General sandpaper/finishing discussions

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by Ryan Wigglesworth, Apr 26, 2012.

  1. Ryan Wigglesworth

    Ryan Wigglesworth Senior Member

    1,570
    0
    0
    <div>First off, there are some grits that we are all familiar with I think, sorta industry standard numbers for sandpaper they range from very low to fairly high:<br><br>40,80,100,150,220,320,400,600,800,1000,1500,2000 are the ones available to me from the local hardware stores for metal finishing and wood finishing.<br><br>The best kinds I have found have a mesh backing, the cheap paper kinds you get what you pay for , but some like 3M and GatorGrit are quality.<br><br>Some mesh back brand that I just recently came across is MicroMesh Its grits go as follows:<br><br>1500,1800,2400,3200,3600,4000,6000,8000,12000<br><br>To compare these with the normal sandpaper a conversion chart is <a href="http://www.sisweb.com/micromesh/conversion.htm" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.sisweb.com/micromesh/conversion.htm</a><br><br><br>So normally to achieve the best possible finish (blemish free) I go from grit to grit as advised by Joerg, all the way up to as high as you have. Then you wet your hands and wet the frame lightly but evenly, allow this to dry (it raises the grain) and repeat sanding from around 400-2000 again. This is followed by a wipe with a micro fiber cloth and some chrome polish. If you I want a protected frame I use a thick superglue and wipe it one or drizzle it on evenly ( thin works also ) I allow this to dry and then start sanding back from around 220 lightly and 320 and all the way up again, repeat as necessary for desired strength and fork hit resistance <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_razz.gif" alt="Razz" longdesc="9"><br><br>To obtain more info on how to sand like pros googling about for how pen makers do their thing is a good resource.<br>also here : <a href="http://www.woodweb.com/Resources/wood_eng_handbook/Ch15.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.woodweb.com/Resources/wood_eng_handbook/Ch15.pdf</a><br><br><br><br><br>So far I have not experimented with wet sanding wood, and have been all dry sanding, I notice it is difficult to achieve a mirror finish this way and I wonder if anyone has experience with wet sanding having better results?<br><br><br><br><table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>JoergS wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">Well, here are some of my tricks.<br><br>I guess you all know how to rasp, file, and sand a piece of wood. I go up to 1000 or 1200 grid.<br><br>Here is where my tricks start.<br><br><strong>First - use car chrome polish.</strong> The stuff that you can buy in tubes, like Autosol. <br><br>Rub<br> it onto the sanded surface and polish away. You simply won't believe <br>what a difference it makes. It removes the dust from all of the pores <br>and brings out the beauty of the wood. <br><br><strong>Second - don't skip the wetting and resanding.</strong><br><br>When<br> you work on the wooden surface with tools and sand paper, you flatten <br>the wood fibres. So after the last sanding round, when you think <br>everything is perfectly smooth, just briefly put your hand under water <br>and stroke the wood with your wet hand. You will immediately experience <br>that the wood gets furry again! The fibres are standing up. That is what<br> you want. Let the piece dry out completely. <br><br>Then, resand with the finest grit you have.<br><br>You<br> can repeat this a few times to make sure you have done a thorough <br>enough job. The "furry" effect will be less and less prominent. <br><br>Finally,<br> re-polish with the car chrome paste. You now have a piece of wood that <br>will stay in this polished condition even if it gets a bit wet, from <br>humidity or a sweaty palm. And it simply gets more shiny as a total. <br><br><strong>Third - try ink!</strong><br><br>I use ink to bring out the grain. Inking will show grain even in otherwise pale and bland wood. It also comes in many colors.<br><br>Document<br> grade ink is made to stain wooden fibres (paper is made out of wood, <br>too), and to withstand time, humidity and sunlight. It is soaked up by <br>the wood, but not uniformly. The softer parts of the wood soak up more <br>ink, and the direction of the fibres is also important. <br><br>Ink therefore is ideal to bring out the differences in the wooden structure.<br><br>What<br> you need to do is to find out the right concentration of the ink. Pure <br>ink usually is too much, you need to add some water to it. Take a piece <br>of the wood you want to make your weapon from, polish it and apply <br>various solutions, then choose the one you like the most.<br><br>Then <br>apply the ink and let it dry completely. Resand with fine grit sand <br>paper. Then use car chrome polish and a soft rag. This will remove the <br>dust and also unsoaked ink. <br><br>Afterwards, you can apply clear oil <br>(linseed works but it adds a bit of yellow) or coat the whole thing with<br> polyurethane for protection against the elements. <br><br>So, enough for starters! Hope you will find this useful.</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"></span>
    </div><div class="clear"></div><div class="signature_div">
    <br><a href="http://voiceofquran.info/mp3_files/german_quran_mp3/001.mp3" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://voiceofquran.info/mp3_files/german_quran_mp3/001.mp3</a><br>my website! <a href="http://wigglesworthswoodwork.webs.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://wigglesworthswoodwork.webs.com/</a><br>For your spiritual well being ( more important than anything ) <a href="http://muttaqun.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://muttaqun.com/</a>
    </div>
     
  2. zamarion

    zamarion New Member

    370
    0
    0
    i use sandpaper 400 then 240 and i finish with glasspaper 100
     

  3. CaptainBacon

    CaptainBacon Knowledgeable Man

    260
    0
    0
    Wet sanding is more useful for plastics. The water mixes with the dust to create a slurry that helps to smooth the piece, and prevent the sandpaper from clogging. <br><br>I would note that it's important to be very thorough with each grit you use. It takes a lot longer to sand a frame by hand than to sand a pen on a lathe. At the same time stickshots made on the lathe are quick, easy, and look great.
     
  4. Ryan Wigglesworth

    Ryan Wigglesworth Senior Member

    1,570
    0
    0
    <div>Thx bro ! making sure each grit is smooth as it can be is key, and remove lines from the previous grit each time before moving on... it can be painstaking given a non flowing design...</div><div class="clear"></div><div class="signature_div">
    <br><a href="http://voiceofquran.info/mp3_files/german_quran_mp3/001.mp3" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://voiceofquran.info/mp3_files/german_quran_mp3/001.mp3</a><br>my website! <a href="http://wigglesworthswoodwork.webs.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://wigglesworthswoodwork.webs.com/</a><br>For your spiritual well being ( more important than anything ) <a href="http://muttaqun.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://muttaqun.com/</a>
    </div>
     
  5. trobbie66

    trobbie66 New Member

    65
    0
    0
    <div>Wet sanding is normally only done when there is a finish on the wood. Wet sanding usually starts at 600 to 800 grit to make a base for final gloss coat then a buff.</div><div class="clear"></div><div class="signature_div">
    <br>Trobbie66 <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_cheers.png" alt="cheers" longdesc="28">
    </div>
     
  6. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

    5,803
    107
    63
    Well, here are some of my tricks.<br><br>I guess you all know how to rasp, file, and sand a piece of wood. I go up to 1000 or 1200 grid.<br><br>Here is where my tricks start.<br><br><strong>First - use car chrome polish.</strong> The stuff that you can buy in tubes, like Autosol. <br><br>Rub it onto the sanded surface and polish away. You simply won't believe what a difference it makes. It removes the dust from all of the pores and brings out the beauty of the wood. <br><br><strong>Second - don't skip the wetting and resanding.</strong><br><br>When you work on the wooden surface with tools and sand paper, you flatten the wood fibres. So after the last sanding round, when you think everything is perfectly smooth, just briefly put your hand under water and stroke the wood with your wet hand. You will immediately experience that the wood gets furry again! The fibres are standing up. That is what you want. Let the piece dry out completely. <br><br>Then, resand with the finest grit you have.<br><br>You can repeat this a few times to make sure you have done a thorough enough job. The "furry" effect will be less and less prominent. <br><br>Finally, re-polish with the car chrome paste. You now have a piece of wood that will stay in this polished condition even if it gets a bit wet, from humidity or a sweaty palm. And it simply gets more shiny as a total. <br><br><strong>Third - try ink!</strong><br><br>I use ink to bring out the grain. Inking will show grain even in otherwise pale and bland wood. It also comes in many colors.<br><br>Document grade ink is made to stain wooden fibres (paper is made out of wood, too), and to withstand time, humidity and sunlight. It is soaked up by the wood, but not uniformly. The softer parts of the wood soak up more ink, and the direction of the fibres is also important. <br><br>Ink therefore is ideal to bring out the differences in the wooden structure.<br><br>What you need to do is to find out the right concentration of the ink. Pure ink usually is too much, you need to add some water to it. Take a piece of the wood you want to make your weapon from, polish it and apply various solutions, then choose the one you like the most.<br><br>Then apply the ink and let it dry completely. Resand with fine grit sand paper. Then use car chrome polish and a soft rag. This will remove the dust and also unsoaked ink. <br><br>Afterwards, you can apply clear oil (linseed works but it adds a bit of yellow) or coat the whole thing with polyurethane for protection against the elements. <br><br>So, enough for starters! Hope you will find this useful.
     
  7. softgoat

    softgoat New Member

    34
    0
    0
    Sandpaper is often sold as Open face or closed face. The Open face has fewer particles of grit per square cm, making it more flexible and easier to wrap around the piece. Also open face does not clog up so fast. I usually use open face for all small parts I sand. <br><br>A trick I use in between coats of poly urethane is rubbing with extra fine steel wool, instead of fine sand paper. I may not do this when the wood is very light sometimes steel wool will leave a grey tinge on the work.
     
  8. Ryan Wigglesworth

    Ryan Wigglesworth Senior Member

    1,570
    0
    0
    <div>
    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>JoergS wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">Well, here are some of my tricks.<br><br>I guess you all know how to rasp, file, and sand a piece of wood. I go up to 1000 or 1200 grid.<br><br>Here is where my tricks start.<br><br><strong>First - use car chrome polish.</strong> The stuff that you can buy in tubes, like Autosol. <br><br>Rub it onto the sanded surface and polish away. You simply won't believe what a difference it makes. It removes the dust from all of the pores and brings out the beauty of the wood. <br><br><strong>Second - don't skip the wetting and resanding.</strong><br><br>When you work on the wooden surface with tools and sand paper, you flatten the wood fibres. So after the last sanding round, when you think everything is perfectly smooth, just briefly put your hand under water and stroke the wood with your wet hand. You will immediately experience that the wood gets furry again! The fibres are standing up. That is what you want. Let the piece dry out completely. <br><br>Then, resand with the finest grit you have.<br><br>You can repeat this a few times to make sure you have done a thorough enough job. The "furry" effect will be less and less prominent. <br><br>Finally, re-polish with the car chrome paste. You now have a piece of wood that will stay in this polished condition even if it gets a bit wet, from humidity or a sweaty palm. And it simply gets more shiny as a total. <br><br><strong>Third - try ink!</strong><br><br>I use ink to bring out the grain. Inking will show grain even in otherwise pale and bland wood. It also comes in many colors.<br><br>Document grade ink is made to stain wooden fibres (paper is made out of wood, too), and to withstand time, humidity and sunlight. It is soaked up by the wood, but not uniformly. The softer parts of the wood soak up more ink, and the direction of the fibres is also important. <br><br>Ink therefore is ideal to bring out the differences in the wooden structure.<br><br>What you need to do is to find out the right concentration of the ink. Pure ink usually is too much, you need to add some water to it. Take a piece of the wood you want to make your weapon from, polish it and apply various solutions, then choose the one you like the most.<br><br>Then apply the ink and let it dry completely. Resand with fine grit sand paper. Then use car chrome polish and a soft rag. This will remove the dust and also unsoaked ink. <br><br>Afterwards, you can apply clear oil (linseed works but it adds a bit of yellow) or coat the whole thing with polyurethane for protection against the elements. <br><br>So, enough for starters! Hope you will find this useful.</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br><br>Damn authoritative! Thanks for posting!</span>
    </div><div class="clear"></div><div class="signature_div">
    <br><a href="http://voiceofquran.info/mp3_files/german_quran_mp3/001.mp3" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://voiceofquran.info/mp3_files/german_quran_mp3/001.mp3</a><br>my website! <a href="http://wigglesworthswoodwork.webs.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://wigglesworthswoodwork.webs.com/</a><br>For your spiritual well being ( more important than anything ) <a href="http://muttaqun.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://muttaqun.com/</a>
    </div>
     
  9. Sonic

    Sonic New Member

    53
    0
    0
    nice tips ! i might give that ink method a try soon - would regular fountain pen ink work ?
     
  10. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

    5,803
    107
    63
    Sure, just use the permanent (document grade) type.
     
  11. trobbie66

    trobbie66 New Member

    65
    0
    0
    <div>
    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Sonic wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">nice tips ! i might give that ink method a try soon - would regular fountain pen ink work ? </td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody">drafting inks come in many colors and don't need thinning</span>
    </div><div class="clear"></div><div class="signature_div">
    <br>Trobbie66 <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_cheers.png" alt="cheers" longdesc="28">
    </div>
     
  12. ketansa

    ketansa New Member

    251
    0
    0
    If you dont find the finer Sand papers like 1000, 1500, 2000 then take two pieces of 400 or 600 and rub on eachother with a circular motion, evenly gently with moderate pressure. They will become finer polishers. 1000 can be used too. Choose, and rub according to your need of fineness.
     
  13. tokSick

    tokSick Senior Member

    3,951
    1
    0
    About the linseed oil...<br>Must it be boiled linseed oil or can it be non- boiled?<br>When the slingshot is oiled, can i/do i have to finnish it with glue?
     
  14. denster

    denster New Member

    2
    0
    0
    A tip that will make finishing go much faster. Once you have sanded to about 320grit take a hard smooth object. I use a polished antler tine and bone folder but a glass rod or test tube works well also. Whatever it must be harder than the wood and very smooth. With a moderate amount of pressure rub over the entire surface of the wood. You will be amazed at what you see. What you are doing is burnishing the surface of the wood to a high luster. Then apply the finish of your choice. For what it is worth normal linseed oil, even boiled, is a poor finish that never really dries. If you are staining the wood then burnish after staining.<br>Try it I guarantee you will like it.
     
  15. stej

    stej New Member

    333
    0
    0
    Those of you who use/tried ink. What is order of your steps?<br><br>I would thought <br>1) sanding<br>2) ink<br>3) oil<br>4) polishing (chrome polish ...)<br><br>I saw that Joerg wrote "Then apply the ink and let it dry completely. Resand with fine grit sand paper. Then use car chrome polish and a soft rag. This will remove the dust and also u....". <br>I didn't have ink so I used acrylic paints. Looked good, but after I tried to resand it, the paint went away. It didn't soak into the wood, it was only on the top.<br><br>So, first - is the order (see top of my post) correct?<br>Second - is there difference between ink and some paint (acrylic in my case)?
     
  16. CEZ

    CEZ New Member

    934
    0
    0
    I think acryl is thick and rubbery stuff and doesn't soak as well as ink, it also tends to peel off. If you want to stain your slingshot then try ink or buy wood stain. <br>If you don't care much about the grain then you can find polyurethane stain/finish in different colours. A couple of coats of that give a solid color and it's much more durable than acryl paint.
     
  17. artons

    artons New Member

    249
    0
    0
    the chrome polish must be liquid or not?
     
  18. Ryan Wigglesworth

    Ryan Wigglesworth Senior Member

    1,570
    0
    0
    i use a polish that is not liquid
     
  19. zwillie

    zwillie New Member

    865
    1
    0
    I do it in Denster`s way.
    Zwillie