best way to dry out natural frames

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by The Art Of Weapons, Apr 14, 2013.

  1. <div>I have just cut all of the forks that i could off a fallen tree in my garden and since i have not made many natural forks before (i know i am a noob) what would be the best way to dry them out without cracking them? i know that you can put it in a microwave for about 10 mins and you can also just leave it on a radiator overnight but what is the best way?<br>the forks are from a rhododendron tree<br><a href="http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=9&u=18169739" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img src="http://i77.servimg.com/u/f77/18/16/97/39/ssq_0010.jpg" border="0" alt=""></a>
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    <br>I love making slingshots and slingshot crossbows<br>check out my youtube channel <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/theartofweapons/featured" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">here</a> for more!<br><img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_lol.gif" alt="Laughing" longdesc="7">
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  2. Saderath

    Saderath Senior Member

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    The best way is to seal the tips and forget about them! <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1">
     

  3. <div>
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    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Saderath wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">The best way is to seal the tips and forget about them! <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1">
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    <span class="postbody"><br>how long until you can remember about them?</span>
    </div><div class="clear"></div><div class="signature_div">
    <br>I love making slingshots and slingshot crossbows<br>check out my youtube channel <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/theartofweapons/featured" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">here</a> for more!<br><img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_lol.gif" alt="Laughing" longdesc="7">
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  4. stej

    stej New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>The Art Of Weapons wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Saderath wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">The best way is to seal the tips and forget about them! <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1">
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    <span class="postbody"><br>how long until you can remember about them?</span>
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    <span class="postbody"><br><br>+1 <br>I weigh my forks from time to time and make records about that. Then I'm sure when the time comes. Anyway, it's much more demanding than microwaving <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2"></span>
     
  5. Werdna8

    Werdna8 New Member

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    On research for another project I found most popular recommended 1 year per inch think. Seal the ends very important probably want to remove the bark too.
     
  6. stej

    stej New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Werdna8 wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">On research for another project I found most popular recommended 1 year per inch think. Seal the ends very important probably want to remove the bark too.</td></tr>
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    <span class="postbody"><br><br>Remove bark only when you are sure that it won't crack. Oak in my office cracked a lot (high temperature), but much thicker oak fork didn't crack because it was outside and was loosing it's water much more slowly.</span>
     
  7. onnod

    onnod Im from Holland, isnt that weird?

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    removing the bark can cause extra cracks actually, because the fork dries faster. just dip the tips in woodglue and leave them
     
  8. Saderath

    Saderath Senior Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>The Art Of Weapons wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">
    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Saderath wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">The best way is to seal the tips and forget about them! <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1">
    </td></tr>
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    <span class="postbody"><br>how long until you can remember about them?</span>
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    <span class="postbody"><br><br>If you scratch a little bit of the bark off (not full through to the wood) with a knife you will see the next day or so the mid section will have changed color depending of the type of wood<br><br>So you can remember them all of it should be that "second day" color when debarked<br>Which means it is dry!</span>
     
  9. Truth Hunter

    Truth Hunter New Member

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    <font color="black"><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: normal"><font face="Cambria">I have carved many morel walking sticks and<br>yes seal the ends. This can be done with paint, wax, polyurethane, super glue, and<br>as said wood glue&hellip;</font></span></font><br><br><br><font color="black"><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: normal"><font face="Cambria">Removing bark will make stick dry out quicker<br>and increase chance of cracking.</font></span></font><br><br><br><font color="black"><font face="Cambria"><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: normal">I always cut the stick longer so that after<br>it dries I can cut the cracks off. Even<br>with sealing the ends it seem cracks form on the tips. </span></font></font><br><br><br><font color="black"><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: normal"><font face="Cambria">This is just a thought you may want to put<br>them in a zip lock bag to slow down the drying process. I have done this with<br>twig carving forks. </font></span></font>
     
  10. marvtommo

    marvtommo New Member

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    So far ive only had one crack because i rushed it. I leave them to dry for a week or so then take off the bark and leave another bit longer. Seal with varnish when complete. Just try and see how they go. Too much heat too soon will crack.
     
  11. Bert the Welder

    Bert the Welder New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Truth Hunter wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">
    <font color="black"><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: normal"><font face="Cambria">I have carved many morel walking sticks and<br>yes seal the ends. This can be done with paint, wax, polyurethane, super glue, and<br>as said wood glue&hellip;</font></span></font><br><br><br><font color="black"><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: normal"><font face="Cambria">Removing bark will make stick dry out quicker<br>and increase chance of cracking.</font></span></font><br><br><br><font color="black"><font face="Cambria"><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: normal">I always cut the stick longer so that after<br>it dries I can cut the cracks off. Even<br>with sealing the ends it seem cracks form on the tips. </span></font></font><br><br><br><font color="black"><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: normal"><font face="Cambria">This is just a thought you may want to put<br>them in a zip lock bag to slow down the drying process. I have done this with<br>twig carving forks. </font></span></font>
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    <span class="postbody"><br><br>This is the ultimate way. Also varies with different types of wood. Use a could as sacrificial testers are try the slow microwave method and the peeled off bark, air dry method. See what happens, go from there.</span>
     
  12. Tysonspapa

    Tysonspapa New Member

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    agree with truth hunter. i do the same.
     
  13. tokSick

    tokSick Senior Member

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    I got four forks drying and i will try different methods. But i think, leaving them drying is the best( longest) way. I HATE CRACKS!!!
     
  14. Glaiceana

    Glaiceana Junior Member

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    I guess if the forks are thicker they will be less likely to crack but will take longer to dry, or does that not matter? I think I would just leave mine to dry naturally, don't mind waiting <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2">
     
  15. MedievalSlingshot13

    MedievalSlingshot13 New Member

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    I set my frames in a place that is not too dark, but night terribly light, either.<br>I try to avoid the wood drying out and cracking, but since I live in the desert, it's pretty hard.
     
  16. Bert the Welder

    Bert the Welder New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Glaiceana wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">I guess if the forks are thicker they will be less likely to crack but will take longer to dry, or does that not matter? I think I would just leave mine to dry naturally, don't mind waiting <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2">
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    <span class="postbody"><br><br>Thickness doesn't matter. Look at the ends of a cut log. Does the same. It's the tension build-up in the wood, from drying, that is released, causing the cracking. Welding cast iron does the same thing, incidentally. <br><br>Now, I've not tries it, but tightly wrapping the fork with string(non stretchy kind) may help prevent cracking with some woods when speed drying. That's just a theory.</span>
     
  17. stej

    stej New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Bert the Welder wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">
    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Glaiceana wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">I guess if the forks are thicker they will be less likely to crack but will take longer to dry, or does that not matter? I think I would just leave mine to dry naturally, don't mind waiting <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_smile.gif" alt="Smile" longdesc="2">
    </td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br><br>Thickness doesn't matter. Look at the ends of a cut log. Does the same. It's the tension build-up in the wood, from drying, that is released, causing the cracking. Welding cast iron does the same thing, incidentally. <br><br>Now, I've not tries it, but tightly wrapping the fork with string(non stretchy kind) may help prevent cracking with some woods when speed drying. That's just a theory.</span>
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    <span class="postbody"><br><br>In my experience some kinds of wood are more likely to crack when they are thick, especially local kind of dog wood. If the branch is so thin that it won't need any rasping and is good as it this, then I'm almost sure that it won't crack (still speaking about this particular kind of wood).</span>
     
  18. it turnes out that the tree was already dead before it fell down!
    i managed to make this laminate fork from it!!
     

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  19. FIAAO

    FIAAO Failureisalwaysanoption

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    Very nice Taow! Cool work!