bad slingshot building error

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by Alukuchen, May 19, 2013.

  1. Alukuchen

    Alukuchen Senior Member

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    I tried to make a steel slingshot featuring the clamp on method.
    Stupid me tried to cold bend the steel bar and almost hurt himself badly at the end when it snapped.
    The actual (warm bent) slingshot will probably come wednesday. :p
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fSN52uOdEM"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fSN52uOdEM[/ame]
     
  2. RBurke83

    RBurke83 New Member

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    Nice shop though!
     

  3. BrPio

    BrPio .

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    Maybe this will be a little helpful for you. In my work I'v cold bent steel a lot. Two ways, for higher carbon content steels I soften the steel, (heat it bright red and let it slow cool). Other than that I use A36 mid carbon or Woots low carbon content almost pure iron, can bend it tell the cows come home).
     
  4. Flipgun

    Flipgun Well-Known Member

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    Everybody gets a near miss from time to time.
     
  5. Alukuchen

    Alukuchen Senior Member

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    @BrPio
    Hmm this was one random old piece of steel that had been lying around for at leat 20 years. I don't know what kind of steel it is but I already wondered why it was that hard to bend. maybe it was higher carbon steel and brittle. "Can be bent till the cows come home" :D Thats the ants pants ^^
     
  6. Rolf

    Rolf New Member

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    Never had this problem with my stainless steel forks. But they were much harder to bend than normal steel.
     
  7. Gute Besserung!

    Handschuhe können auch manchmal helfen.

    Joe
     
  8. Slagskimmer Mike

    Slagskimmer Mike thinks TBG smells better than roses

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    I remember learning that with low-carbon steels, like common dimensional bar stock, hot rolled bars bend well, but cold rolled mild steel will crack.

    I dont know a great way to tell the difference except cold rolled usually comes out more rectangular and has a smother finish on the surface. Mystery steel lying around just is what it is...

    Glad this was only a close call, haven't we all had our share.
     
  9. RBurke83

    RBurke83 New Member

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    Something definately went wrong there, that steel looks like at least 3/16ths...and it cracked by hand literally. Maybe was work hardened beyond it's capacity?
     
  10. pelleteer

    pelleteer Middle Aged Delinquent

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    SNAP! :eek: Man, that could have been nasty. Good thing you didn't end up impaling your wrist or slashing it open. Glad you're okay. :cool:
     
  11. squidget

    squidget Junior Member

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    see how when you grind and cut the steel the sparks are bright whitish that is a sign of a higher than normal carbon steel.
    as a rule of thumb (Bert can correct me here if i got it backwards) the redder the spark off grinding/cutting the lower carbon the whiter/bluer the higher the carbon.
    also when you were putting in the centre punch marks there was a ringing that may have been the echo on the video but a ringing is another indication of high carbon content.
     
  12. BrPio

    BrPio .

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    A little fun fact on carbon. Most of my steels used for bladesmithing I get from scrap. So I need to have ways to find rough carbon content. A trick I learned to find carbon that's over 1000 years old is the grind test. In old days a hand powered wheel would be used. Grind a section of the metal, study the sparks. Less sparks or sparks that look like just lines is lower carbon. Steel with more sparks or stars at the ends of the lines are higher carbon. It does however take some time watching of different steels to get it accurate (took me 3 years to get it right), but a novice can get a general idea. And it's not reliable for alloys, just simple steels. "Till the cows come home", it's a funny old saying we got here. We herd the cows into the mountains for summer, and bring them back for winter. So when people see the cows coming home they know the summer/ long time has passed. Kinda like now that I have been talking till the cows come home.:rolleyes: