Hunting ?

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by Spatzenterrorist, May 31, 2012.

  1. Spatzenterrorist

    Spatzenterrorist New Member

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    Does anybody of you hunt with slingshots?<br>A friend of my father is havind a lot of rats in his garden and hunts them with a slingshot !!!<br>Do you think that hunting rats with a slingshot is possilbe?<br>I always thought that a slingshot hasn´t gor engouh power to kill any animals!!
     
  2. cbsmith111

    cbsmith111 New Member

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    A strong slingshot with heavy ammo has more than enough power to kill a rat. People regularly hunt things as large as rabbits with them. I have even heard of slightly larger game. I'm itching to try it myself if I can get my skills up to par by this fall. I'm a fairly new shooter, and I'm just not quite 100% confident about making humane kills yet.
     

  3. Earth 2

    Earth 2 New Member

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    A powerful slingshot held by powerful arms can be good for hunting, but a bow is a better option.
     
  4. DaveSteve

    DaveSteve New Member

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    Sure you can kill small animals. Squirrel, rabbits, dove, pigeon, rats, crow, etc.<br><br>But for the most part you need to verify this with your hunting law. <br><br>I believe you can shoot rats without problem but the other I mentioned I'm pretty sure you will have problems with the hunting law in Bavaria.<br><br>Please check it out to stay out of trouble.
     
  5. Spatzenterrorist

    Spatzenterrorist New Member

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    Yes I asked a porfessional hunter nad he said that it is illigeal to hunt with slingshot at all.But in Germany we say : "Wo kein Kläger da kein Richter" that means that if you do something iilegeal and nobody sees it you dont will get put under arrest ,so thanks for your answers....
     
  6. Bill Hays

    Bill Hays New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Spatzenterrorist wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">Does anybody of you hunt with slingshots?<br>A friend of my father is havind a lot of rats in his garden and hunts them with a slingshot !!!<br>Do you think that hunting rats with a slingshot is possilbe?<br>I always thought that a slingshot hasn´t gor engouh power to kill any animals!!</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br><br>This can be a sticky subject for many... but yes a slingshot is more than capable of killing small game or vermin.<br><br>Here's a couple of videos showing just that. In the first one I had to sit and wait a while before the rat showed up... in the second the rabbit was taken using a simple stalking technique.. the rabbit was spotted in the grass, so I set up the camera, a small white fluttering cloth was placed under the camera on the tripod... then slowly I backed away and walked a wide loop around to the backside... once the rabbit was within comfortable range for best accuracy, he was shot.<br><br>Do not look at these videos if blood bothers you... as both of these bled out some after being shot.<br><br><embed pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/OMzBmYWOUR4" width="425" height="350" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" quality="high" scale="exactfit"></embed><br><br><embed pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/mPkJTmLkllg" width="425" height="350" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" quality="high" scale="exactfit"></embed></span>
     
  7. Spatzenterrorist

    Spatzenterrorist New Member

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    You are a really good hunter man!!!!!<br>Do you have any tips for me about hunting,like waht ammunition i should use?
     
  8. Antraxx

    Antraxx #7

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    i´m impressed how "clean" the kills are.<br><br>They are fast and i don´t think the animals do suffer...honestly i don´t see any difference to a rifleshot.<br><br>BUT<br><br>please...i hunted myself (rifle) and i have nothing against it in general...i also know this might be a difficult thing to talk about...please do targetshooting FIRST before you think about hunting! If you are as good as Bill or Gamekeeper john, i´m fine with SS-Hunting...but i´m against lousy shooters just hurting animals, shooting them in the ass or break a leg, so they have to suffer hours before they die in some random hole. Think about that first please...
     
  9. sg76

    sg76 New Member

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    If you are going to hunt make sure you are a good shot <br>For birds use more than one ball the more<br>The better you get the shotgun affect <br>Take it out and dispatch right away when it hits<br>The ground .
     
  10. pelleteer

    pelleteer Middle Aged Delinquent

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    I'll add a definite yes! As has been shown, slingshots are perfectly capable of taking small game. In fact here in Arizona it's specified in the hunting regulations that it's legal to hunt several types of animals with slingshots: cottontail rabbit, crow, house sparrow, jackrabbit, rodents (exluding beavers, muskrats, tree squirrels, and porcupines), squirrels (of the ground variety), European starlings, and coati (a small raccon-like animal). I don't know why some of these animals are legal while others are not, but laws seldom make sense anyway. Lol. At least this shows you some animals that can be taken with slingshots. <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_cool.gif" alt="Cool" longdesc="6">
     
  11. sg76

    sg76 New Member

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    Hear in Scotland we call them pests like sparrows gray squirrel rabbits<br>And so forth I've been lucky were I stay <br>I have had a free run all my life and had some<br>Good food from it but check your laws and enjoy
     
  12. mrjoel

    mrjoel New Member

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    The people that need to hear that stuff are usually the same ones who don't listen in the first place. We all know this, and saying it a 1000 times isn't going to change an idiot's behavior. Perhaps not PC (as well as most of my sentiments), but I feel this gets a little beaten to death. <br><br>Surely, you must be able to hit your target consistently in order to hunt. No one can be expected to hit 100% of the time but it would be a good goal to try to maintain. Coming from a culture of firearms, this seems rather obvious to me.<br><br>It is not unlike boxing, just a different range and use of body mechanics (and elastic) : learn to hit, then to hit hard.
     
  13. Bill Hays

    Bill Hays New Member

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    Well, I'll tell you what... there's a few things you need to know before you go out and hunt.<br><br>1) Know whether it's legal to hunt with a slingshot in your area in the first place.<br><br>2) Make sure you have a powerful enough setup to get the job done. Ammo needs to be big and heavy enough and the bands have to propel it fast enough. As a general guideline I recommend a minimum strength of being able to completely penetrate two unopened soda pop cans one set in front of the other, shot from 10 meters.... that will take care of most animals rabbit sized on down. 9.5 mm lead is the minimum I'd use for squirrel and rabbit. 8mm lead is my usual minimum for birds.<br><br>3) Accuracy... make sure you are accurate enough with your hunting setup. Personally I won't let any of the kids I teach how to shoot go hunting in our woods unless they can hit a wiffle golf ball 50% of the time or better from 10 meters.... using the same setup they will be hunting with<br><br>4) Beware of your backstop... when shooting always know where the ammo will go if you miss. Never take a chance on sending a ball towards anything you don't want shot.<br><br>5) Know your game and how to hunt it... sounds obvious, but there's more to it than just tromping around until you run across something to shoot. Humans didn't become the apex predator on the planet through luck. When out hunting most stuff... Stop, look and listen... walk quietly for a few feet, stop and look, listen for movement.... then repeat. For specific animals you look for specific things... know the food source, water source and possible shelter area for the quarry... tracking is more about logic, common sense and being observant. Know what your prey needs, and it's habits then it becomes fairly easy to figure out your best opportunities for taking that game.
     
  14. gtmcfar

    gtmcfar New Member

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    What a coincidence. I am waiting for Sun-down right now so I can go nail a few rats that will probably be in my trees.<br><br>I don't believe in political correctness. A wounded rat that will crawl off and die in pain is better than leaving the rat to run off and breed 400,000 more rats before it dies so they can go off and kill humans by spreading disease and eating crops. If everyone 2000 years ago had a bleeding heart for rats like all the ignorant losers who complain about rat-shooting videos on Youtube, there would probably be no human civilization today.<br><br>Now I have to say, I don't hunt rats with a slingshot. I just can't get the repeatability necessary for accuracy. I hope to someday and have been trying stuff from Mr. Hays and other's videos on Youtube. Until then I will stick with airguns so I almost always have one-shot kills.<br><br>If I don't get a one-shot kill I don't lose any sleep over it. Nasty disease ridden critters. Yuck.
     
  15. Spatzenterrorist

    Spatzenterrorist New Member

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    Thanks Bil, for your great answers!!<br>I think i will have to do some more praktice , before i start to hunt.<br>Tomorrow i will go to an supermarket and by some sods cans ,just for testing how strong my slingshot is !!!!And I have to geat some led balls to!,but there can i get them?
     
  16. mrjoel

    mrjoel New Member

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    <br>Humans are omnivores, not predators. We are the dominant species, but certainly not the apex predator. This is why we lazily turned to horticulture, which is the source of your rat problem.
     
  17. Bill Hays

    Bill Hays New Member

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    Joel, that is a matter of contention... because of our greater intelligence we're capable of much more than most of us will ever accomplish. Just because we choose to be omnivores and most of us humans rarely hunt... that does not take away from our capabilities. Our diet has little to do with what we are. Make no mistake about it, we are predators. Think about it, a Kodiak bear is also a omnivore... but very few people would argue that it's not a predator.<br><br>When I was in my 20s I spent a considerable amount of time in Central America... much of it not "in town". Let me just tell you, when you see the hunter gatherer peoples of the jungle do their thing... You quickly realize how soft we've become and what we're really capable of. We're apex predators not because we are swift of foot or have lethal claws and teeth... we can out think all other species, craft the tools to kill them and then devise a method in which to accomplish that.
     
  18. mrjoel

    mrjoel New Member

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    I wasn't arguing we are not capable of predation, only that that isn't our sole function. That is why we are classified as omnivores. Even jungle tribes often raise some crops or have chickens. I would argue a Kodiak bear is not a predator, just a very, very large opportunist with predatory capabilities-not unlike ourselves minus an opposable thumb. It's size,claws, and teeth are more indicative of a predator though-certainly more so than us.<br><br>A predator by definition obtains sustenance through killing other animals primarily. While in the case of the bear (unless we count the Panda), lie more on the meat side of things which is certainly true. However a bear eats whatever it finds which inevitably would include plants and fungi. Conversely, a fox which is universally considered a predator consumes up to 30% of it's diet on vegetable matter during warmer months. <br><br>In terms of humans it is our ability to adapt and plan ahead that enables our survival, not our hunting skills. Surely these skills have played a role, but if they are superior how is it then that horticultural societies have come to dominate (and invariably intolerate) hunter gatherer societies with greater success? One would think the reality is we are more successful at farming and raising animals, negating the theory that we are "apex" hunters.<br><br>If we were that good we would have stuck to it instead of "evolving" into becoming "civilized." Our abilities in terms of hunting and gathering may be impressive, but not a skill set that can trump technology and nation states. Those that try to maintain such a lifestyle are either exterminated or relegated to the depths of the jungle. No matter how hard your aboriginal warrior may be, he isn't going to beat a contractor with a politician backing him. <br><br>It just seems silly thinking we are master hunters when we have so many things detracting from that as a reality. Perhaps I am overdue for a trip in the jungle?
     
  19. Bill Hays

    Bill Hays New Member

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    I'm not entirely sure I understand your point Joel.... <br><br>It's my opinion that diet doesn't define whether one is an apex predator or not... not in a real sense of the word. Now the dictionary definition (if I remember correctly from elementary school) may be only applicable to Lions or something who's diet is primarily meat... but we humans basically allow Lions to exist because we want them to..... we can and do turn predators into prey all the time.... a premeditated killer of predators would certainly have to be considered more dangerous than a mere predator... therefore we are apex predators. Predator of predators. <br><br>It may not be "fair" how we do it... for example, we can't outrun even the slowest of most rabbits, and an adolescent baboon could literally tear the strongest of us asunder.... but because we are smart, we create tools and techniques that allow us to kill pretty much anything we want.... and in fact have to reduce our odds of success by using things like slingshots in the hunt to provide a worthy challenge.... yes we are indeed at the Apex of current Predators.
     
  20. mrjoel

    mrjoel New Member

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    Oxford definition: <br><br>predator<br><br>Syllabification:OnOff<br>Pronunciation: /ˈpredətər/<br>noun<br>1an animal that naturally preys on others:<br>wolves are major predators of rodents<br>2a person or group that ruthlessly exploits others:<br>a website frequented by sexual predators<br>a company that tries to take over another.<br><br>Webster's definition:<br><br>predator<br><br>Syllabification:OnOff<br>Pronunciation: /ˈpredətər/<br>noun<br>1an animal that naturally preys on others:<br>wolves are major predators of rodents<br>2a person or group that ruthlessly exploits others:<br>a website frequented by sexual predators<br>a company that tries to take over another.<br><br>Dictionary.com definition:<br><br>pred·a·tor&ensp; &ensp;[pred-uh-ter, -tawr] Show IPA<br>noun<br>1.<br>Zoology . any organism that exists by preying upon other organisms.<br>2.<br>a predatory person.<br>Origin: <br>1920&ndash;25; < Latin praedātor plunderer, equivalent to praedā ( rī ) to plunder (derivative of praeda prey) + -tor -tor<br><br>I guess I was thinking in scientific terms. Slingshots are used to obtain sustenance only in places where guns are not available. We that do it in "civilized" countries do it usually where guns are prohibited, not because we are "that good." I sincerely doubt most hunters honestly looking for genuine sustenance do it for a challenge, although there are surely exceptions to this. <br><br>Yes, we are apex predators by definition(2): we can blow up the entire world at the push of a button. But how successful is that in terms of propagating a species? <br><br>I guess the point is we shouldn't toot our horns too much as hunters when any people who live by such means we gladly hunt down to assimilate or eradicate ourselves in the name of such things as nationalism, fruit farms, and piousness. Pick your brand, the results are the same. Notice the distinct lack of hunter-gatherer societies in the world at large today. It is the inevitable byproduct of monotheist horticultural nations worldwide. In a roundabout way I am agreeing with you: Predator of predators indeed!