Natural Hammerhandle in blue ink

Discussion in 'Show off your homemades!' started by JoergS, Apr 3, 2012.

  1. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    One more frame from the bunch of dogwood forks I harvested last year. This time, the fork was much smaller with less room for carving, and the fork was irregular with one arm thicker than the other one. <br><br>I made a small, but distinctively "hammerhead handled" piece. It may not look like it, but the height over the head is the same as on the Hammerhead - it looks higher because of the width of the Hammerhead fork.<br><br>Dogwood is dense, heavy and strong, but very pale. Almost like bone. So I inked the frame with blue ink and repolished - I just love that blue look, like a satellite photo of an island group in the Carribean. <br><br><br><br><div style="margin:auto;text-align:center;width:100%">
    <a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ZDQ3SGlc6RQ/T3qT2toehoI/AAAAAAAABkE/n6Na7jkNHUE/s1600/Dogwood2.JPG" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ZDQ3SGlc6RQ/T3qT2toehoI/AAAAAAAABkE/n6Na7jkNHUE/s320/Dogwood2.JPG" border="0" alt=""></a><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-eqgjTZsFMnk/T3qSYIj5yBI/AAAAAAAABjk/zj3k7TfnGfs/s1600/Blue2.JPG" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-eqgjTZsFMnk/T3qSYIj5yBI/AAAAAAAABjk/zj3k7TfnGfs/s320/Blue2.JPG" border="0" alt=""></a><br><br><br><br><br><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-81VGI74NCgQ/T3qSaZ9AH0I/AAAAAAAABjs/Cm2_VdSgtTM/s1600/Blue3.JPG" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-81VGI74NCgQ/T3qSaZ9AH0I/AAAAAAAABjs/Cm2_VdSgtTM/s320/Blue3.JPG" border="0" alt=""></a><br><br><br><br><br><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-8-9C7rCrFJY/T3qScEW1gdI/AAAAAAAABj0/l3jT26g9P9s/s1600/Blue4.JPG" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-8-9C7rCrFJY/T3qScEW1gdI/AAAAAAAABj0/l3jT26g9P9s/s320/Blue4.JPG" border="0" alt=""></a>
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  2. sotiris

    sotiris New Member

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  3. Ryan Wigglesworth

    Ryan Wigglesworth Senior Member

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    For some reason this isn't very impressive to behold, but I think that actually holding it would change that. <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15"> It looks very nice and smooth, perhaps the blue ink is making it unattractive to me, I'm not sure. <br><br>What do you think of this frame Joerg? Rated on a scale of 1 - 10?
     
  4. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    I find it hard to rate that piece. It is a natural fork, with its very own advantages and disadvantages. The wood is not noble, therefore the beauty aspect suffers, but then again it is from my own garden and the nicest wood you can find in the area. <br><br>The handle is nice, but not comparable to the much deeper and optimized Moorhammer. The Moorhammer feels like it is a part of my fist, sitting low and smug in my hand, always in the same position. <br><br>Then again this frame is a lot more pocketable than the Moorhammer. <br><br>The inking is a question of taste, I guess. It simply makes the frame special. All in all I really like the piece, a worthy part of my collection. Took me two hours total, one hour for the shaping and one for the polishing.<br><br>BTW, the inking always reminds me that you should water a wooden slingshot after you have polished it, and then repolish the somewhat rougher surface after the water has dried off. The fibers will have flatterend during the first polish, and will later on expand again. The watering and repolishing takes care of that issue and the result is a lot longer lasting surface.
     
  5. Ryan Wigglesworth

    Ryan Wigglesworth Senior Member

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    O my that is a nice tidbit of expertise there! Thanks <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1"> Are you suggesting to let it soak over night sorta? Or just a dab of water?<br><br><br>I think that all these naturals are awesome, but compared to a nice hunk of thuja or some other exotic they are hard to rate.<br><br>I find that the more slingshots I create, the more I have to stack them up and compare them to the previous works, raising the bar, lately I wonder just how high can the bar go, and after awhile will all my new works be better than the rest or will I hit a peak and they just cannot get any better....<br><br><br>For example I started whittling slingshots with an exacto knife, then I used some sand paper, with 220 being the highest grit, then I went higher and higher in grit and now 2000 is the final mark... But then the micro fibre clothes... I'm just worried that the skill will peak, the productions will not even get any better, and the thrill or spark I take from making a new one will be effectively gone <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_sad.gif" alt="Sad" longdesc="3"> At first it was just about making it, now its about doing it better and for showing off...<br><br>I suppose it can always still be therapy and a workout, all that rasping is good on the muscles, and all alone in the garage is good on the mind <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15">
     
  6. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    I enjoy the "flow" when I am in my workshop. You forget all the sorrows and frustration of a busy day in office. This is like a short vacation for me. <br><br>Just a dab of water is sufficient. Rinse your hands and then apply the moisture to the frame with your fingers and palms. It will dry within 10 minutes, and you will be surprised how furry a once shining frame will be. <br><br>And don't worry, there is always room for more skills. Someday soon I will carve motives into my frames. How about a Charles Goodyear or Rufus Hussey motive?
     
  7. Ryan Wigglesworth

    Ryan Wigglesworth Senior Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>JoergS wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">I enjoy the "flow" when I am in my workshop. You forget all the sorrows and frustration of a busy day in office. This is like a short vacation for me. <br><br>Just a dab of water is sufficient. Rinse your hands and then apply the moisture to the frame with your fingers and palms. It will dry within 10 minutes, and you will be surprised how furry a once shining frame will be. <br><br>And don't worry, there is always room for more skills. Someday soon I will carve motives into my frames. How about a Charles Goodyear or Rufus Hussey motive?</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br><br><br>I'm thinking zombies <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1"><img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_twisted.gif" alt="Twisted Evil" longdesc="13"><img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_twisted.gif" alt="Twisted Evil" longdesc="13"> And I had similar thoughts of neat carvings and engravings and burnings... There is so much to do with wood, it slipped my groggy mind! <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1"><br><br><br>Now I may have to refinish my already finished slingshots... That's ok... I can't say one is reallllly done yet lol <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_razz.gif" alt="Razz" longdesc="9"> (altho I'm getting better with super glue)</span>