Grip types.

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by Warrior2014, Jan 28, 2014.

  1. Warrior2014

    Warrior2014 New Member

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    Hi everyone, Its me again, the newbie :p.

    I was looking at the simple shot range, and noticed there are various ways you can grip the slingshot, such as fork support, hammer, and Pinch grip.
    Are there any advantages/disadvantages to each style, or is it personal choice?

    Again, sorry if this is a common question, Thanks, Conan.
     
  2. Tremoside

    Tremoside SINdustrial designer

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    Hi there :)

    There are no common questions always feel free to ask :)

    So as you mentioned there are several grips for different shooting methods. I don't say styles coz the difference is in the goal not in the way you want to shoot.

    A hammergrip is a solid and secure gripstyle if you're going for heavy bands and larger ammo. For eg.: over 12mm and double bands. It's not a proper rule just a simplified example. Some people prefer hammergrip to shooting butterfly style also. In butterfly your pouch hand is also pulled back at full. Think of Icaros's flight.

    Pinch grip is great for vertical (or also called gangsta) shooting style that's really fine for target shooting. 3/8" nor 10mm steel balls and a single layer band or tubes. It reduces movement during aiming (or just helps to precisely aim) coz it shortens the force lever. Some guys use a lanyard additionally to drive away stress from the fingers and support the hold by a wrist strap (the lanyard). With this way the release moment is smoother since you dont have to grab it so hard and let the forces do their job on release.

    Thumb support, finger support are close to the pinch grip. It's a combination of taste, your hands anatomy and the frame's shaping. But in very general it's around the pinch grip.

    If you're talking about the Scout (Scout's info page) here ("I was looking at the simple shot range") you can test a large variety of versions with that slingshot and you're also able to modify the frame with simple tools to fit in your hand perfectly.

    If you need more information in general I suggest you to look at You2B and check Simple Shot Shooting Sports (Nathan Masters) Pocket Predator (Bill Hays) and earlier videos of the master of the house (Joerg) Jörg Sprave.

    Hope it helps,
    Greetings,
    Tremo
     

  3. Warrior2014

    Warrior2014 New Member

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    Thank you for a great answer! I also have another question, I found a old slingshot in my garage, and was having some fun earlier, but noticed I may be using wrong. I am right handed, but hold with my right hand and pull with my left, is this a habit I should get out of? As I read it is the incorrect way, but it feels comfortable to me.

    And Joerg was the persons videos I was watching yesterday that made me and Cheyenne want to get into this! Didn't realise he was the owner, small world!

    Thanks, Conan and Cheyenne.
     
  4. AngelicScars

    AngelicScars MILF of the board

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    You hold it the way that is most comfortable with you. I'm left-handed and hold my slingshot with my left hand and pull with my right. With a bow, I do the opposite. It's strange, but it's what is most comfortable. When I get a chance to shoot again, I think I'm going to try to shoot as if I'm holding a bow to see if it does get more comfortable.
     
  5. Tremoside

    Tremoside SINdustrial designer

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    Preferred hand is totally up to you! It worth to practice with both for few hundred shots but start with a comfortable setup.

    What Angelic wrote is true for me too. Am right handed, holding a bow in my right hand but exactly the opposite for slingshots. So it happens with us :)

    Before I forget.. when you starting to shoot it's a good practice if you don't draw to your eyes. It worth to get used to it. Start your pull back below your head and rise when you almost at your anchor point (corner of mouth or chin, etc). Some guys make the draw as usual instead, but hold their head up and after the total draw reached they bow a bit and touching the bans/tubes with their cheek. Actually they're look into the "aim chamber". This technique also gives you a nice rhythm for shooting. Load, grip, pull, rise, look into, aim, release. If your rubber will wear out it will slap back. It's just good to try to make a good habit of safety.

    My recommendation about this hole slingshot thing is to read this book or try to take a look inside: http://www.simple-shot.com/products/slingshot-shooting-by-jack-kohler
    There are better books about the physics of rubber and projectile related knowledge but this book is truly enjoyable for a beginner.

    Tremo
     
  6. Warrior2014

    Warrior2014 New Member

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    Thank you all for your replies, and I will stick to the hand that is comfortable then :).

    OK, I have always drawn to my eyes, well I say always, I mean up till the age of 12, and since finding an old one yesterday lol. Where is it best to draw to?
    I have been doing some research, and understand it depends on the type of slingshot you have, such as the butterfly pull, but I always gathered you pulled to eye level?
    I will check the link you provided for me, as I need to learn, and so does my Fiance, who we are both sharing an account.

    How should we aim/fire without using eye level? It will feel strange trying to aim without my eyes as a guide.

    Thanks again, Conan and Cheyenne.
     
  7. Tremoside

    Tremoside SINdustrial designer

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    These videos will help to visually depict the movement.

    [ame]http://youtu.be/0CVFtPbW5IY[/ame]

    [ame]http://youtu.be/EjB3uRNJp7Q[/ame]

    Once you learn to shoot consistently --> hold the frame firmly and use an anchor point repeatedly (it's a kind of sweet-spot for the releasing hand) you only have to search an aiming point at your frame. Or just simply rely on instincts. I'm sure it will be cleaned up by the videos.

    At the end of this video you can also check shooting flow from different angles. [ame]http://youtu.be/bD1ZafzJTbA[/ame]

    Bests, :)
    T
     
  8. Jeremy

    Jeremy Senior member who totally rocks a pink Scout! Pink

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    Shooting style all depends on personal preference and the type of slingshot/band/ammo combination. I personally shoot with the thumb support style with my Scout and Maxim. When I shoot my Trumark wrist rockets, I shoot hammer grip.

    Which hand you hold the slingshot in also is a mixture of personal preference and eye dominance. I'm right handed and right eye dominant so I hold my slingshots and bow in my left hand and draw back with my right. I shoot my pistols with my right hand.

    It all boils down to what you find most comfortable and gives you the consistency and accuracy you are looking for.
     
  9. smallbore

    smallbore New Member

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    I am guessing from reading between the lines that its difficult to easily have both power and accuracy in one grip?