Extreme lamination?

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by ABH, Mar 15, 2013.

  1. ABH

    ABH New Member

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    Multiplex wood is quite tougher than other woods as its made of quite thin layers of wood and offers more resistance than standard wood, so if the more layers it has the more resistance it has, wat if you laminate hundreds of layers of paper? (which is almost wood) just like japanese katana swords made of hundreds of layers of steel, will this create the most resistent wood in the world or just a huge loss of time?? Thanks for reading
     
  2. onnod

    onnod Im from Holland, isnt that weird?

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    you'll get some kind of micarta/G10 which is quite strong, definately worth a try
     

  3. studer1972

    studer1972 scooter trash

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    I've worked with some very stiff cardboard tubes. I think the hardest thing would be getting enough pressure for a stiff laminate.
     
  4. ABH

    ABH New Member

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    well it will be nice if any of the members of the forum showed us an image of a paper slingshot, Im also thinking about paper bows... I imagine this will need tons of glue though...
     
  5. tokSick

    tokSick Senior Member

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    I heard about prisoners who made strong weapons out of paper and glue or plastic and glue. I made 3 juggling balls for my ex gf's boy out of plastic bags... It was as hard as billiard balls!!!
     
  6. Arturo Borquez

    Arturo Borquez Administrator

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>onnod wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">you'll get some kind of micarta/G10 which is quite strong, definately worth a try</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br>+1 ... is better a textile fabric than paper, glued with polyester or epoxy resin at high pressure = micarta</span>
     
  7. bushcraft kid

    bushcraft kid New Member

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    You can look at it on some of the knife making web sites, they have paper mircarta, but it is expensive so that would be awesome if you made your own, think of the color combinations you could get <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1">
     
  8. ghost0311/8541

    ghost0311/8541 New Member

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    I make it out of felt and burlap
     
  9. FIAAO

    FIAAO Failureisalwaysanoption

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    I think it sounds cool but I´m not sure if it would work so well, I mean, even a thin piece of wood is strong in one direction while a paper is, well... not.<br><br>But I still think you should try. Who knows, you might be onto something really cool! <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2">
     
  10. ABH

    ABH New Member

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    You could make a colourful paper lamination with colours of your own touch, as paper absorbs easiliy paint, and if you make a good contrast of colours it could look pretty good, as you can easily soak into watered ink... And the glued ones dried with cheap white wood glue, I definetly find this a interesting experience... A sort of home made extra thin lamination colourful multiplex board...
     
  11. ABH

    ABH New Member

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    I think board cutting can be useful for comercial slingshots or for cutting specific shapes,but I find natural forks better, there grain is just better, and the natural forks also have there own "personality" they are not the same, they have different shapes, reactions and properties you never know how a roar fork will look like once finished, which is exciting
     
  12. bushcraft kid

    bushcraft kid New Member

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    I agree on the natural forks My Hurricane Hunter fits my hand so perfectly. Also i have gone back to making simple maple forks for shooting rocks, it reminds my of when I was little just now I have TBG <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1"> and know to shoot the biggest rocks possible for accuracy, I love walking down a gravel road and just shooting a can in front of me <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1"><br><br>But some times crazy laminated board cuts are fun, I was thinking you could use construction paper, you could even laminate in some aluminum foil for a cool effect.
     
  13. stej

    stej New Member

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    I think that many people come with similar idea and then they discover micarta. No offense, I'm on the same boat <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"> What glue would you use? I'm not sure if the waterbased glue would be omstrong enough and also if it will dry well because of the laminate thickness..
     
  14. Arturo Borquez

    Arturo Borquez Administrator

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    I believe that a non woven paper (or textile) will be prone to delamination with fork hits ...
     
  15. bushcraft kid

    bushcraft kid New Member

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    I know people make their own for knife handles, they use epoxy resin though.
     
  16. pelleteer

    pelleteer Middle Aged Delinquent

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Arturo Borquez wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">I believe that a non woven paper (or textile) will be prone to delamination with fork hits ...</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br><br>That may be a problem, I agree. Two pieces of homemade paper micarta with a piece of thin metal sandwiched between them might work. Steel would be strongest, but aluminum, brass, or copper could work too and wouldn't have to be treated to prevent rust like steel. If you wanted to go all paper, you may want to make the forks a little higher and with more distance between them than you might normally have, just to minimize fork hit potential. <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_scratch.png" alt="scratch" longdesc="33"></span>
     
  17. Bert the Welder

    Bert the Welder New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>ABH wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">Multiplex wood is quite tougher than other woods as its made of quite thin layers of wood and offers more resistance than standard wood, so if the more layers it has the more resistance it has, wat if you laminate hundreds of layers of paper? (which is almost wood) just like japanese katana swords made of hundreds of layers of steel, will this create the most resistent wood in the world or just a huge loss of time?? Thanks for reading</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br><br>I'm not well versed on the subject but I believe it's not the thin layers themselves that give ply it's stiffness/strength, but how they are put together. The grain of each layer to turned 90* from the preceding one, this eliminates breakage along the grain like with one piece board cuts. Also, the sheets are glued under tons of pressure. This really pushes the glue into the layers of wood making a more solid structure. <br>As for the Japanese tradition of sward making and layering. The hammering, folding, hammering, and so on is to blend in the higher carbon steels into the base metal. This hammer/folding also affects the orientation of the grain structure of the metal (yep, metal has grain...). So, again it's not so much the successive thin layers themselves, but the result of doing them. They'll get into the thousands of layers, incidentally. Another technique is to sandwich a high carbon steel, say O1, billet into a softer steel. Kinda like a hot dog in a bun. The O1 is forge welded into the base steel and when ground, the O1 is left protruding from the other steel as the cutting edge. This results in that gentle wavy line along the length of the blade that is on some swords and knives. ( wavy line can also be made by etching or as a result of quenching the blade with a special clay applied to the cutting edge to cool it differently....OK, I'm rambling on now, sorry..... <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_rolleyes.gif" alt="Rolling Eyes" longdesc="14"><img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_lol.gif" alt="Laughing" longdesc="7">)<br><br>So....paper=no grain=no strength. Lamination's of paper would be strong as a function of the glue used, and you get, like others have stated, a micarta of sorts. A mix of cloth and paper would be better than just paper. Cloth has grain. Paper makes nice colorful accent layers.</span>
     
  18. ABH

    ABH New Member

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    well, you never know until yo try it...
     
  19. Flipgun

    Flipgun Well-Known Member

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    <div>I am doing that now with some acid free card stock in different colors and Mod Podge. I am hoping to use it for scales rather than structural. I have 2 thirty sheet pieces clamped up and smaller piece that is curing on my desk after 2 days it is pretty firm and I am hoping that it will cure harder yet. But Yeah, epoxy would be better. I'll find out I suppose.</div><div class="clear"></div><div class="signature_div">
    <br>Failed perception is when you have a gun, I have a slingshot and you think you are the only one that is armed. <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_lol.gif" alt="Laughing" longdesc="7">
    </div>
     
  20. studer1972

    studer1972 scooter trash

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    I got my order of bearing balls a couple days back. It came in a huge 1/4" hard paper tube. I'm going to try to make a fork out of 3 layers (3/4" total thickness) of it. How should I seal it when it's done?