see the upside and am diligently working to support the sport that will grow the industry. Seven years, yes, I think seven years is doable!<br><br>
     
  8. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    Nathan, as always, great looking slingshot!<br><br>I am not sure about the patent issue, I have applied for and received several patents in my life (all of them job related, consumer electronics). <br><br>These things are black holes for money. Costs money to register, to maintain, to monitor the market, and even more money to fight them through in case someone infringes. A patent is not automatically international, btw. You have to go through a lengthy and expensive procedure to get protection in other countries. If you don't do it, competition can simply sell through an agent abroad. Plus, countries like China will ignore Western patents anyway.<br><br>Look at Charles Goodyear with his patent for vulcanized rubber. Revolutionized the world, but died as a pauper, having spent his fortune in legal bills. <br><br>My advice is: Protect your market by beeing what you are - an unrivaled artist and craftsman. People will want YOUR product and not a cheesy clone done by a less talented and experienced manufacturer. Invest your money in tools and great materials, not in legal bills. <br><br>Also, I tried this "pointed" style before, but of course for my preferred hammer grip. Using the strongest bands, the wrist always comes up again, and you end up having an oddly shaped frame with very high fork. You are right, the strain on the wrist is less if you point forwards, but so is the strength in your wrist. The human arm geometry is responsible for this, evolution is to blaim.
     
  9. Kyl

    Kyl New Member

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    I recently visited Nathan at his shop here in Asheville and had the chance to test out his new "Hare Splitter" sling shot. I really liked it. The design seems innovative yet subtle. He showed me several permutations of his design. There is a certain quality to the relationship of the hand to the forks that is hard to describe but is definitely unique and effective. It shot very well for me with almost no muscular tension yet carefully balanced skeletal alignment. An Orthopedic Slingshot? I am very intrigued and I hope I get to try it out some more...
     
  10. Flippinout

    Flippinout New Member

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    I believe any innovation in the slingshot realm must be subtle due to the basic technology involved. It appears, though, that you immediately understood the value and efficacy of the concept when shooting the Hare Splitter, the proof is in the pudding so they say.<br>I have had several other folks with limited to expert ability shoot this design and they have all shot it well immediately and commented on the ease with which they do so. The current iterations are going to be even more adaptable and "subtly" innovative.
     
  11. Ryan Wigglesworth

    Ryan Wigglesworth Senior Member

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    Interesting. I think you should send Joerg one to try out <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2">