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Junior Member
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64 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Sorry to post another newb question but here goes:

What frame would you recommend to a beginner interested in improving his accuracy? I would like to shoot flat bands OTT for now.

One frame that i spotted recently was the "BloodShot Hunter":

http://www.catapults.co/hunter_twin.html

This struck me as a good option as it is around the size I want (140mm x 90mm) with a reasonable fork gap (45mm) and flat parallel tips. It is also affordable and available easily in the UK, where I am based.

Does anyone have this frame? Would you recommend it for beginners?

I would appreciate any advice anyone can give me!

Oh, btw some of you may have seen another thread I started about the PFS for beginners. I am also interested in the PFS, but would still like to practice with a more "traditional" style of frame.
 

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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the tip! Have you used this frame? If so, what did you think to it?
 

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4,792 Posts
Hi Billy-Bob,

I'm a newbie slingshot shooter too and the Bloodshot Hunter was my first catapult. My second was a Rambone. The Rambone is definitely good, but personally, I just love my Bloodshot. I find it really comfortable to hold and shoot. It's light, strong, cheap (got mine off Ebay), even has a nice "sound". I got black, so it's wicked cool to look at too.

This doesn't mean it's necessarily the best one for new shooters like us, or the best one for you (I don't have that much to compare it with, so more experienced folks can probably advise you better) but I am definitely really happy with it.

Have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey Jeb,

Glad you have had a good experience of the frame as your first slingshot. I think for the price, there is no reason not to get one and give it a try!

I also considered a Rambone but tbh I dont really like the fact that it only seems to allow the hammer grip. i would like to be able to experiment with the fork supported grip.
 

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You can go nuts trying to pick out that first one. Check out --- http://www.simple-shot.com --- http://www.pocketpredator.com --- http://www.milbroproshotuk.com --- http://www.slingshotchannelstore.de/english/

I started with a Pocket Predator HTS, then I got a SimpleShot Scout and a couple others and then a Rambone and then a couple more... Right now I think I have around 10 and I’m moving into making my own. I think a lot of us end up going through a fair number of frame styles before finally settling on the one that works best for us. When I finally figure out what that one is for me, I’ll probably have to do an inventory reduction sale (or else have a box of perfectly good slingshots that I never use any more hidden away in a closet).

If you want to experiment with different grip styles, the SimpleShot Scout is good because you can grip it in three different ways.

That Bloodshot Hunter looks OK and it’s reasonably priced, so it’s probably a good starter. Good luck picking that first one!
 

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It all depends on what you grew up using. I have created and tried all sorts of slingshots but I still love and frequently prefer good natural forks.

The Bloodshot, Predator, and Scout are all excellent starters because they let you hold/brace them in several different holding methods while you shoot allowing you to determine which hold works best for you. After that you can try models that lean toward the specific hold you prefer.
 

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Any frame will do as long as you pay attention to your technique.

Start with a low budget one because you will get fork hits.

By the way, can anyone give me some measurements of your bloodshot hunter? I want to try make one for myself.
 

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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the thoughts guys. I think, as you have said, I need a frame that will let me try out several different styles of grip. The howitzer i have, like the rambone, seems optomised for hammer grip which doesnt allow for much experimentation!

@Cez:The link above claims the bloodshot is 140mm x 90mm with a fork width of 45mm and fork depth of 47mm. I don't have one atm but I think I am gonna have to pick one up. When I do I will give you some more measurements!
 

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Thanks for the thoughts guys. I think, as you have said, I need a frame that will let me try out several different styles of grip. The howitzer i have, like the rambone, seems optomised for hammer grip which doesnt allow for much experimentation!

@Cez:The link above claims the bloodshot is 140mm x 90mm with a fork width of 45mm and fork depth of 47mm. I don't have one atm but I think I am gonna have to pick one up. When I do I will give you some more measurements!
Most of those dimensions match my BSH, BillyBob. The fork depth, on mine at least, is 40mm though. Thickness of the frame is about 19mm.
 

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I started shooting with a homemade Slingshot made out of a thin plates of aluminium and plywood using Theraband Tubing Yellow. Then the SlingshotChannelStore started selling the Rambone and i bought one. At the same time I made another slingshot from thicker plywood (1st one in the slingshot registry). I then attached the flatbands from the Rambone to this homemade frame and i had better accuracy because i used the fork supported shooting style. Today i have several different Slingshots in aluminium and plywood and shoot all of them with my fingers at the fork. I also use the Rambone (with tubular bands for plinking) like this and became quite an accurate shooter.
 
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