Carving with a kiridashi

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by Longwei2012, Jan 5, 2014.

  1. Longwei2012

    Longwei2012 New Member

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    I was browsing on ebay for carving knives and pocket knives then stumbled uppon the kiridashi and the higonomori. Japanese steel is known for it's fine quality. I have tried looking for reviews one these types of knife, but so far i found nothing to do with carving or whittling. Does anyone have experience with these knives and carving?
    ImageUploadedBySlingshot Forum1388929754.314226.jpg ImageUploadedBySlingshot Forum1388929767.827280.jpg
     
  2. ruthiexxxx

    ruthiexxxx ruthiexxxx

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    I did get a couple of these years ago but didn't find that they suited my carving technique very well so they'll be back in my house in England I suppose.
     

  3. Bushmaster

    Bushmaster New Member

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    The shape of the blade is straight and I prefer a slightly curved short blade with a large ergonomic handle. Woodworking stores such as "Rockler" here in the States stock many types that you can try out at the store before you buy. Spend the money for the protective glove too!
     
  4. Longwei2012

    Longwei2012 New Member

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    @ ruthie
    Why didn't they match your carving technique? What is your technique? And what techniques for carving are there? Is there a technique to recommend? Did you use both knife types?
     
  5. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    The only time I carve with straight blades is when I use a hammer and chisel. For knife carving, I have always used curved blades, and they allow for easier ergonomic flow of the cut. Tilia would be the person to ask for a true authority on the subject, but I have found that when I carve my hand/arm moves in a 'curve', so a curved blade renders better with my motion.

    -Wild Bill
     
  6. Longwei2012

    Longwei2012 New Member

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    @bushmaster
    A lengthier curved blade seems effective indeed.
    I don't know of a place kind enough here that lets you test knives before you buy them. I think that i need to go to ebay or elsewhere online, if i want a carving knife with proper service and good pricing.
    Today i was at the black market in my hometown and this guy tried to convince me that i needed an expensive knife from an unknown manufacturer for carving. It was a small hunting knife type. I refuse to spend $50 on a knife that is not japanese, german or american made. Perhaps a very multifunctional victorinox would be worth the money, but i just don't believe in better quality coming from other places. An odd thinking, but i can't help that.
    How about pocket/folding knives, are there any of those to recommend? The guy said a pocket knife might not be durable when used for carving, is that true?
     
  7. Obl1v1Aus

    Obl1v1Aus Meh!

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    I have a higonomori that is used as a fruit knife, it has a keen edge and would do the job but the hinges aren't designed for the stress it will break pretty quickly.

    As for the kiridashi, i have no idea but i wouldn't mind trying
     
  8. Longwei2012

    Longwei2012 New Member

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    Yes, i think i will also get a chisel and that device to hold things, if i start getting too muscular thumbs
    I thought the kiridashi reminded me a little of a chisel, but no use in that if i can't use a hammer on it. Maybe it suitable for very small things, like sharpening pencils or sticks.
     
  9. Longwei2012

    Longwei2012 New Member

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    Ok, so both knife types are not suitable. And now it's clear why. I'd like to have a higonomori for my purse, so i can always cut food and so, but now i know not to set my mind on these tools for carving.
    Well, then my quest for carving knives must go on.
     
  10. ruthiexxxx

    ruthiexxxx ruthiexxxx

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    Well, for larger pieces and sculpting I use the conventional techniques with full size gouges and mallet with the workpiece securely mounted on a carver's screw or vice.

    But most of the carving I have done was done in the years living on the road and working on smaller pieces. Because of the exigencies of this lifestyle I developed what I call "hand to hand carving".

    In this the wood is held in my left hand and the tool in my right hand. Stability is achieved by locking one thumb against the other and against which it can swivel as the knife or gouge cuts the wood. It is a very effective technique I think although it must be said that:-

    it gives tremendous control

    you will probably lose a certain amount of blood whilst mastering it.

    you will develop wrists of steel and fingers that can crush brazil nuts ;)

    you learn that a knife should have no longer a blade than the bare minimum required for a cut

    the technique is for gouges as well as knives and the style of gouge known as 'block cutters' are ideal.

    The photos are of a few of my favourite knives and gouges
     

    Attached Files:

  11. Longwei2012

    Longwei2012 New Member

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    Yes i've seen those knife types, they are quite affordable too. I might get one of those too. Which one is suitable for allround carving use?

    I also seen this:
    ImageUploadedBySlingshot Forum1389111616.187564.jpg

    I really want that one, a carvin jack from flexcut, but it's so ridiculous expensive i don't want it unless i can find a cheap one on ebay. It does come with a pouch and a sharpening set. So far the cheapest is around $100... Not cheap enough i think. As a beginner i am not spending that money. I might not even like it and then i'm stuck with something expensive i don't use.

    I actually got some coupons i saved from filling in enquetes, which grants me to choose something worth €20 from a website that also sells some knives.
    I found an opinel there.
    ImageUploadedBySlingshot Forum1389112501.627767.jpg
    Ok it's french...
    But it's cheap and now even free.
    I found a lot of positive reviews online so i'll give it a try. I will choose the carbon steel version rather than the stainless steel. It's only €10.
     
  12. studer1972

    studer1972 scooter trash

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    My current EDC is an opinel #8. I don't carve, but it does all the everyday knifely tasks well.
     
  13. FilipNilssob

    FilipNilssob Lactose is my Kryptonite

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    A good carving knife should have a Comfortable handle or else you gonna get blisters. (I cold not work with my hand for a week! :eek:)
    But A curved blade is also recommended like my knife i did a thread about ;) ;)
     
  14. ruthiexxxx

    ruthiexxxx ruthiexxxx

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    OK....Firstly I wouldn't waste money on any Flexcut product. I do have one of their knives (which is almost unused after several years!) and a couple of sets of their palm gouges. You can do much better for much less money!!
    (In fact if you get some industrial grade hacksaw blades you can easily make ones just as good yourself.)

    For a general purpose knife you can't do much better than a carbon steel opinel !!

    But It's not really a knife for woodcarving. A good choice would be the shortest blade of Mora knife you can get (about 2"). Frost make a good one
     
  15. Longwei2012

    Longwei2012 New Member

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    Ok, i already ordered the opinel 8, it should take 2 weeks to arrive. Ugh, why does everything take so long...
    As for the flexcut knives, which knive do you have? Why don't you like it? If they are crappy, i will not think about them anymore. Although i have to say, those foldback knives looked very nice.

    Mora and frost are the same brand right?
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014
  16. ruthiexxxx

    ruthiexxxx ruthiexxxx

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    The Flexcut knife that I have is at 12 o'clock on the photo of knives on the previous page (I tarted it up a bit). Why don't I like 'em ? They just don't FEEL right for carving. i CAN carve with it...and if I was stuck on a desert island with nothing bu my Flexcut knife and gouges I would carry on carving and manage perfectly OK. But to my mind they do not compare with the 'real thing'.
    If you look at that photo again ...in the 11 o'clock and 4 o'clock positions are the classic general carving knife blade shape. These two are by Pfeil of Switzerland and Kirchen of Austria. At the 7 o'clock position is the classic chip carving knife shape which comes in useful for general carving too.
    Incidentally at the 1 o'clock position is one I made up from a craft knife blade and its thinness makes it useful sometimes for very fine detail work.

    Seriously, if you want something like a Flexcut then make your own from a hacksaw blade....making this kind of knife is SO easy...and you may end up carving them too for practice like I did years ago! :)

    Frost is the trade name of most of my scandinavian knives...I may be wrong but I think the name 'Mora' is more generic.

    If the supplier of your Opinel carries their FULL range it is worth ordering their vigneron's pruning knife...very cheap and the same wonderful steel
     
  17. Longwei2012

    Longwei2012 New Member

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    I find the 12 o clock flexcut knife to be looking the least used knife in your range, i should have known. I thought you meant a flexcut folding knife. The 7 o clock blade seems most appealing to me. Did you carve the decoration on the handles yourself? Actually making a knife myself, i'd have to learn carving properly first i think.
    Unfortunately the shop i bought the opinel doesn't have much usefull knifes. They sell all type of products, so each category isn't so big in choice. I was lucky to find the opinel there and to get it free.
     
  18. ruthiexxxx

    ruthiexxxx ruthiexxxx

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    Yes, all the decoration was done as early practice in carving. Some of the handles I made from scratch (like the one at 7 o'clock) and some of the little gouges I forged myself from tool steel.
    I'd be very reluctant to use any kind of folding knife for carving. I know that folders have been used by whittlers for a long time but carving does use a lot of force and something solid would be better.
    If, by carving, we are talking mostly about shaping a slingshot from a rough piece or natural fork ( rather than detailed decorative carving) then I would go for the 2" Mora...no question. Strong and sharp!