Importance of practice - A book recommendation

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by VWscooby, Jan 23, 2014.

  1. VWscooby

    VWscooby Senior Member

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    When you start any sport/hobby/pastime its very easy to get disheartened when you see people who have been doing it for years making it look easy. I was watching videos by Joerg, Arturo and Gamekeeper John and they were always in the back of my mind when I missed a shot.

    I recently got given a copy of a book by my stepdad called Bounce by Matthew Syed. Syed is a former world number 1 Table Tennis player who has come up with a really good way of looking at sport and any skill really.

    He basically says that there is no such thing as 'natural' talent and it all boils down to applied and relevant practice, and thats the important thing. The practice has to be structured. That is why JimRhodos newbie challenge is such a great idea for new shooters.


    Im not going to write an essay on the book but I thought it was really interesting (and easy to read, its not a dry, scientific text) especially with a few threads recently about levels of skill, practice etc and thought that some people would find it interesting :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2014

  2. JimRhodo

    JimRhodo Junior Member

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    Superb!

    I've just read it. It only takes a few minutes. If true even in part be very encouraged. Im not looking to be the next Bill Hayes but I do want to confidently hit what I aim at.

    And it's only applied relevant practice that will do it. And it will take a while to get there.

    Scooby thank you.

    In case anyone misses this post I'll put the link on mine. Wonderful stuff.
     
  3. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    Sounds like some good recommendations. I'm afraid far too many folks want to jump in to something new without giving it the time they need to learn and to develop some skill. I watch a lot of folks get very frustrated and give up on new things simply because they aren't instant masters of their new skill. My daughter is a good example. Last year I was working with her to get the training wheels off her bicycle. When she couldn't do it the first few times, she got frustrated and wanted to quit. In the kindest way I could, I wouldn't let her. I knew if she stuck with it, she would do just fine. And, after a while, she did, and was tremendously excited as well.

    But it's one thing to guide and encourage someone else. When it's you that you're training, it's even harder. I tend to compare my skills in a new area to something I already know and do well, and when I can't do the new thing well, I find myself wondering why not. Patience seems to be an attribute that some folks have in abundance. I would not say I'm one of those ;) It helps to watch others going through the same motions though. Checking in here to watch the progress of others helps to encourage me to be patient and keep trying.

    Thanks for sharing the book Scooby, I'll check out that first chapter. And @JimRhodo, keep up the challenges - I haven't tried them myself yet, but they are in my mind and will likely be something I'll try as soon as I finish my catchboxes (yes, more than one), which will hopefully be this weekend :)
     
  4. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    I've seen the video of Bill Hayes hitting a soda can from 400'. I think that may be more than I can hope to accomplish since I just won't be putting that kind of time into practicing, but it does show what can be done with a simple slingshot, and that is very encouraging.
     
  5. BeMahoney

    BeMahoney Builder of things

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    Hey Scoobs,

    thanks for the advice!
    ( now I´m gonna have another slice of
    good german bread with marmite :)
    thread pending..)

    greetings to the kingdom! (of yeast paste)

    Be
     
  6. Arturo Borquez

    Arturo Borquez Administrator

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    my experience would very long to explain as I passed through many different ways and experiments. a resume:
    1) Practice will always improve your performance (perseverance)
    2) When you feel stagnated, time to do experiments and variations, you may find surprising discoveries achieving in one month what you couldn't last 6 month !
    3) every shooter is unique and different, don't fight yourself, let your body choose your form (pull force, draw, stance), learn what intuition teach and finesse will come to you !
    4) release, release, release mantra
    cheers
     
  7. Arturo Borquez

    Arturo Borquez Administrator

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    and forgot 5) it is very unlikely I will ever reach Hayes or torsten skills ... so don't worry be happy lol !
    cheers
     
  8. VWscooby

    VWscooby Senior Member

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    Im glad people like the post and I hope it gives those of us who get frustrated sometimes to take a deep breath and keep on practising! :)
     
  9. Very cool. Everyone always forgets you have to practice! I have shot bows for over 20 years now and I was told I am a "natural" by some people that are new to archery but the fact is I have been shooting for 2 decades! It took a lot of practice to get good. Same with anything really. Thanks for sharing! :)
     
  10. Arturo Borquez

    Arturo Borquez Administrator

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    thanks for sharing VWscooby, it's always good to watch the elusive horizon ...
    cheers