Look what I found + bonus!

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by AngelicScars, Dec 3, 2013.

  1. AngelicScars

    AngelicScars MILF of the board

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    I was checking out our bushes today and found this!!
    [​IMG]

    There isn't much of a bush left, but it will grow back. My husband tried to help and I told him I can cut my own damn forks.
    So, what do I do now?! Can it stay like this(like for a week)? Do I take the bark off and then dry it out? Walk me through the steps, I'm actually attempting to make my first slingshot! :eek:
    Now for the bonus, I built this today. I still need to cement it and get the sheet up there a little better, but for the most part it is done! I'm excited! PLUS, my ammo came today, so I'm ready. :D
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Brazilviking

    Brazilviking Thread Hijacker

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    wow!!! Nice for both!
    Remove the bark, put in the microwave and go for 1 minute cicles in medium potency. after 5 to 15 cicles, it should be dry (it really depends on the wood)
    you can shape it now...kife, saw, power tools, see what you have! I like putting it over a paper and taking the shape so I can design the sling inside the silhouette.
    Sanding from 80 grit to 400 usually is a good begining, and later some lineseed oil or other finish!
    Check the pictures!

    Let me know if you have any doubt!
     

    Attached Files:


  3. AngelicScars

    AngelicScars MILF of the board

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    Oh nice! And thanks for the help! I was just going to keep it natural, I don't think I'm skilled enough to try to cut out something like that yet.
     
  4. BeMahoney

    BeMahoney Builder of things

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    that bug

    Hey Angelic!

    remember this day!- tomorrow is the day after!-
    AFTER being bitten by building bug! Don´t worry!-

    "Können kommt von Machen"

    "Skill derives from Doing"-

    You will from now on be a slingshot artista! :)

    I like that!

    Best regards,

    Be
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2013
  5. JohnKrakatoa

    JohnKrakatoa Loudest boom on Earth

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    Its not so hard actually. Just get a half round rasp and rasp in some curves :) Atleast shape the handle a bit coz its thick.

    Also you CAN leave it be for a week or even longer with bark, so it dries naturally. You have plenty of extra wood on each end so you dont have to fear cracks. But microwave is faster(i dont have any exp with it so...).
     
  6. Slagskimmer Mike

    Slagskimmer Mike thinks TBG smells better than roses

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    Good find, and nice work on the backstop.

    Nothing to fear when it comes to shaping the handle. Just take small ammounts of wood away --equally one side and then the other. It helps me to pencil centerlines longways down from fork to butt, easier to see symmetry.
    When you grip it and your hand feels strong and powerful--there you are.

    For hammergrip, your index fingertip should almost touch the meat of your palm as it wraps around.

    Keep us posted.:)
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2013
  7. rock slinger

    rock slinger I rarely shoot rocks!

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    Deffinetly keep it natural. Microwave it as BV said, or leave it bark on in the basement to dry for at least a month. The microwave risks cracks. Then just use a sharp knife and carve. I would suggest starting from 60 grit sandpaper if you carved it with a knife though. It will take more wood off, and even out your cuts. Natral slingshots also provide a good grip for finger wrap and thumb brace if that is how you shoot.
     
  8. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    AS, I recently learned how addictive building these things are. And it's really not hard. Use good rasps to shape it and go by feel. The wood will tell you what to do if you let it.

    -Wild Bill
     
  9. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    Nice find. Lots of ways to approach this. I've done microwave drying myself without any cracks with a variety of different woods. As BV suggests, do it at 50% power or less, in short bursts. I always pull mine out and give it a rest if it gets too hot - sometimes letting it rest overnight and resuming drying the next day. I would suggest leaving the bark on myself during drying, but that's just my preference. I would also recommend weighing the fork before you dry it - you should weigh it periodically as you dry it, when it stops dropping in weight, you know you're pretty dry. I have experienced a drop in weight of anywhere from 30 to 40% of the fork weight during drying. I also wrap it in a paper towel - as the fork gets dryer, you'll notice the paper towel getting dryer as less moisture comes from the fork. Leave the forks long during this process so if they crack you can keep the cracks away from the part you want to use, then cut it down later.

    If you're uncomfortable going with a design like BV shows (nice design, by the way), then stick with a simpler shape. Rasp, file, sand, carve, all good ways to get started. You'll probably start to get a feel for how you want it to look as you dig into the wood. Just take off little bits at a time, you can always take off more if you need to. Test it for fit in your hand. And always look at the great creations others have made here for inspiration. There are some really great craftspeople here that do wonders with naturals, some with little more than a knife.
     
  10. Jeremy

    Jeremy Senior member who totally rocks a pink Scout! Pink

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    Damn nice on both.
     
  11. kohlqez

    kohlqez Accident-Prone

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    The secret to making naturals slings, at least for me, is definitely rasps, files, and sandpaper. I've only made 1 1/2 though. Should finish and make that a nice round 2 by the end of the week, then it's on to boardcuts and such for a while. (I just got a table saw) after that I'm going to attempt a micarta or 2.

    BV was that fork dry when you were carving it?
     
  12. AngelicScars

    AngelicScars MILF of the board

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    Thanks everyone for the help!
    Would it be possible to let it air dry some and use the microwave to dry it the rest of the way, or would raise the risk of cracks?
    What would be a good carving knife? Would the same knife work well to remove the bark?
     
  13. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    Tools

    I've done the nuker method as described by BV and Withak with success without trying to air-dry it. Mind you, air-drying takes at least six months, with a year being better.

    Pictured are the only tools I've used so far in my builds. A hand saw to cut them, a small pocket knife for some bark stripping and three rasps. The knife I use is not ideal since it has a serrated portion that tends to gouge the wood if I'm not careful, so a smooth-bladed knife would probably be better. The rasps are of three sizes and have multiple purposes. Each is curved on one side and flat on the other, while also having a file edge on one side as well as a chisel tip. I bought this pack of rasps for $20.00 at a local home improvement store (Lowes).

    The rasps are by far the most important. The three sizes of curves allow me to make different indentations and depths to fit my hand as I see fit. They do not require much pressure to accomplish the forming- in fact, it better to not apply a lot of pressure as that tends to make deep scars that will take awhile to sand out. What I've done is rasped a bit, looked at the wood, held it to see where it feels a bit uncomfortable, and then worked on those points until it felt good in my grip.

    After it's formed, sand it through the grits. I start at 120 (though starting at 60 is probably better) and then go to 220, 330 and finally 600. After that, put on whatever finish you'd like- I've been using boiled linseed oil thus far and it's done a good job.

    -WIld Bill
     

    Attached Files:

  14. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    I agree with Bill on the rasps, you can get them fairly cheap and they are a really fast way to do material removal and to form the rough shape. When I use a knife, my preferred is the non-serrated blade on my old Leatherman tool. It cuts really well and holds an edge longer than some of my other knives. As long as the blade is sharp and you can safely keep a good grip on it, it should work. Preferably, carve away from yourself at first if you've not done much carving.

    Oh, and one more thing on the rasps, I find it very useful to put the fork in a vise if you have one, so you can use more force and use both hands (one on the handle, one on the end) to better guide the rasp. It works really well that way.

    If you want to see a good example of working with a knife, check out some of Tilia's recent videos.
     
  15. AngelicScars

    AngelicScars MILF of the board

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    Thanks guys, you rock! I'll look into getting rasps. I have several knives around here, I'll see which one will do the job best. :)
     
  16. pelleteer

    pelleteer Middle Aged Delinquent

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    Great catch box. :cool: Although I should be upset over you making me look bad. Here I am all proud of my store bought one, and you go and hand build your own. :mad::D
     
  17. dolomite

    dolomite Banned

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    Nice find Jen! I dig the catch box as well. You may want to add a towel to the sheet, hang it so it can move freely-it will last longer this way. For knives, as E said, the leatherman tool blade works good. I also love my new opinel, it has a twist lock that makes it nearly as rigid as a fixed blade. They have really affordable models too(under $20). Start with 80g sandpaper then 220,400,600. Spend a lot of time with each grit, sand each papers marks with the next grit till they are gone.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2013
  18. VWscooby

    VWscooby Senior Member

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    Nice find! What type of wood is it?
    Everyone has given some great suggestions. As far as drying goes I leave it for a week somewhere warm then do the the microwave thing but with the bark on because I find it cracks less. That may be in my head though! Even if it does crack, dont panic! Bit of sawdust and epoxy and you are good to go. The main thing is......have fun! :)
     
  19. AngelicScars

    AngelicScars MILF of the board

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    That, I am not sure of, it's from a big bush with green leaves. :p
    I can try to figure it out.
    Question, should I use the handsaw again to shorten the handle and fork or something else?
     
  20. AngelicScars

    AngelicScars MILF of the board

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    Alright, so I did some searching and the closest thing to what looks like I have is some sort of boxwood, I could be wrong though. When it's not raining and wet out, I can snap a pic of the bushes to let you guys determine that (they were already planted when we bought the place).