Can this be Fixed?

Discussion in 'Show off your homemades!' started by Withak, Nov 17, 2013.

  1. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    Okay folks, I'm reaching out to the fine craftsman here on the forum for help. You may recall seeing my mini bamboo hammer. I mentioned that I had a number of slingshots outlined on that bamboo cutting board for production. Since then, I've got 3 more that are in the finish process. But I have another that I just started doing the rough shaping on yesterday morning when I got my first, inevitable, break. Obviously with a board like this, it's hardly surprising that this happened, but I had found with the other 4 slingshots, this was not a problem.

    I think the difference here is partially due to the size of this one. This is a full hand-sized cut, so the stresses are going to be more obvious along the grain. The break you see below happened while using a drum sanding attachment on my drill press. It may have been the vibration of the sander, I'm not sure. It just appeared while I was working the rough shape.

    So, what do the experts think? Can it be repaired in a way that it can make this usable? My initial thoughts are that simply using glue or epoxy simply won't be strong enough. I know some folks have suggested in the past that you could cut this down the long axis and sandwich a metal or plastic blank. I've also see suggestions that would involve drilling through the slingshot and use some wooden dowels or even bolts to help hold it together.

    With regard to cutting it in half, I have neither a band saw nor a scroll saw, so I think that may be a bit tough to do. I do have a drill press but question whether my level of skill would allow me to accurately drill through this in a straight line.

    I'd like to hear your input. Fix it or scrap it? :confused:
     

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  2. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    I would use Tightbond III. Saturate both sides of the break and then clamp tightly for 24 hours (wipe off the excess after it's clamped with a damp rag). Make sure the clamping is done uniformly about the break to ensure a proper mating. The resultant repair will be stronger than the original wood.

    -Wild Bill
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2013

  3. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    I had the same thing happen when I was building the toilet cabinet. Mounted on the left is a toilet paper holder (which has to be protected in my house due to all of the cats). The door to the TP slides up and back to expose the paper. Well, on the first try of the mechanism, the front of it broke off. I used my trusty Tightbond III, clamped it, and here it is five years later- no problems since.

    -Wild Bill
     

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  4. VWscooby

    VWscooby Senior Member

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    Epoxy the break, countersink a screw and screw it together. Mix sawdust with some more epoxy to cover the screwhead. Finish as normal :)
     
  5. Achso_42

    Achso_42 Senior Member

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    + when you burn it, the glue that soaked into the wood is still intact:D
     
  6. kohlqez

    kohlqez Accident-Prone

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    I'm no expert whatsoever but I think epoxy/wood glue bind it with leather, paracord, or maybe even shrink tubing (like for cars) and you should be ok. definitely worth trying before you trash it I'd say
     
  7. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    True Dat!

    VW Scooby's suggestion is a good one, but since the break is clean I would not suggest it. I'd go with the Tightbond fix. On a break that is more irregular or very difficult to clamp, using the 'screw fix' is a good way to go.

    -Wild Bill
     
  8. Brazilviking

    Brazilviking Thread Hijacker

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    You can fix it. I don't trust in glue only......I would drill 2 holes, from one piece to another, in a parallel direction. Cut 2 nails, the thickest you can get and join the 2 pieces with hte strong glue and clamp it tight!
    Just like we fix....bones?
     

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  9. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    Wow! Great responses folks! And so fast too :eek:

    I've never used Titebond (WB) before, so I will certainly look into that option. The ideas of both the screw (VW) and the nails (BV) are both good ones and kind of along the lines of what I was thinking, at least in terms of my skill set.

    So, good suggestions in hand, the next question is this - any recommendations on how to carefully drill into the side of this thing and keep the bit nice and straight in the piece? I have a drill press as well as several regular drills. What I don't have is any kind of jig to help hold an awkward shape like this in such a way that the bit goes in nice and straight. Thoughts on that?

    Thanks again for everyone's great responses!
     
  10. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    The scrap from your initial cut-out will work for a drilling form. But I'm not convinced of the drilling repair... It's more work than really needed to fix it.

    -Wild Bill
     
  11. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    I strongly recommend BV's method, and further I don't think you should be too concerned about drilling straight. In fact,if you drill the two holes into different angles from each other, the stability will improve. Drill the holes a bit too wide to make room for the glue, and roughen up the nail with a file. I would even use a hacksaw (or an angle grinder if you are lazy) to cut lots of notches into the nail to give the glue some purchase.

    EDIT: Don't forget the vise test after the glue has set (give it 48 hours or so).
     
  12. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    I may be committing a sin by disagreeing with Joerg, but on a clean break like this, a celluloid glue is a perfect fix. The glue I mentioned chemically mimics the natural structure of the wood and makes a repair that is stronger than the wood itself. For a more drastic break, I would agree with Joerg and BV.

    -Wild Bill
     
  13. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    Well, as long as the vise test is performed, I am Ok with any kind of repair I guess.

    I have used the nail/pin plus glue method several times though and it always worked.
     
  14. RegulusRubber

    RegulusRubber Junior Member

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    I would prefer Ponal express. It is fast wood glue. But it seems that Titebond III Glue is the same.

    It seems that you have already tried to glue it together. That would be bad because it is very hard to remove the old glue.
    Freshly broken wood can be repaired perfectly by using wood glue and it will never break again at glued part only next beside it.

    Just do it like WildBill told in the second post.

    I don’t know what kind of wood it is but it looks like that it tends to break very easy. Perhaps it is better to start new with another peace of wood.
     
  15. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    When I cut this one out, the intention was to make one that could handle some strong bands - maybe double TBG. So I do want to be certain that any repair will add to the strength of the slingshot. My one concern from the beginning with the bamboo board was how much stress it could take. The smaller slingshots have done very well up to single TBG. And vice tests of using some of the scrap have shown it quite strong against the grain, not quite as strong along the grain. I tend to play it safe when it comes to something like this since the potential for injury is there if something does fail.

    So, with that in mind, and with all due respect to some very fine opinions offered here, I think I'm going to make an attempt at repair by using the nail method. I like your idea, Bill, and I plan to pick up some of that Titebond, looks like very effective stuff, but I also have a concern for future breaks not only along the break, but along the other grain lines as well, so the thought of bolstering the overall strength of the slingshot with the nails is appealing to me.

    Joerg, thank you for chiming in as well. And a thanks again to everyone else who offered up their suggestions. I'll be sure to share the final repair with everyone.
     
  16. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    You're right. Originally, there was only a small split, so I attempted a repair with wood glue that I've done before. After it cured for about 24 hours, I put a little pressure on it and it gave way, so I pushed it further since I knew it would probably have to go further before I could make a reasonable repair. This is bamboo, so not technically wood, but grass. I don't know how a product like Titebond will do with bamboo, but yes, I am concerned about another adjacent grain line splitting later, so I think the nail idea gives me more assurance of a strong repair.
     
  17. Brazilviking

    Brazilviking Thread Hijacker

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    The direction of the crack separates one fork from the other. Imagine tridimentionally how the drawing forces are going to act. It twists the forks one against other and pulls back the separated tip. Sometimes even a whole board without cracks cannot resist. There must be a component that resists this forces to keep the frame. Basic orthopaedics for ostheosynthesis. Glue can resist several shots, but the continuous stress will cause it to break. A harder elastic material is necessary. Steel.
    Glue fixes, steel keeps it!
     
  18. Flipgun

    Flipgun Well-Known Member

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    Sometimes you work real hard to make firewood. The fact that it broke at all makes it suspect. My recommendation is to let this one pass and move on to the next.
     
  19. flicks

    flicks ...lost in the woods....

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    I agree with Flipgun. Sure, you can repair it and even if you epoxy the crack it will not break at the same point, BUT the wood seems to have the tendency to break. I would really suggest to say Bye Bye. Hey, work on the new one and you will forget the one who left you very quick :D
     
  20. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    I appreciate the sentiment. I have not yet put a tremendous amount of work into this, so not much is lost if I choose to scrap it. But, I'm also all for learning something new in the process. So, I will attempt the repair just to see what happens. Of course, I'll give it some strength testing after the repair and see what happens. I'm curious to see what comes of it. If the repair doesn't work, then at least I'll have some new experience in hand.