Idea for Jörg

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by starshot, Oct 28, 2011.

  1. starshot

    starshot New Member

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    Homework on behalf of the German Jörg<br>Sprave and his slingshot video activities:<br><br><br><br><br>Dear Jörg,<br><br><br>Your videos are, of<br>course, really cool. I question myself: why do I watch this? Isn't<br>watching projectiles emitted by a rubber sling the stuff that babies<br>like to watch? Yes or no, I still find myself returning to view your<br>videos. Of course, your development and implementation of the<br>phenomenon of emitting projectiles via rubber sling is far from the<br>stuff of babies and is actually quite impressive, if not<br>intimidating!<br><br><br>I find myself spontaneously thinking of<br>possible avenues of expansion for your project. Here are some ideas. I hope they are of use to you.<br><br><br>You appear to be adept at the<br>videography necessary to capture fine details of the impact of the<br>projectiles you use at a low frame rate.<br><br><br>You also appear to be a professional<br>(in life outside of making slingshots and videos) and have a<br>reasonable flow of capital to fund your slingshot and video making<br>activities.<br><br><br>Though this idea may be oriented<br>towards a bit more of the chemistry side of the equation, it may<br>yield visually pleasing or interesting results for your youtube<br>viewers.<br><br><br><br><br>The idea:<br><br><br>Set up a very hard, high carbon steel<br>wall/flat target (with significant thickness). Mounted alone (if<br>large enough) set in concrete or against another wall of concrete or<br>something else that will be immobile despite high energy projectile<br>impact.<br><br><br>Use bullets of different metallic<br>composition (the range of soft, malleable metals, including silver,<br>gold, lead, platinum, mercury amalgam?? (use caution with hazardous<br>materials!), tin/pewter, aluminum, there are a range of choices...<br>copper?)<br><br><br>Your very high energy slingshots (those with<br>highly reliable targeting, so that you may use a high closeup camera<br>shot) seem as though they may be strong enough to make very soft,<br>malleable metal bullets change shape on impact with a very hard<br>target surface. It would be interesting to see the variation in<br>deformity observable in the shape of the bullets as you changed their<br>composition from gold, silver, platinum, iron, nickel, lead and if<br>you dare solid mercury amalgam, which really may be soft and ductile enough to change shape after projection from your most<br>powerful sling(s).<br><br><br>The mercury amalgam I know very little<br>about and you would have to gauge the real safety concerns that may<br>exist with its use, but comparing different varieties (% composition<br>actual mercury) may prove <strong>very interesting visually</strong>... I just<br>imagined seeing a near liquid appearance to a mercury amalgam bullet<br>deformation on impact with a hard target... but, if it is too<br>soft/ductile, it may actually explode and scatter dangerous material,<br>potentially far from the target area... you could construct an<br>environment that would be able to contain any such explosion,<br>though).<br><br><br>Alternatively, you could use a very<br>brittle metallic substance, such as bismuth, and observe the<br>explosion of the projectile itself against a very hard, flat surface<br>(such as high carbon steel). You could compare visually the<br>explosions of various brittle materials.<br><br><br>This may not be where you want to go<br>with the project as it does place the interest into the projectiles<br>themselves, rather than the sling, but the bullet is an important<br>part of the equation.<br><br><br>What is better? You could develop<br>a bullet that will explode on impact with the ballistic gelatin you<br>are working with (at the energies provided by your powerful slings)<br>but the fragments will continue on their path initiated by the sling (further into the ballistic gelatin). Maybe a brittle<br>compound (such as the bismuth mentioned) would be involved? There<br>would be hard pellets, such as steel, held together with a brittle<br>metal such as bismuth... this should work if the gelatin presents enough resistance at its surface to break the brittle metal, allowing the hard pellets to disperse as they penetrate the gelatin.<br><br><br><br>Haha, I hope the thoughts were not<br>unwelcome...<br><br>Cheers and well wishes,<br><br>Shawn<br><br><br>PS-I thought you were going to launch<br>that 5L canister of beer from a catapult rather than shoot at it with<br>steel bullets.... could shooting the canister of beer from a sling be<br>interesting visually? High energy projection against a hard target<br>might be fun :)
     
  2. Ryan Wigglesworth

    Ryan Wigglesworth Senior Member

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    Yes I would like to see Joerg get his hands on some DU... <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1">
     

  3. zamarion

    zamarion New Member

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    would be very very interesting <br>and also, im already working on a version of an explode on impact bullet but it doesnt seem to explode on impact yet <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_razz.gif" alt="Razz" longdesc="9">
     
  4. Wargasm

    Wargasm New Member

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    Sort of like those slo mo shots of bullets hitting heavy steel targets then. Depleted Uranium can be found in scrap yards, it is sometimes used as counterweights in elevators, probably expensive though and be careful asking around as someone inquiring about any sort of uranium usually draws the attention of autorities. DU is inert though and mostly harmless. Mercury is a tricky metal to alloy, I've heard of mercury filled bullets, mercury has a high mass and when the metall jacket is peeled away the liquid transfers a lot of energy in to the target as well as dispersing, thus leaving a large wound tract. Making them would be difficult as you'd need to make a hollow shell with a material soft enough to open up on impact. Maybe somesort of thin glass shell, or a highly frangible material like compressed metal powders or ceramics. Again though the speeds and energy imparted with a slingshot, although pretty high, isn't as high as that of a firearm.