Guide to carving Naturals by Saderath

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by Saderath, Nov 12, 2013.

  1. Saderath

    Saderath Senior Member

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    Hey guys!

    A few people have been asking how do I make my naturals, so here is a quick guide, a few tips and a way of thinking.

    Tools: hand saw, rasp, file, knife, vice, sandpaper, wire cutter and most important imagination.

    I would like to start by saying that obviously all naturals have a unique shape.
    Therefore, recognizing prior to carving if a fork is more suitable for the left or right hand and also the dimensions that it should be cut to, comes down to personal preference and mostly experience.

    The only limit is the imagination.
    If you think that a painter looks at a blank canvas and visualizes his creation,
    the same thing should happen when looking at a fork.

    And as I like to say take your time and enjoy it!

    Today's session No#1

    The picture below is a natural olive fork with an Iroko and Red Meranti endcap. I usually cut the fork tips a bit higher as it makes it easier to work with on the vise (this also depends on the fork) and I have a better understanding finding the sweet-spot later on to what height they should be cut.

    What I see here is a left hand, thin handle, low fork with a hint of ergo.

    [​IMG]

    Tip: When rasping it is helpful to place something under the workpiece immobilizing it, giving you more control.

    [​IMG]

    Start by carving the handle in alignment with the forks.
    The shape is entirely up to you but make sure you do not take off too much material at a time, keep checking against a light bulb spotting out where it is uneven. Good lighting is important.

    [​IMG]

    Tip: An easy way to get rid of the friz created when working on the endcap is with a wire cutter.

    [​IMG]

    Below the handle has been shaped as desired, giving it a comfortable ergonomic feel. Usually the more rounded it is, the better it feels in the hand.

    [​IMG]

    This used be as one

    [​IMG]

    The fork tip shaping/cutting and more details will be presented in a second session I will post in a couple of days.

    In the meantime, I hope this part helps you all with your creations.

    Thanks
    Saderath
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2013
  2. Tremoside

    Tremoside SINdustrial designer

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    Thanks for sharing! :) Do you have plans to explain something about slingshot anatomy? Some preferred sizes, generic shapes or now you're focusing on building strictly?

    Thank you again, great idea from you!
     

  3. Mister Magpie

    Mister Magpie New Member

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    Saderath,

    Thanks for the tutorial. Great job so far!

    Darren
     
  4. Saderath

    Saderath Senior Member

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    I am mainly focusing on building but I may refer to some of these questions along the way.

    The thing is that shape and size has a lot of variables such as

    The material: In this case, Olive wood is hard as a rock and going thin for comfort is no issue. However, for example pine doesn't come close to such strength.

    Shooting style: side shooting, 30 degree, hammer grip
    All styles can be enhanced by adding features that are more suitable for each.

    Personal preference: low or high fork, Pocketable, fork gap dimension, ergo or straight handle, finger grooves or no, straight or rounded fork tips, angled forks.

    Thanks
    Saderath
     
  5. Bushmaster

    Bushmaster New Member

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    I'm lovin' this. Baby oh baby, you're the best... Don't stop!
     
  6. flicks

    flicks ...lost in the woods....

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    Fantastic Saderath, very interesting tutorial. I am looking forward to your next ones!
     
  7. VWscooby

    VWscooby Senior Member

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    Excellent idea. Looking forward to the second instalment already!
     
  8. JohnKrakatoa

    JohnKrakatoa Loudest boom on Earth

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    thanks for the good guide. I hope someday ill get to use power tools because the hand suff is tiresome lol. :)
     
  9. Lacumo

    Lacumo Member

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    FANTASTIC tutorial!! Very well done. Thank you very much!
     
  10. LW

    LW New Member

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    Thank you very much Saderath, even if I have done some woodwork and some naturals. It is always very helpful to see how others do!

    If you allow me a note? I would add another tool to you list… (Tools: hand saw, rasp, file, knife, vice, sandpaper, wire cutter and most important imagination.)


    a good red wine Wein.jpg or a bier Bier.jpg and some use some jack jack.jpg



    :D :D :D :D :D



    Don’t take this too seriously, I am looking forward to your next steps!
     
  11. Saderath

    Saderath Senior Member

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    Haha! I drink beer in the summer ( I have a beer bottle collection) and wine or Rakomelo in the winter
     
  12. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    Great thread Saderath. I love getting a chance to see how folks make their creations. You've also given me a few ideas I hadn't previously considered, which will be employed in my building techniques. I'm looking forward to the next post on this topic.

    One question on your endcaps. What do you use as an adhesive? Epoxy? Wood glue?
     
  13. Saderath

    Saderath Senior Member

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    I use good quality super glue but it is critical to get the amount right.
    It is unexpected but too much is worse than a little less.
    It goes without saying that you must make sure it is applied to the hole area.
    You will know the correct amount when it is just coming out of the side when pressed together. Hold until you get bored and let it cure for 24 hours.

    I have done a many tests and the only way I have managed to get the endcap off is by literally hammering it off in pieces.
    I wouldn't change it for anything else, all my creations stand as proof.

    Thanks
    Saderath
     
  14. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    That does surprise me. I'm no adhesives expert, but everything I've ever read about CA adhesives is that they have great tensile strength, but very low shear strength. But, your own experience seems to counter that. I wonder if perhaps that is due to the pores in the wood allowing a deeper bonding penetration. If it takes hammer blows to break that bond, it sure sounds like you've got shear strength to me.

    I wonder - do you ever bond other materials, such as metal? I wonder if you would get equally good results bonding wood to metal with superglue, I suspect the results may not be as good? Probably better to use epoxy in that situation.

    Thanks for the info. I'm going to add that to my list of approved materials for slingshot building.
     
  15. Flipgun

    Flipgun Well-Known Member

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    Good of you to pass on your experience. I look forward to the next one.
     
  16. Mister Magpie

    Mister Magpie New Member

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    I don't understand, where is part two? I mean, I am a pretty patient person, but it has been a WHOLE DAY since you posted this thread. I want to see part two NOW! :D

    Darren
     
  17. Saderath

    Saderath Senior Member

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    Haha patience my friend! This weekend I will work on the second part!
    Not enough hours in the day lately!

    Thanks
    Saderath
     
  18. Can-Opener

    Can-Opener New Member

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    Nice to see your methods. Looking forward to part 2.
     
  19. Saderath

    Saderath Senior Member

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    My beer bottle collection! The bottles at the back are Greek beers and the others are international!
    I just wish they would all refill! :p

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Saderath

    Saderath Senior Member

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    Part 2

    Next step is marking out where to cut the forks, the best tool for this is a back saw.

    [​IMG]

    I like to keep the forks as thick and even as possible for obvious reasons,
    this is the part that I spend the most time on carving a bit and checking, over and over again. Get one of the forks to the desired shape and then continue replicating it to the other. Make sure you create clean transitions from fork to fork and forks to handle.

    Spending a lot of time filing and refining the curves is beneficial.
    Saves you a great amount of time from sanding out those deep marks and I don't think there is a person here that enjoys sanding more than filing!!!

    [​IMG]

    Fork tips before and after...

    [​IMG]

    Tip: Use a cloth in the vice when in the final stages so you do not hurt your carving.

    [​IMG]

    For more information on rounding the fork tips please see following thread...

    https://www.theslingshotforum.com/f6/when-accuracy-matters-31200/

    At the end of the day there is nothing more rewarding than knowing that you have taken something that was offered by mother nature, in return, giving it a second life and bringing the best out of it. Goes without saying, satisfying your need to create functional art and the bragging rights of a 100% hand made slingshot.

    I hope you all enjoyed the tutorial and hope to see many of your creations!

    Anyone interested in owning a Saderath Slingshot,
    Please visit my online store for more information.

    https://www.etsy.com/shop/SaderathSlingshots

    Thanks
    Saderath