Knife Making Thread

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Yamroll, Oct 5, 2011.

  1. Yamroll

    Yamroll New Member

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    So I've recently gotten into bladesmithing and found it to be a pretty rewarding hobby.<br><br>I just finished the majority of the work on my latest project, a 9" blade diferentially hardened Bowie knife.<br><br><br><br>Looking at some options for my next project, thinking a 12" blade camp chopper.<br><br>Anyone else into making knives? Or have any interest in it?
     
  2. 3bears

    3bears New Member

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    i do, but it's only from someone with a boundless enthusiasm and very little skill lol<br><br><img src="http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc317/urban_paladin/2011-03-14185515.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br><br><img src="http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc317/urban_paladin/2011-03-03174650.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br><br>I treated myself to this last month but I haven't been able to find the time to start yet...<br><br><img src="http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc317/urban_paladin/2011-09-12151429.jpg" border="0" alt="">
     

  3. Kyl

    Kyl New Member

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    Knives! I love making knives. Differential hardening, my favorite. Lets see some pics. <br>I made my first knife in 1990 and started fooling around with differential hardening (clay resist hardening) about 2000. Here is the first knife I tried the clay resist on. It's made from a 22mm Chrome-Vanadium wrench, series 6135 steel. there is a secret knife making technique in this one. If you guys are interested I'll describe it.<br><img src="http://img7.imageshack.us/img7/1158/homemadeknives1.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br><br>these two matching knives were made 9 years apart. Both are from O1 steel with Sambar stag handles. The small one is a traditional hardening and temper but the large one is a differential clay resist unit. <br><br><img src="http://img255.imageshack.us/img255/4254/homemadeknives2.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br><br>this last one is my favorite heavy chopper. I have used it quite a bit for brush clearing and tree chopping. I have never had to resharpen it. It's styled after a traditional Chinese design with a clay resist differential hardening. the blade has a chisel bevel and is made from air hardening steel from an older, non-laminated, Oregon brand chain saw bar. The blue spacer is Corian and the handle is Dog Wood. The tsuba is brass. <br><img src="http://img405.imageshack.us/img405/8479/homemadeknives3.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br><br>Keep at it. If you keep making them, each one will be better than the last. Cheers
     
  4. Yamroll

    Yamroll New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>3bears wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">i do, but it's only from someone with a boundless enthusiasm and very little skill lol<br><br>
    </td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br><br><br>That's where I'm at! Haha, putting a lot of effort into learning as much as I can though. Really need a couple new tools, but, for my limited equipment, I feel pretty good about my projects.<br><br><br>These are my first two.<br><img src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v391/Zeppo/Knives/First2.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br>The small skinner was my first. It's S35VN stainless steel, 4" blade with a Tiger G10 handle. 1/8" thick blade.<br>The Bowie is my latest. It's 1084 carbon steel. As I mentioned, it's differentially hardened. The hamon is far from spectacular, the contributing factors to that are 1084 isn't the best for visible hamons, I have a lack of skill, experience and equipment, and I had to use furnace cement rather than real clay. The steel is 3/16" thick, and the blade is 9" long. Still a ways off, needs some serious polishing and cleaning up. It still has some grinder gouging, despite the corrosion liability they present, I might leave them. I kind of like the look of roughness on this one.<br>Here is the detail on the hamon. Forgive the shoddy photography. My skills in that department are lacking.<br><img src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v391/Zeppo/Knives/Hamondetail1.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br><br><br>I've just ordered up 2 new pieces of steel. One is 2" x 1/4" x 18" 1075, planning to make a pretty brutal chopper out of that. The other is 2" x 3/16" x 18", just to have on hand. I may wind up making a Japanese style straight razor from parts of that.<br>Also ordered up some Kydex for sheath making. Next step before much else is to construct a makeshift forge. Using the livingroom fireplace is far from ideal.<br><br><br><br><br><br><br>Kyl, I dig your work, definitely. The stag horn handles are awesome and the chopper looks pretty damned hardcore. Somewhat similar to what I'm envisioning for mine.</span>
     
  5. Kyl

    Kyl New Member

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    Thanks Yamroll, good job on your knives. Furnace cement? That's great, never thought of that. A buddy of mine and I worked out a three part clay recipe that is cheap and easy. We used Mullite clay (Calcined Kyanite) and pure Silica powder from a ceramic arts supplier and homemade charcoal. All super cheap. We ground it all flour fine and mixed it (1:1:1) with minimal water. It's probably not the best but it works. Getting the blades really degreased it important and drying out the clay thoroughly with progressively higher heat until all the water is expelled. Otherwise little pieces of the clay would pop off when you quench. Do you apply your resist in a wavy pattern? How many layers? Have you tried a double hamon? The Chinese Heavy Chopper has a double hamon. One in the middle of the bevel and one behind the bevel. Unfortunately they're not visible as I just polished them away, but they were quite pronounced immediately after hardening. Do you use a magnet to determine the critical temperature? Good luck.<br><br>3bears, Sweet. Boundless enthusiasm it all it takes man. What sort of wood is that?
     
  6. Yamroll

    Yamroll New Member

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    I had originally intended to use a mixture of clay, lye and charcoal but I actually had the furnace cement laying around from a prior project and it worked out pretty well. Adhered nicely to the blade. It's fairly viscous so it's hard not to apply it in a somewhat wavy pattern. I had thought of using masking tape to create a more uniform look, but I kind of like the look of the organic pattern. I haven't thought of a double hamon, I might save that for future projects.<br><br><br>I did use the magnet to determine critical on the 1084 Bowie because it's a eutectoid steel so the magnet would be accurate enough. The S35VN was a bit trickier, since it's austenite temperature is closer to 1950 F. That one I had to gauge based on colour. To be honest, it was a poor choice for a first blade, but I lucked into a pretty good result. It's reasonably hard, and not too grainy. <br><br><br>One thing I realized doing the bowie was the livingroom fireplace isn't going to cut it much longer, especially if I am doing longer blades. A Canadian chain retailer that sells... everything (primarily automotive stuff, at least originally, but have expanded into home, garden, tools, outdoor and sporting goods) sells a portable hunting wood stove (13" w x 23" t x 24" l) that I'm going to get for my new forge. I'm going to put a layer of clay and sand mixture on the bottom and reaching up the sides to form a bit of a crucible so I can get it up to higher heat without worrying too much, and install a trap door on the front for handles to protrude out on longer blades. Going to either pump air in with bellows or a hairdryer, though bellows would be preferable I think.
     
  7. Ryan Wigglesworth

    Ryan Wigglesworth Senior Member

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    This is great, I haven't tried anything like this yet, but this stuff is nice work guys! I especially like the wrench shank!! Do tell me more <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1"><img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1"><img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_question.gif" alt="Question" longdesc="17">
     
  8. Yamroll

    Yamroll New Member

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    Hahah, I'm working on building a new forge right now (waiting for some cement to dry) so I wont have to use the livingroom fireplace anymore, but as soon as my new steel arrives, I'm planning on making a youtube tutorial on making knives with basic tools and a fireplace.
     
  9. Ryan Wigglesworth

    Ryan Wigglesworth Senior Member

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    I'll be waiting <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"> I have seen a couple utube vids of similar knifemaking stuff, looks like fun!
     
  10. Yamroll

    Yamroll New Member

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    It's a lot of fun and very rewarding. I found a place up in Cremona, AB (about an hour away from me, though I still have them ship to my home) that sells nice quality knife steel and handle material, very reasonably. The Bowie for example cost around $11 for the steel, $6 for the handle, and the rest I got from Rona and Canadian tire.<br><br><br>My forge is nearing completion. I went in an entirely different direction than I had originally thought. <br><br><img src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v391/Zeppo/Knives/005.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br><br>It's actually a steel wheelbarrow. There's a 30" steel pipe running the length (it protrudes at both ends). One end is capped, one end has an adapter to be connected to a blowdryer or bellows (not pictured). The length of the pipe is perforated to form a tuyere. I laid firebricks set in furnace cement around the tuyere to form a basin. The sides will just be filled up with sand. <br><br>The idea is, you lay charcoal and/or wood in the brick basin and light them. Then by pumping air in through the tuyere, the coals are stoked, and will get the knife up to critical. I'm going to make a small lid next, just to refract some heat back into the system. <br><br>Not ideal, but it was cheap to make, and beats the hell out of a fireplace.
     
  11. Kyl

    Kyl New Member

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    I like the wheel barrow. I would go with a blower. I have used a bellows and a hand crank blower and an electric blower, well, blows them all away. Ha.<br><br>Moment ago I spent an hour writing up a nice post about making knives from wrench steel and when I hit the Preview button I was redirected to the sign in page, completely deleting the post. FUCK!!! that's totally annoying. What is the deal with that? Sorry guys. I'm so frustrated I gonna go shoot something.
     
  12. Yamroll

    Yamroll New Member

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    Haha, man. That sucks. Hard.<br>Well, I'm at home and bored (can't test fire the forge for at least another 24 h) so I thought I'd write up how I made my first 2 knives in the livingroom fireplace. It'll be a monotemper full tang knife with the design beyond that kind of up to you. Going to cover tools and materials in one post, then the actual process in a second one. Remember, I am just a hobbyist. This is what I have found to work, but it may be far from the optimal way of doing things, and not everything I say may be totally correct. Take this information as coming from someone with marginally more experience than the total neophyte, on how he managed to make 2 functional knives without major problems.<br><br><br><strong><i>*Disclaimer*<br>Working with red hot metals, ESPECIALLY inside your living room is dangerous, and probably pretty damn stupid. I advise you NOT to try this, and accept no responsibility if you burn your house down, lose an eye or singe your moustache off. Or anything else.<br>ALSO:<br>In designing and constructing your knife, BE AWARE OF KNIFE LAWS IN YOUR REGION. Don't make anything that can get you into trouble with the law, and don't carry your knife around if it's against the law in your region.<br>ALL the standard rules of safety concerning tools, knives and fire apply throughout this entire process. Be respectful of these rules, or you may find yourself seriously injured or worse. <br>The responsibility of attempting home bladesmithing should you choose to attempt it, and in owning the knife you create are your own. <br></i></strong><br><br><strong><i>Materials:</i></strong><br><br><strong>-Knife Steel.</strong> For your first knife, I ABSOLUTELY recommend 1084. Forgiving in the heat treat and quench, and pretty cheap so it doesn't sting too badly if your screw it up. Remember to factor the handle and the blade into your purchase, it's all gonna be from one continuous piece). You'll probably want to leave 5-6" for a handle, after that blade length is up to you.<br><br><strong>-Handle material</strong>. You can use wood, stabilized wood, resin synthetics or other (aluminum, Kraton, etc.). This one is kind of up to you. Wood will be the easiest to work, but a synthetic like Micarta or G10 are excellent on the durability front. A good rule of thumb for handles is they'll be 5"-6" long<br><strong>-Epoxy. </strong>Slower setting stuff is my preference, it gives you more time to work<br><strong>-Pin/Bar stock </strong>(I use a 1/4" Brass rod I got from the hardware store)<br>-<strong>Some miscellaneous stuff. </strong>Water, vinegar, waxed paper.<br><br><br><strong><i>Tools:</i></strong><br><strong>-A Dremel, a metal cutting bandsaw, or a BADASS jigsaw</strong>. You need to cut the shape of your knife out of the steel stock, unless you want a knife that's just a rectangle (you don't). You'll also want to keep in mind that you WILL need to have extra cutting discs or blades on hand. On my Bowie I think I went through about 12 metal cutting dremel discs. <br>I hate to say it but I can't really think of any way around this one. You could try and slice bit by bit off with a hacksaw, and file it out, but, it would take so long you'd be better off getting a minimum wage job, working, and using your wages to buy a knife. <br><br><strong>-Files</strong>. You probably want a fast cutting flat file, a slow cutting flat file, some variety of half round file. Go for ones that are at least 9" long, it'll be a pain in the ass otherwise. A set of needle files for detail work might also help. <br><strong><br>-A drill press.</strong><br> You could probably do this with a hand held power drill, but it would be a lot more difficult. A bonus with a drill press is you can get a sanding drum attachment and use it in the shaping process. Don't skimp on drill bits. Buy ones that are intended for working with steel or you'll just break them or dull them to being useless and wind up needing like 5. I think the only drillbits you'll really need is one that matches the diameter of the rod you bought for materials, and maybe a bradpoint bit that is the same diameter as your steel is thick.<br><br><strong>-Sharpening stones.</strong> Or some breed of knife sharpener. Kind of pointless to make a knife if you can't sharpen it after, right? <br><br><br><strong>-A router</strong> (this one is actually totally optional). I just used a laminate trimmer bit to help cut the handle scales identically. <br><br><strong>-A bench grinder</strong>. I didn't have one for my first knife, I picked one up for $40 on sale from Canadian tire and I am SO glad I did. You CAN do all the shaping with hand files, but... this will do it in 4% of the time.<br><strong>-A fireplace</strong>. If you have an outdoor woodburning fireplace, I totally recommend that. Much safer. Just be sure to have plenty of water on hand to put out the fire (derp). My indoor one burns wood and is equipped with a natural gas log lighter. The log lighter isn't necessary, just helps a little.<br><strong>-Bellows, hair dryer, or fan.</strong> For my first 2 knives, I just parked a small electric fan by the fireplace and used it to stoke the coals. Worked no prob. I'm assuming if you have a fireplace, you have the usual set of tools (all you really need are a poker and the tongs).<br><strong>-Various clamps</strong>. A small drillpress vice helps too.<br>-Sandpaper. Make sure to get wet/dry stuff, preferably for metalworking. The extent you want to polish your finished blade dictates how high you want to get up in grit. If you want a mirror finish, expect to go 50, 80, 150, 220, 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3200, 4000, maybe beyond.<br><strong>-Buffer.</strong> My shop has a 14" buffing arbor for polishing guitars, I did wind up using it on the blade and handle. Not necessary, but nice if you have it.<br><br><br><br><br><strong><i>Safety gear:</i></strong><br><strong><br>-Goggles</strong>. No brainer here.<br><strong>-Dust masks</strong>. Especially if working with Micarta or G10, the dust is potentially hazardous. <br><strong>-A face shield</strong>. Probably won't need this unless you're using a grinder.<br><strong>-Gloves</strong>. Might not hurt to have 2 different sets, one for the shaping and polishing, one for the heat treating stage. Remember when your knife comes out of the fire, it will be over 800 C. I don't even want to imagine how bad that could burn you if you dropped it out of the tongs and went to grab it in a panic.<br>-<strong>Fire extinguisher</strong>. This should be near at hand during all the steps involving heat.<br><br><br><strong><i>Sourcing:</i></strong><br><br>For knive steel and handle materials, check out <a href="http://www.knifekits.com" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">www.knifekits.com</a> (for the USA), <a href="http://www.knifemaker.ca" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">www.knifemaker.ca</a> (Canada).<br>The rest of the world, you're on your own for sourcing materials.<br><br><br>I think that does it for tools and materials. The actual process should be soon (somewhere between an hour or two, to this time tomorrow, I might get bored and wander off...)
     
  13. Yamroll

    Yamroll New Member

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    <i><strong>BEFORE YOU START THIS,<br>-READ MY DISCLAIMER AGAIN. <br>-READ ALL OF THE STEPS AND UNDERSTAND THEM FULLY BEFORE DOING ANYTHING<br>-ASK QUESTIONS WHEN IN DOUBT<br></strong></i><i><strong>-IF YOU'RE EVER UNSURE OF SOMETHING YOU'RE ABOUT TO ATTEMPT, DON'T. <br></strong></i><br><br><i><strong>Instructions:</strong></i><br><strong>Step 1: </strong>Ok. You've got your piece of steel. It'll probably be somewhat oxidized or dirty when it arrives, so start by sanding it roughly to get some of that off. This will make drawing out your design onto the knife easier. I drew mine on with a sharpie. Probably wouldn't hurt to first draw out the design on paper first. Remember, this is a true full tang knife, so your design should look like what the knife will look like completed, handle and all, in one continuous piece. <br><strong>Step 2: </strong>Cutting it out. Now, some guys will use a drill to put some holes around the perimeter of the design, so they can cut it out in a connect the dots style. I never did this, but it's something you can do. How exactly you cut it out really depends on what tool you've chosen to use. I'm assuming you're somewhat familiar with the use of that tool, if you're not, familiarize yourself first. Remember you're working with steel, so go slow and careful, and take time to let your tools and steel cool off from time to time. Try to always cut slightly outside of the design you've drawn, you can always file or grind it down to the exact shape afterwards, it will turn out nicer that way. <br><strong>Step 3: </strong>So now you should have the basic shape of the knife cut out, only, it's not ground at all so it's uniform thickness all the way around. What you want to do know is, along what will become the cutting edge of the knife, mark the exact center. I do this by taking a brad point drill bit, laying the knife and the drill bit on a flat surface, and tracing the tip of the drillbit along the edge. If you do this with enough pressure, it will leave you with a line scored into the steel that marks the exact halfway point of the blades thickness. This will tell you how far to grind and or file the knife on each side, hopefully the bevels on each side will meet at this line. Depending on the design of the knife, you may also need to mark the point the bevel will reach on the side of the blade, do this with a sharpie, but be sure it's identical on both sides of the blade. If your entire blade is to be flat ground, you don't need to worry about this, the spine of the knife will be that line. (I feel I haven't described this that well, if you have questions, feel free to ask). <br><strong>Step 4: </strong>Now that you have your lines put in for the bevel, you can start grinding or filing. The idea is you want to file it until the bevel of the knife starts at either the spine of the knife or the bevel line you've drawn, and stops at the line you scored into the edge. This takes a while, be patient. Try to make sure the angle of the bevel is fairly consistent along the length of the blade, and on both sides of the knife.<br><br><strong>Step 5: </strong>So now what you should have is a knife, in a very loose sense of the word. Not only is it cut out to the shape you want the final product to be, but the bevels should meet at the very center of the edge, it may even be sharp enough to cut, but you're not done. Next, I would start sanding the blade. Lubricate the sandpaper with some water, it'll slow it down, but keep it from leaving deep gouges. At this stage, we're not looking for a final polish, just trying to get rid of any deep gouges from the filing process. Once the blade is hardened, those will be very difficult to get out. Don't worry about going above about 220 grit sandpaper here.<br><br><strong>Step 6: </strong>The last thing you want to do is drill out the holes where the handle pins will be. 2 will probably be sufficient. It's a good idea to do this now, because after heat treat, the steel may be too hard to drill (at least efficiently). Check out the pictures of the knives I made earlier in the thread to get an idea for where these pins should go. Make sure your drillbit matches the diameter of your pin material. <br><br><br><strong>Step 7: </strong>Ok, we've reached the heat treat stage. Up until this point, the instructions would work for more or less any steel. From this point on though, the instructions will be tailored to 1084 steel. If you're using a different steel, feel free to ask how I would heat treat, quench and temper it, or try google. <br>I'm going to start by explaining the idea behind heat treat, quench and temper.<br><br>The steel as it is right now is comparatively very soft and ductile. You could hack away at stuff all day with it, but it wouldn't hold an edge at all, so it's barely a knife. What you need to do is harden it, so you can sharpen it, and have it maintain that edge.<br><br>To do this, we <i>heat treat</i> it, and <i>quench</i> it. By heating the steel to a certain point, the iron and carbon atoms reach a phase called austenite, which is essentially a solid solution. The iron forms a crystalline type structure, and the carbon atoms can move around within it. Once it's reached this state, what happens next depends on how it cools. If it cools quickly, the crystalline structure is preserved, and the steel becomes very hard, although brittle. If it cools very slowly, it returns to its previous form, where it is very soft and ductile. This process is called annealing. By quenching the steel, we are cooling it quickly in a controlled state, hopefully resulting in a very hard blade. Cooling it too quickly can leave the blade in a very stressed out state though, so we have to choose a quench medium accordingly.<br><br>Immediately after the quench (and I do mean immediately), we want to <i>temper</i> the blade. This will soften it a little, but reduce stresses in the blade, and make it less brittle. Essentially, at the temper stage, we trade off a bit of hardness for a LOT of toughness. It's a good deal.<br><br>This step will be preparing your heat treat, your quench, and your temper. For the heat treat, start a fire in your fireplace. The ideal situation for the heat treat will be to have a pile of hot coals at the bottom of the fireplace that you can stick the knife blade into. The coals will work a LOT better than burning logs. It may take a while for the fire to reach this point, and you may need to feed it a lot of wood. Be patient.<br><br>While the fire is getting to the right point, preheat your oven to 400 degrees F, middle rack. Next, you want to prepare a quench. For 1084, I used hot water (about 80 C). Don't think "oh, I'll use cool/cold water to cool it faster and make an even sharper knife!". You'll end up with a BROKEN knife, it might even explode in the quench. That's bad. Remember this is for 1084 steel, some steels need to be air quenched, some need to be oil quenched. Ask if you're not sure. For a container, I used an old plastic toolbox (waterproof, of course). Ideally, you want to be able to submerge the entire blade at once, pushing the longitudinal edge in first. You CAN go tip first, it's not as good though. <br><br><strong>Step 8: </strong>Ok, your fire's looking right, your quench medium is at the ready, and your oven is preheated. Have a magnet at the ready. Use the tongs, stick the knife blade into your bed of hot coals. You may want to turn your fan or bellows onto it, this will raise the temperature. It may not be necessary. Be aware this can cause bits of ash and crap to blow back at you, so be careful! Keep an eye on it, you can even pull it out with the tongs to check on it at times, just don't have it out of the fire for too long. Always put the tongs at the handle, not anywhere on the blade. What we want here is for the knife to reach <i>critical. </i>This is that austenite state we mentioned. How do you know when it's reached critical? There are a few ways to do this. One is by colour. This is tricky, I don't advise it unless you're VERY experienced with red hot steel (I'm not, guessing you aren't either). The other is with a magnet. Luckily, when the knife reaches critical, it's no longer magnetic! Handy, right? So, when you take it out of the fire, check the blade with the magnet. When it's ready, no part of the blade will be magnetic anymore. If you pull it out and it's not ready, stick it back in. If you pull it out and you're satisfied it's critical, you're ready to quench. Some steels do best when they sit in the fire at critical for a little while. I left my 1084 blade in for about 1.5-2 minutes after I was satisfied it had reached critical temperature, and it turned out fine. Probably should have been more like 5-10 minutes. The concern with leaving it too long is the steel can become quite grainy. Stainless steels usually need to sit longer. Depending on the steel, and the design of the knife, you may want to go a little beyond the point of no longer being magnetic. Keep an eye on the colour when it ceases to be magnetic. at that point it will likely be a dull red. Taking it a shade brighter will result in a harder edge. Be aware this will sacrifice toughness. <br><br>SO, once you're sure, grab the handle of the knife with your tongs, and quench the bastard. Lower it into your quenching medium, agitating it slightly. You want to drop the temperature of the blade down from the 800C-850C it was at to about 80-90 here. Just wait until the water isn't boiling around it anymore, than maybe a little longer. After that you can let it air cool. A kitchen cooling rack will work, just keep it away from anything heat sensitive (including your skin). Wait until it's cool enough to handle, it doesn't have to be room temperature. Don't burn yourself, stick to the side of caution when in doubt.<br><br>When it's cool enough to handle, into the 400F oven for 1 hour. When the times up, use pliers or tongs to put it back on that cooling rack. Let it cool nice and slowly. Be careful, don't drop a 400 degree knife on your toes or your floor, or onto your precious antique dynamite collection. <br><br>Throughout this whole process you're probably looking at your knife that you sanded earlier and noticing it looks all gray and cruddy now. Guess what...<br><br><strong>Step 9: </strong>Hopefully your heat treat went well, and your knife is still intact and didn't bend at some weird angle or break during the process (this can happen even when you've done everything by the book. Some steel pieces are just weird. My apologies). Now you can start polishing your blade. Hopefully you took the time to get any serious gouges or imperfections out of it before heat treating, because' they'll be a PAIN to get out now that the steel is hardened (in fact, trying to get it out now with the file may just ruin your file). Start by wetsanding with your 50 grit, then 80, then 150... you get the idea... until you reach your final grit (this depends on how polished you want it. It's worth noting, especially with carbon steels, the more polished the blade is, the more resistant to corrosion it will be). Mind your fingers, don't cut yourself.<br><br><strong>Step 10: </strong>OK, now you've got a largely finished knife with no handle. Take your chosen handle materials, and trace out the shape of the handle TWICE. Cut them out, leave them a little big. At this point, I like to take some double stick tape and tape them together, and sand/file them until they are identical and match up nicely to the handle of the knife. Take them apart, and one at a time, double stick tape or clamp them to the knife. This is the time to line them up perfectly, take the time. Once they're stuck/attached together and perfectly in line, you want to drill. The reason we stuck the handle scale to the knife is, we're going to go through the hole we already put in the handle in step 6, with the same drill bit, and through the handle scale. This way, the handle scale is perfectly lined up with the handle of the knife, the holes will be perfectly lined up, so when we do final assembly, nothing is wonky. Do this for both holes on both handle scales.<br><br><br><br><strong>Step 11: </strong>Cut out 2 lengths of the pin/bar stock you have. Each piece should be a touch longer than the total thickness of the knife and scales are thick. Clean up the ends with a file. Don't worry TOO much if you can't push them into the holes you drilled with the file, you'll probably need to tap them in with a hammer. This will result in a better knife in the end anyway.<br><br><strong>Step 12: </strong>For this step, you should have the following at the ready:<br>-Knife (derrrr)<br>-2 handle scales, shaped to match the knifes handle, and with matching holes.<br>-2 pins. If you took my advice these will probably be 1/4" brass, and total length just a touch longer than the knife and the 2 scales are thick.<br>-Epoxy<br>-Something to mix the epoxy in<br>-A hammer<br>-A hard heavy surface to hammer on. I used an iron weight on a concrete floor. <br>-1 or 2 clamps, preferably ones that wont marr the surface of the handle scales. <br>-Vinegar<br>-Some clean rags or paper towel.<br>-Some waxed paper (optional I guess)<br><br>Mix up your epoxy. Be aware of the working time, it should tell you on the container. Once it's good ad mixed, spread some on either side of the knife's tang, don't be shy, you don't want this handle to come apart. Carefully press a handle scale on either side of the tang, carefully lining them up. Use the hammer to tap the pins through the holes. Ideally, you'll have a little bit of in protruding at both sides of the assembled handle. Using some vinegar on a rag or paper towel, wipe up any excess epoxy, paying close attention to the outside of the handle scales. You don't want your clamps to wind up epoxied to your finished knife, it's not a very practical addition. You can use some waxed paper if you're worried about this. Clamp the whole thing together, nice and tight. <br><br>REMEMBER: If you're using a carbon steel, it can rust. If you've just wiped vinegar all over your knife to clean up excess epoxy, it WILL rust. Make sure you clean that up with some water and dry it off nicely before you let the epoxy cure or you'll wind up having to clean up rust off your freshly assembled and polished knife.<br><br><strong>Step 13: </strong>Once the epoxy is cured completely, remove the clamps. You're almost there. You've still got little bits of pins sticking out. Taking care not to rough up the handle scales too badly, file the protrusions down. Once that's done, you'll want to contour and shape the handle scales so they're comfortable to hold. More filing and sanding.<br><strong>Step 14: </strong>You should essentially be done at this stage. It's at your discretion to fine tune any issues you see, these could be polishing, cleaning, that sort of thing. <br><strong>Step 15: </strong>Sharpen. You'll likely want to start with a coarser stone than usual, and it may take quite a bit of time. Remember, you're establishing the first true edge this knife has ever had, so take due care. Once it's been sharpened, rub the blade and any exposed metal down with oil and you're done!<br><strong><br>Hope that all made sense. If you have questions, feel free to ask, I'll try and respond to them quickly. Also, use google, there are a lot of great resources out there.<br><br>Good luck!<br></strong>
     
  14. Yamroll

    Yamroll New Member

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    Test fired the forge yesterday. Well, I fired it to cure the cement and decided I had to find out how well it worked on some scrap steel. <br><br><br>It works beautifully. Total cost, $160 CAD for the construction, and about $1.75 for enough charcoal to fire it (probably would have time to heat treat 10 knives, if you really wanted, for every firing).
     
  15. Yamroll

    Yamroll New Member

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    A good link if you're thinking about trying knife making but don't know where to start:<br><br><a href="http://www.knife-making-supplies.net/cheap-knife-tutorial.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.knife-making-supplies.net/cheap-knife-tutorial.html</a>
     
  16. porcelanowy

    porcelanowy New Member

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    Yellow <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"><br>I like to go cheap where I can <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15"> but it should look good at the end <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"><br><br><br>Mora knives &ndash; excellent for pimping <br><a href="http://images28.fotosik.pl/166/17a399c102a2baa2.jpg" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img src="http://images29.fotosik.pl/165/6c2fdb647190475d.jpg" border="0" alt=""></a><br><img src="http://images28.fotosik.pl/166/17a399c102a2baa2.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br>This one with &ldquo;vintage look&rdquo; <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"><br><img src="http://img69.imageshack.us/img69/7864/mimg3982.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br><img src="http://img687.imageshack.us/img687/6931/mimg3983.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br><br><br>Broken spring found on a street:<br><img src="http://img517.imageshack.us/img517/6004/mimg1815.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br>some heat:<br><img src="http://img517.imageshack.us/img517/6443/mimg1829.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br>some time<br>and hammering:<br><img src="http://img265.imageshack.us/img265/3258/mimg1847.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br><img src="http://img690.imageshack.us/img690/5530/mimg1853.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br>Work in progress <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"><br><br><br>What I have in house right now are two kitchen knives made out of scraps:<br><img src="http://img706.imageshack.us/img706/7820/img0726nb.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br>Upper one: carbon steel (broken blade from polish fellow knifemaker TLIM <a href="http://www.tlim.net/" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">www.tlim.net</a> ) , water buffalo, t-shirt <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15"> and<br>lapacho/ipe:<br><a target="_blank" href="http://theslingshotforum.forumotion.com/viewimage.forum?u=http://img199.imageshack.us/img199/9106/img0365ze.jpg"><img src="http://img193.imageshack.us/img193/3118/ulamek01.jpg" alt=""></a><br><a target="_blank" href="http://theslingshotforum.forumotion.com/viewimage.forum?u=http://img694.imageshack.us/img694/2963/img0430yw.jpg"><img src="http://img199.imageshack.us/img199/9106/img0365ze.jpg" alt=""></a><br><a target="_blank" href="http://theslingshotforum.forumotion.com/viewimage.forum?u=http://img853.imageshack.us/img853/7547/mimg0483.jpg"><img src="http://img694.imageshack.us/img694/2963/img0430yw.jpg" alt=""></a><br><a target="_blank" href="http://theslingshotforum.forumotion.com/viewimage.forum?u=http://img853.imageshack.us/img853/7547/mimg0483.jpg"><img src="http://img853.imageshack.us/img853/7547/mimg0483.jpg" alt=""></a><br>Lapacho/ipe - greate wood, hard, easy do polish, looks good <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"><br><img src="http://img97.imageshack.us/img97/5830/mimg0518.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br>Lower one: stainless steel, oak, aluminum from umbrella as pins <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"><br><img src="http://img832.imageshack.us/img832/724/img0705r.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br>and a CD spacer <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15"><br><img src="http://img687.imageshack.us/img687/8953/img0708k.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br><br><br>Temperatures dropped lately so I had to flee to my kitchen <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"><br><a target="_blank" href="http://theslingshotforum.forumotion.com/viewimage.forum?u=http://img98.imageshack.us/img98/6720/ulamek00.jpg"><img src="http://img98.imageshack.us/img98/6720/ulamek00.jpg" alt=""></a><br><br><br>Work to do: <br><img src="http://img714.imageshack.us/img714/5877/img0460vq.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br>Something I&rsquo;ve brought from polish knife forum <strong><a href="http://theslingshotforum.forumotion.com/knives.pl" class="postlink"></a>knives.pl</strong> gathering:<br><br><img src="http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/1961/img1244cs.jpg" border="0" alt=""><br><br><br>Cheers<br>Rafal<br>p.s. Sorry for the photos. To many I think&hellip; <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_wink.gif" alt="Wink" longdesc="15">
     
  17. 3bears

    3bears New Member

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    Rafal<br>p.s. Sorry for the photos. To many I think&hellip;<br><br>no such thing as too many!! amazing work <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2">
     
  18. Ahavy

    Ahavy New Member

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    amazing work, guys. knives making is something to catch my mind <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2">
     
  19. AESamuel

    AESamuel New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>3bears wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">
    <br>*snip<br><br>I treated myself to this last month but I haven't been able to find the time to start yet...<br><br>*snip*<br>
    </td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br><br>I've had one of those and made a great knife out of it.<br><br>This is it on the bottom:<br><br><img src="http://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/47745_465339557558_583782558_6892800_2326065_n.jpg" border="0" alt=""></span>
     
  20. Broken Images

    Broken Images New Member

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    I just recently got into making knives. Still learning how to shape and sharpen them<br>but all in all I like it. Very cool hobby