egg sinkers

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by studer1972, Dec 21, 2013.

  1. studer1972

    studer1972 scooter trash

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    I've tried to find what lead egg sinkers weigh and what they compare to lead ball-wise. I gave up searching and bought some, then weighed them on my kitchen scale. The scale doesn't do fractions of a gram, so I weighed 3 sinkers of each size I have and divided to get the results. I find the nomenclature of egg sinkers is confusing, so I hope this is useful. Egg sinkers come rated by number and fraction, from 10 to 3 and sizes from 1/8 to 3.

    [​IMG]

    I bought a multipack that has #10, 9, 8, & 7 aka 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, and 3/4. I'm not sure what the fractions mean, as they don't match up exactly to that amount of ounces. Regardless, here are my findings. If somebody else has a more granular scale, please update me if you are so inclined.

    Water Gremlin egg sinkers
    #7(3/4) 18 2/3g ~14.5mm (>9/16)
    #8(1/2) 12 1/3g ~1/2
    #9(1/4) 6g ~10mm (>3/8)
    #10(1/8) 3g ~5/16

    I tried shooting these last summer, but it was during my wild shot phase. They weren't the only ammo going any which way but what I wanted, so I don't think it's the shape. I have interest in this shape since it's a similar shape to ancient sling bullets. Anybody else try them?
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013
  2. Ghosth

    Ghosth Over the hill but still swinging!

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    I've tried a few but quickly moved on to cast round lead balls. In my case .45 caliber. I have a mold for the egg's also, but I did feel they were a lot more erratic.
     

  3. coyote-1

    coyote-1 Member

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    So the #7 is about the same weight as a .58 ball (277 grain, 18 gram).
    Presumably the #6 will be around 30 grams or one ounce, similar to a .68 ball.

    Those sinkers, at ranges under 10 yards, ought be roughly as accurate as lead ball. There's no way they are encountering massive aerodynamic deflections. Question: I see prices on those that make lead ball look like a steal. Where are you getting the sinkers? What quantities, what total price?
     
  4. Ravensbull

    Ravensbull New Member

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    I think this is an interesting ammo idea. Considering many folks get good accuracy with home-cast lead cylinders or cut up rerod/allthread, I can't see how these would have any problem either as Coyote-1 just mentioned. It would be nice to see the answers that Studer is after too, to have it documented. I have some of these in my fishing gear but have never tried shooting with them yet, but will now once I dig them out.
     
  5. studer1972

    studer1972 scooter trash

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    Coyote-1: I buy them at WalMart and Fleet Farm from their fishing sections. They come in small bags or in plastic boxes. The small bags contain more or less sinkers depending on size (around 6), and the plastic boxes are variety packs. The bags run around $2 and the boxes around $5.

    http://www.watergremlin.com/my-tacklebox/egg-sinkers/
     
  6. coyote-1

    coyote-1 Member

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    I get 50 Hornady .58 ball for fifteen bucks. Not seeing those sinkers as a cost-effective alternative.
     
  7. kohlqez

    kohlqez Accident-Prone

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    I think egg sinkers are pretty decent ammo, especially if you're slingshot fishing.
    Ravensbull I've never heard of using threaded rod cut up as ammo, anyone had any luck with that?
     
  8. RegulusRubber

    RegulusRubber Junior Member

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    I was also thinking about casting leadballs by myself. The prices for factory manufactured balls went through the roof last years (or more likely, the worth of money drops)
    All you need ist a mould, a meltingpot and lead. You can produce more than you need and sell the surplus.


    http://www.henselgmbh.de/ (Moulds for Roundballs up to 50mm)

    http://www.dixiegunworks.com/product_info.php?cPath=22_101_283&products_id=13066

    New Forest Range© Catapult Ammo Mould 12 X 16mm
    http://www.bellsofhytheonline.com/products.aspx?productid=71

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgdEcu5TvT0&feature=player_detailpage"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgdEcu5TvT0&feature=player_detailpage[/ame]
     
  9. studer1972

    studer1972 scooter trash

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    Coyote: I agree on cost, not sure about efficiency/impact. I can also buy egg weights nearly anywhere, but have to go to a big box store like Cabela's or Gander Mountain to buy lead balls. Overall I think the balls are better, but I need more testing.

    Regulus: yep, Track of the Wolf advises folks to cast their own lead if they use more than 1200 balls per year. It's also fun to use things you make yourself.
     
  10. ruthiexxxx

    ruthiexxxx ruthiexxxx

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    Funny, I thought I'd answered this thread...then realised it was a similar one 'in another place' :)

    The only ones I have tried are quite large ones that weigh in at 38 grammes. These have all the hitting power that one could ask for and seem quite accurate....by my standards at least.

    I was going to go exclusively with these til I realised that my 'lobrounds' at a mere 20 grammes are very much more destructive at a fraction of the cost. (short for 'lobotomiser rounds' for obvious reasons they are 1" lengths of 12mm rebar cut at 45 degrees angle. They cut through steel cans like they were paper and should be devastating on zombie skulls.
    Just N A S T Y !!)
     
  11. coyote-1

    coyote-1 Member

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    You could also go for these:

    http://www.rotometals.com/product-p/leadhighgrade1pound.htm

    Lead weighs approximately 6.5oz per cubic inch, so if you cut these into 5/8" lengths you get nearly 24 grams per shot. Approximately the same weight per shot as the rebar. Cut 'em at an angle, and zombie skulls wouldn't stand a chance.

    That said, they are approximately 3x the price of the rebar.
     
  12. ruthiexxxx

    ruthiexxxx ruthiexxxx

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    That looks good stuff...but would soft lead have the same penetrative power I wonder ? The steel just slices through most stuff
     
  13. coyote-1

    coyote-1 Member

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    It's a good question. One that is somewhat related to a demonstration of a kevlar vest stopping a 9mm bullet, but being easily penetrated by a razor broadhead. Yet that broadhead might glance off a zombie skull while the 9mm crushes its way through.

    The 'answer', insufficient though it seems, is that you can never know until the moment of truth whether your chosen weapon/ammo are the correct choice in that moment. But be assured your rebar lobrounds are now part of my ammo stock :)

    EDIT: Have you tried your lobrounds going through clothing?
    EDIT #2: I'm getting a "multi-ammo" idea for the micarta slingshot I've begun! I have only bent up the internal aluminum frame. First I was considering having insides of plastic honeycomb, for rigidity with light weight. Then I thought "why not make it all hollow, to store 15 or more lead balls?" But now I'm imagining lead balls in the handle, and wood filling the space in the prongs. Then after the Micarta is done drilling a few 1/2" holes in each prong, to store a half-dozen lobrounds. A true tactical slingshot :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2013
  14. Awesome thank you! That will help people prevent return shots when trying different ammo :)
     
  15. Ravensbull

    Ravensbull New Member

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    I shoot a lot of these home casts made with an old Herter's earless splitshot mould. They are still a little out of round when I crimp the split shut but fly true and hit hard. No idea what they weigh, but I would guess around the same as .50-.54 cal. round balls. That is just a standard 5/8" marble in the middle.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 3, 2014
  16. coyote-1

    coyote-1 Member

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    @ ruthie: another thought, though the price would go up even more: 1/2" (or even 9/16") thinwall metal tubing, filled with lead, cut at a 45 degree angle! Would bring all the benefits of both materials, almost like a jacketed pistol round. You could even then make a slice in the leading edges of each angled 'tip', thus obtaining an expanding sharp metal tip that is thrust into the target by the lead interior. It could be truly devastating when hitting zombie flesh.

    @ Ravensbull: the splitshot lead is a conclusion I arrived at too, but I get it by doing purpendicular splits to .58 and .68 musket ball. Lead deforms on impact anyway and therefore transfers more of its energy to target, which makes it better than steel which tends to bounce more. The splits help the deformation process.
     
  17. studer1972

    studer1972 scooter trash

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    Ruthie: yep, I often post the same thing to all 3 of the slingshot forums I follow. :eek:

    re lead vs steel: to each their own, but steel ricochets so much worse than lead. Wouldn't matter so much for hunting, but even up nort' steel bounces back something fierce when it hits a sawhorse, rock, or solid tree. I'm an OK shot when the stars are right, but cases of the wilds happen to me with alarming frequency, so even with a catchbox ricochet can be a problem.

    re lead bars: a mechanic friend came through for me with lead tire weights. going to chunk them up and see how lead bits fly. :D If my father-in-law lets me use his grinder I have some threaded rod to chunk up as well.
     
  18. studer1972

    studer1972 scooter trash

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    Ravensbull: love the shape of those casts. At slingshot velocity, I don't think the roughness will harm aerodynamics but it should improve blunt force trauma. Look at how devastating cubes are in Joerg's extreme ammo video. Lighter steel cubes did slightly more damage than a much heavier tungsten ball of similar size. Makes me want to get a hold of some tungsten bar to cube up. 9mm tungsten cubes?
     
  19. Ravensbull

    Ravensbull New Member

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    What i like to do about casting sprue removal is first, I don't cut the ball off the sprue. Seeing the sprue is cone shaped, and thinnest at the ball, I twist them off, leaving a cleaner bump. I do own flush cut end cutters but don't use them other than for heavier cuts. Even the over pouring veins if the cast isn't tight enough I twist off with needle nose pliers sideways as I work around them. The fun part is putting them all in a coffee can alone or with steel BBs. I think a handful of fine dry sand would work as well and proceed to shake the *#!$ out of them against the walls of the can (not on the plastic lid..) That really helps with the irregularities. I do exactly the same with my cylinders made with Charles' mould design. Anybody else shoot those? Easy to make and very accurate for me!
     
  20. coyote-1

    coyote-1 Member

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    I've not seen the mould design being referenced. Anyone have a link??

    On my further development of ruthie's lobrounds, some research finds that the least expensive tubing for the purpose seems to be 1/2" M grade copper. Its outside diameter is .625", and the cost is less than a dollar a foot. So each piece of ammo would cost @ 25 cents in material.

    I'm rethinking the cuts in the tips. Will wait til I get to a MSPaint program (windows) to render it.