Bulgaria - No regulations, no hunting/fishing, no self defense.

Discussion in 'Laws and Regulations' started by UnholySaint, Mar 9, 2017.

  1. UnholySaint

    UnholySaint New Member

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    Bulgaria has maybe the most absurd legal conditions for weapon ownership and self defense in Europe. According to the current weapon regulation wall only three types of weapons exist:

    - Firearms (anything using explosion or combustion to launch solid projectile). Modern ones need permit. Self-made are illegal. Ones created before 01.01.1900 are unregulated. Replicas of weapons from before 01.01.1900 are also unregulated in case they are incapable of operating with smokeless gunpowder. Black gunpowder however is regulated as explosive, so firing such weapons/replicas is illegal if you lack proper permits.
    - Gas and blank guns (firearms that do not launch solid projectile /do not ask me/). No permit, no registration (aside from traders having to keep record of sales).
    - Pneumatics. The definition is "use gas pressure to launch pellet or BB (used term 'сачма' means both) from the inner side of a barrel" (blow guns, arrow shooters and so on do not fit here). No permit. Must be registered if muzzle energy is above 24 joule (traders have to record sales even if below).

    Aside of this there are regulations on explosives and there is also a ratified international treaty that classifies high velocity mass drivers (anything, capable of accelerating object with mass higher than 0.5g to speed higher than 1.5km/s) and high power lasers (i think it was over 2KW/mm2) as "usable as weapons" and forbids private individuals to own such devices.

    For hunting and fishing there is explicit ban only on crossbows, but to get your hunting/fishing permit you need to get different ritual equipment (explicitly specified types of firearms/gear), pass proper initiations (prove you know how to use the ritual equipment) and follow the hunting rituals (that cover all details of the ritual equipment usage process, and leave no place for heresy).

    Everything else is not legally considered weapon and is not regulated. There are even no legal terms to describe the concept of difference between melee and ranged weapons. By the letter of wall you can create, own and carry anything that is not amongst what was listed above.

    Of cause if police finds that you walk in a middle of a city equipped like medieval mercenary they may (or may not) try to confiscate something (depends on place, situation, age and appearance), and with sufficient motivation will find plenty of ways to go around the lack of direct legal base. Usually places and situations that may lead to this are predictable and avoidable, but even in case you draw attention there can be no legal consequences.

    Still it is advisable to carry things that are either classified as tools (my folding knife is Walter Tac Tool for example) or considered to be self-defense oriented (pepper spray, zap gun..). Everything else must be considered expendable, so using your favorite, or hard to make/expensive slingshot for everyday carry is not recommended. I for example carry a weaved short sling (no paracord, not good for sling) and theraband monotube with pouch (BTW, nice for launching 15-20 .177 BB's) - both cost much less than their ammo (each sling bullet is 90g lead, several pepper paintballs for the tube...).

    The catch is that while you can own and carry almost any weapon there is simply no such thing as self defense in Bulgaria. Theoretically there is something called "reasonable self defense" in the wall, but to have even a slim chance to plead it one must be Kung-Fu master, capable of neutralizing any number of enemies without causing any noticeable physical or psychical (in case the offenders are stray dogs) damage. Practically there are only two types of self defense: illegal and translegal (involving oligarchs, high ranking government and force officials, gipsies, pseudo-Syrian immigrants and citizens of certain foreign counties).

    As result of this caring either legal or illegal firearm is completely meaningless (if you are not translegal) - in both cases using it for self defense will only increase your sentence, adding either abuse of permit or illegal ownership (still with illegal one you have chance to pass as criminal and get probation instead of jail). Better stick to the wide choice of "non-weapons".
     
  2. Flipgun

    Flipgun Well-Known Member

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    Ummh, ... Welcome to the forum? :confused:
     

  3. Knallfrosch

    Knallfrosch Senior Member

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    Welcome to the forum. Thats a well written article.
     
  4. JimRhodo

    JimRhodo Junior Member

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    I got a bit lost in irony, metaphor, predictive text and translation. But it was a fun read. I think.
     
  5. UnholySaint

    UnholySaint New Member

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    Sorry, i maybe went somehow over the top with irony, but try to imagine this: You are a local and just survived attack of pack of stray dogs by wounding or killing some of them. However there are witnesses and if they speak then according to state regulations you have to go to jail.

    If you look at things from this point of view perceiving state regulations as a common laughing matter is just what allows us here to avoid mass killings.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2017
  6. JanP

    JanP Junior Member

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    I love to see the different ways on how countries "create" their legal aspects of weapons. Arm rests on a toy in Germany, totally illegal ( up to 3 years of jail for just having one at home), slingbow with almost 100 J power, a toy. Softair guns with more than half a Joule power, already a weapon where you need a license for to carry it. Throwing knives, ninja throwing stars, Balisong, all of these come right out of hell... Jörg's most dangerous toy (pressurized air arrow rifle)... guess... a toy. I get your aspect of irony very well, that is the only way to deal with this nonsense. We should make a collection of this kind of nonsense regulations from all over the world.
     
  7. Yeah, unfortunately many places have pointless and unreasonable weapon laws like those. We're finally changing some of those here in the US, but there are still plenty left to go. (our stupid switchblade bans, the high capacity magazine ban, the ca definition of an "assault weapon" and so on....)

    I gotta assume it's far worse in other places. At least here we have several prominent pro 2nd groups and lobbyists.
     
    Jbocajs likes this.
  8. JimRhodo

    JimRhodo Junior Member

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    But then again...

    AK 47s: I've never even seen one. In Africa kids get to shoot them. At people.
    As for land mines I don't worry about them in Scotland.

    Legislation. Can't live with it. Can't live without it.
     
  9. JanP

    JanP Junior Member

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    Even I had the chance to shoot a modern AK-47 (of course, Germany, so only semi automatic)
    I am just amused about the differences...
    Illegal Weapon: Slingshot with Armrest and 2 Joule
    Weapon: Airsoft with more than 0.5 Joule
    Toy: Crossbow with 50 Joule
    Illegal Wapon: Ninja Throwing Stars
    Weapon: Gas Pistol
    Toy: Verminator MK2 DE with 77 Joule
     
  10. JimRhodo

    JimRhodo Junior Member

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    Inconsistency. The bane of legislation, marriage and home brew beer.
     
  11. JanP

    JanP Junior Member

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    Brewing beer, making wine is OK here. Destilling beer or wine gets more "difficult" ;-)
     
  12. UnholySaint

    UnholySaint New Member

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    Ah, the oil corporations with their fear of home made alcohol fuels and the bans they enforce...

    At least Germany is one of the older EU members and there are not so many bans. When Bulgaria entered EU they banned home production of everything that contains alcohol, except when made in very small quantity and never sold. They even banned a popular local drink called "Bozah" - baked wheat, millet or rye flour with sugar and water left to ferment (contains ~2-3% alcohol). Now shops sell wheat with aspartame as"Bozah", "Bio Boutiques" sell wheat with sugar and added chemistry to prevent fermentation at ~5 times the price, while police patrols pursue the "forbidden compound trafficants" who roam around with trunks, filled with home made real Bozah bottles and sell it to the people...
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2017
  13. Krum's Dynasty

    Krum's Dynasty New Member

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    BULGARIAN . KNIFE . LAWS

    NO KNIFE RESTRICTIONS. ABSOLUTELY ZERO. Automatic knives, balisong knives, gravity knives, daggers – are all allowed. No restrictions on length of blade. No restrictions on telescopic batons and brass knuckles either.


    TASERS are also allowed for civilian usage, as well as SABRE law enforcement grade pepper sprays.


    BOWS & CROSSBOWS are allowed too. No permit for them.

    KNIVES ARE BANNED ONLY IN BURGAS (CITY). You can't carry in public places. Municipality law overrules state law. Means if you're carrying a knife and you're in your own car, and you're parked in front of your apartment building, or on a public sidewalk, that's still considered a public place and your knife will be confiscated and you — fined. They can't arrest you for that, but can fine you.

    BURGAS is a pretty dull place to be anyways so I'll avoid it at all costs. Most crime-ridden area in Bulgaria and most of the criminal organisations are located there, and in Sunny Beach (a Resort near Burgas).

    BULGARIAN . GUN . LAWS

    FIREARMS are on a permit. Allowed for self-defense as well as for competitive shooting (IPSC). You have to have a citizenship. Partial background checks (one must not have a criminal record). You then go through a shooting course (pass rate is 99.9%). No limit on how many pistols/revolvers you can later own.

    SHOTGUNS only allowed for hunting, not for self-defense.

    CARBINES only allowed for hunting and competitive shooting (IPSC), not for self-defense.

    SOURCE: Me, a native citizen who has been actively carrying knives and other weapons for 15 years. Definitely the most liberal weapon laws in Europe, no other country can beat.
     
  14. JanP

    JanP Junior Member

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    great text and good description. I don't know so many places in BG, yet, only been to Sofia and Panagyurishte a couple of times. So, basically, carrying my knive and possibly a slingshot (not in Sofia, there are no places for fun like that) would be ok? I still hope for another visit to Plovdiv this year, but this doesn't depend on me ;-)

    And btw: Welcome to the madhouse of rubber based fun