natural fork drying

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by R3dsnail, Oct 5, 2011.

  1. R3dsnail

    R3dsnail New Member

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    Now then i`ve a qustion for any wood butchers out there<br><br><br><br>Q. what is the beast way to dry out dry wood with or with out bark stripped.I stripped one back on the weekend (cherry wood ) and it all split ,it was left in a warm room too.
     
  2. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    I always strip the fork, then microwave it.<br><br>600 Watts, 90 seconds. Then a long break (like an hour or so). Repeat two or three times. <br><br>Afterwards, fork is dry. <br><br>Big advantage: The humidity evaporates as steam, which prevents cracks to some extend. <br><br>Some forks are under a lot of tension and WILL crack no matter what you do. These forks are sometimes not worth saving.
     

  3. 3bears

    3bears New Member

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    i'm going to have to try this microwaving trick, i've been leaving mine for months at a time and hoping they dont crack lol
     
  4. Antraxx

    Antraxx #7

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    did this a few times now. works pretty well.<br>only one cracked...the harder the wood is, the more it tends to crack...sometimes there is tention you can´t see and it will just give up.<br><br>very fresh and wet forks do need a few sessions ofc. i sometimes did 5 or 6 of them and spread them over 2 days, worked just fine.
     
  5. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    I overdid one recently, breaks too short. It was cool to the touch after maybe ten minutes, and I put it in again. Then, a loud "bang" came out of the microwave - and some smoke. <br><br>There was a black crack in the handle, looked like nothing serious, But when I widened it, it turned out that whole frame had turned to charcoal from the inside out...<br><br>Keep the breaks long enough!
     
  6. Kyl

    Kyl New Member

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    I have tried it both ways. Letting it dry for many months and microwaving. They both work well but the magnetron is faster. One trick I found works well is to cut the stick much longer than you need, like 2"-3", because the only place it usually checks is at the end. A crack at the end of a log from drying is called a check. I just performed an experiment on microwaving hardwood slingshot forks just the other day. I used three woods; Dog wood, Sugar Maple, and Crepe Myrtle. Each fork was fresh cut within one day. Each fork was left 2"-3" long with the bark on. I weighed each fork before radiating in the microwave on high for 1 minute and then again after each minute of radiation until it had lost 1/3 of its weight. I waited between 40 seconds and 1 minute between each dose of radiation. The microwave I used has a rotating carousel which I am sure helps heat the wood evenly. If your nuke doesn't have this proceed with caution. <br>Here are the results.<br><br>Magnetronic Fork Drying;<br><br>Dog wood 149 g @ beginning<br> 147 g +1 min<br> 135 g +1 min<br> 128 g +1 min<br> 116 g +1 min<br> 107 g +1 min<br> 100 g +1 min<br> 98 g +1 min<br><br>Sugar Maple 56 g @ beginning<br> 56 g +1 min<br> 53 g +1 min<br> 49 g +1 min<br> 46 g +1 min<br> 42 g +1 min<br> 39 g +1 min<br> 38 g +1 min<br><br>Crepe Myrtle 163 g @ beginning<br> 162 g +1 min<br> 157 g +1 min<br> 148 g +1 min<br> 139 g +1 min<br> 129 g +1 min<br> 120 g +1 min<br><br> I had no checks at all. At the end of each 1 min. cycle, when I pulled out the fork to weight it, The end of each cut would be covered in bubbling sap. The forks hissed and steamed quite a bit and made the kitchen smell nice. My wife asked what in the world was I cooking. I told her it was dessert for termites. She didn't believe me for a second. I have destroyed more than one microwave by irradiating non food stuff. like glass, dirt, rocks, bugs, plastics, and different metals to see if they would meld?. <br> One interesting result was that on the Maple and Dog Wood forks, the bark bubbled up in a curious way, like bacon. It made the bark loose and easy to remove. Maybe the microwave shoots two birds with one stone. The bark on the Crepe Myrtle was unphased and remained tight to the wood. Good luck
     
  7. Kyl

    Kyl New Member

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    That's funny you burned one up as well, Joerg. I did so as well. Ha! Smelled toasty. I think as the wood gets dryer and quits hissing that's enough heating. Most very hard woods are about 30% water when fresh cut. Maybe if you put the fork in a covered glass container in the microwave it would keep the Oxygen from actually burning the wood. It might, however, melt or vaporize the Lignin or other fats in the wood and cause them to migrate. Perhaps you could use one of those infra-red non-contact thermometers to check your progress?
     
  8. Antraxx

    Antraxx #7

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    those microwaves that don´t have a turning table (thats the cheap version) have something calles a wobbled where the radiation comes from.<br>most of the time hidden under a china-cuplike device. turns the rays in all directions because it also rotates and is made from metal.<br><br>so all are the same basically.
     
  9. R3dsnail

    R3dsnail New Member

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    thanks for the tips everyone will have to wait till the wife out for this one lol
     
  10. Oldschool

    Oldschool New Member

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    I use the microwave. I used to put them in ziplock bags and deflate and dry the bag every 30 seconds or so. Now I don't bother. Burnt an apple fork once and it gave it a cool effect on one side.
     
  11. Cuthbert Allgood

    Cuthbert Allgood New Member

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    i stuck an oak natural that was like half dry on my hot water radiator over night. I think it did the trick.<br>I do not own a microwave , but I often bring some forks into work with me and microwave them when its not very busy lol.
     
  12. porcelanowy

    porcelanowy New Member

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    Yellow <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"><br>I don&rsquo;t own a microwave (after last drying session at my parents house I might buy one <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15"> ) so drying a wood is a real pain in the&hellip; neck <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15"> especially when you find a interesting fork that &ldquo;could be the one&ldquo; <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15"><br>To prevent the cracking I:<br>- paint the ends of the fork with oil-pain<= crucial and it really works;<br>- put the fork in shaded and drafty place;<br>- after three-four weeks I strip off the bark;<br>- another moth ore so I bring the fork to the house where it stays in temperature about 18-20 °C for another month/two;<br>- after al this it should be dry enough to put under the radiator to speed up the drying without having any cracks.<br>Time may differ depending on the temperatures outside/in the house. Listen to the wood <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15"><img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"><br><br>All this didn&rsquo;t work with berberis (berberis vulgaris in this case) and I am very disappointed because it has a great color and a beautiful grain:<br><a href="http://img810.imageshack.us/img810/1408/img1151y.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://img810.imageshack.us/img810/1408/img1151y.jpg</a><br><a href="http://img822.imageshack.us/img822/245/img1157po.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://img822.imageshack.us/img822/245/img1157po.jpg</a><br>Cheers<br>Rafal