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Discussion Starter #1
Hey! First tiem poster here.

I never used a slingshot before, but, being a primitive man, I have been obsessing over various muscle-powered ball launchers for quite some time.

I decided on the bronze Moorhammer. It’s shiny! I’ll get some steel balls of the bigger variety and work myself down in weight and diameter, should my incompetence prove painful. I’ll be using TBG. Until I’m fairly competent I wont experiment with full butterfly and max power taperings due to muh wristslap, but I gravitate towards more power as most noobs are bound to do. I am depending on my hands for work which will surely add an element of leisurely tension to this hobby regardless.

What I’m looking for is a setup that will allow me to grow with the slingshot, and being a noob I value durability foremost. I like long walks and shooting at stuff which I’ll be doing a lot.

I don’t know what to order. What is a basic setup for a strong noob shooting 20 mm steel or lead with a bronze Moorhammer that will keep me set for quite some time? A bunch of TBG and some ammo - but what length of the bands when I set ’er up for the first time? Single, double or triple bands? Are there other things I should consider, too? I value weight and momentum higher than velocity.

I understand that starting with a more noob-friendly slingshot and less powerful bands would make sense, but I don’t mind learning technique the hard way unless we’re talking full blown bone fractures. Are we?

Best wishes
 

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Mad Scientist
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Well, hello there!
Seems you like to jump in at the deep end ;)
I don't shoot ammo that big, but the band calculator ( http://www.slingshotchannel.com/band_calc.html ) suggests triple bands of 2,5 cm TBG per side. Band length is dependent on your draw length.
With a draw length of 80 cm I'd go for 20 cm active band length (add maybe 2,5 cm for attachment). Stretching to 400 % should give you decent power with a long band life.
If you want more power, it's very easy to shorten the bands, stretching to 500 or 600 % and thus increasing draw weight and therefore power.

Nevertheless, might I suggest to start off with a weaker bandset and smaller ammo first? Or at least a very sturdy glove for your fork hand? Just to make sure the balls are going where you want them to.
I know it sounds boring, but the Moorhammer is a very low fork that can take a bit of practice to get used to. Would be a pity if the shiny bronze got dinged up by stray 20 mm steel balls... And I guess I don't have to mention what one of those will do to your hand?


By the way, making your own bands is not hard, and investing in a rotary cutter, a cutting mat, a ruler and some TBG will set you up for a very long time.
 

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Ah the bronze moorhammer. The frame of legends. Wrought on Vulcan’s forge in fire and darkness. It’s a mighty weapon: it weighs nearly a kilogram and it does indeed beg for powerful bands. But it’s not for the uninitiated.

The copper in the bronze oxidises latex rubber so you will need a layer of protective theraband between the prongs and the band set. The bands are not inflexible enough to support the weight of the frame easily so if you’re going for walks with it you will need to consider how you are going to carry it. I’ve got a two compartment pouch for carrying. One pouch is for the frame and the other pouch keeps the band set separate. It’s a heavy load to shove into a pocket with the risk of damaging the latex. It’s a beauty to shoot though.

I’ve dinged mine once, when I experimented with a different style of grip. The main thing to prevent this is following all the usual advice about positioning the pouch This photo just shows equal tension on the bands and the pouch equidistant from each prong. A mirror or camera helps

Good luck and Belargo has sensible advice if you’re going to jump in at the deep end. Personally I would start with light bands and scrunched up tin foil balls until I was confident with my positioning and technique.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the fast advice! I’ll get smaller ammo as well and practice with aluminium balls, too.

I might get a Rambone instead - for all intents and purposes it seems like the more sensible choice, and I’d rather support Gogun until I can craft my own. But I like the Bronze age vibe and IMO dents and dings give character to metal tools. I saw someone hammered the bronze on his/hers - really like the look!
 

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I nearly mentioned the hammered Moorhammer and this (Hammered bronze Moorhammer ) is a link for those who are interested.

I totally sympathise with the Bronze Age vibe. I’m glad I didn’t start out with it though: I’d humbly suggest you get some experience with other styles and materials first. It just helps to appreciate it more. Like a car. You’d be spoiled if your first car was a Lamborghini.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
True! Okay, so I read through the forums and I’m not attempting 20mm anytime soon... I think. I’ll work myself up in weight and bands instead. I seriously underestimated the potential for injury, hehe
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Moorhammer on the way! Got it with some standard cut (I guess) TBG. Looking for wholesale sheets of rubber, tools etc is for later.

I just realized... will paintballs work for this setup? Is there noob friendly practice ammo for it, or is it guaranteed wristslap territory?
 

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Good buy guy ;-)
You will certainly have to work your way through this "charismatic" weapon. Start with low draw weights and well matched ammo. Fork hits and hand slabs may occur occasionally. But once you've mastered it, there is no way back to anything less than the king of catapults.
Have fun and share some success!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thx, Bronzehammer!

I figure I’ll get some heavy biodegradable clay and experiment as paintballs might be a bit light starting with these bands. Lots of information to process lol
 

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As Belargo suggested, use the band calculator. Measure your draw length, set the band values to <5 each and weigh your clay ammo. Set the steel ammo diameter accordingly.
Also wear a glove initially for protection which is BTW always a good idea because of the 5%-6% lead in the bronze used by Hogan castings.

Remember: This slingshot is like a Ferrari, produces intense and joyful experiences but is not as forgiving as a Lada Niva
 

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In my experience the bands that come as standard will shoot 16mm glass marbles at full butterfly without hand slap. Not to say you won’t hit your hand or frame with the ammo if you haven’t set up your shot properly.

The advantage of starting with a Lada Niva: you will know how powerful and temperamental powerful and temperamental is but at least you will have more background knowledge experience muscle memory strength etc etc to control it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
In my experience the bands that come as standard will shoot 16mm glass marbles at full butterfly without hand slap. Not to say you won’t hit your hand or frame with the ammo if you haven’t set up your shot properly.

The advantage of starting with a Lada Niva: you will know how powerful and temperamental powerful and temperamental is but at least you will have more background knowledge experience muscle memory strength etc etc to control it.
That’s very helpful info, and thanks for the majestic shooting style illustration above! That’s the technique I’ll aim for.

Do you think paracord string on the fork would be practical for separating the rubber from the metal?
 

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That s Not necessary and sounds abit awkward .
As Jim mentioned it's enough to go for a protection layer of TBG. ..and you can even do that with only the bandset itself by first wrap the bandset downwards the handle , then come back up into pulling direction and finish the wrap and tuck.
This will give you an unstreched layer under the streched active ones protecting them, increase Band lifetime .

This method also works for unsanded very rough forkends on natties..
You said actually you are not able to build your own, but it's only three cuts with a sharp treesaw,

:)
Give it a try
Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #14
A TBG layer it is!

I’ve been watching a bunch of how to-videos, but I am still confused about one thing: the necessity of the hand flip for a OTT with hammer grip held G style.

Is the MH frame such that it mandates an active (rather than relaxed) flip of the fork hand to avoid nastiness, or could it be shot static using anchor point and frame reference for aiming? I guess it would depend on the size of the ammo used, so let’s say a 16 mm marble using standard TBG (from proshot catapults). I guess this is ”just try it out yourself” territory though...

Perhaps I should wait with questions such as these until I’ve given it a go myself. Quite possibly the answer’s already there, but work and family life has me a bit sleep deprived currently. That’s why I love learning to shoot, no matter the tool. It’s a meditative process (until there’s suddenly a new hole in the wall that you cover up with tissue paper to hide it from your significant other)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Pouch twist, tweak, hand/wrist flip... I’m almost looking forward to RTS as I have no idea! ”The deep end” indeed

It’s on its way now.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Just have fun. It’s a hobby not a duty! Keep safe and it will be fun.
True!

By the way, would you mind pasting some links to your videos here? They demonstrate technique clearly as I recall, but I don’t remember where I saw them, YT perhaps.
 
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