Anyone know how to fix this?

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by Cubanizm, Sep 19, 2013.

  1. Cubanizm

    Cubanizm Junior Member

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    I started working on this piece a week ago.

    As I filed down closer to the heartwood, I began to get a few holes & spaces...

    I have heard of people using saw dust and epoxy but have no idea how to do it.

    What about super glue? I heard of people using super glue before but do not know how that works either. Would that help or no? I think it might just be used for finishing purposes...

    Any suggestions would be GREAT.

    I can use a wood filler epoxy but would hate to see white fill spots in such a nice grain of wood.

    The type of wood is plum but not sure of the excact variety
     

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  2. Brazilviking

    Brazilviking Thread Hijacker

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    Does it compromises the wood resistance? There is aways the option of doing nothing.
    You should get some epoxy glue, slow drying, and mix with the dust crom the wood, apply on the defects, wait cor the "cure" of the glue, file it to shape back to the wood.... And sand, sand, sand.
    A finish coat of epoxy, poly or lacqueur may be necessary in the end. Marks will remain.
     

  3. BeMahoney

    BeMahoney Builder of things

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    This stuff is awesome!

    Hi Cubanizm,

    this here is licensed by the french marine for their boat decks;

    http://www.letonkinois.net/english/index.htm

    They have some transparent (really like glass!!) filling matter!
    (I cant find right now)

    That double cooked linseed/chinese nut oil is absolutely amazing;
    mixed with gelomat mattening liquid you would receive a matte
    surface which is somehow undescribeable.. (like micro-crystals or
    grit-blasted..)

    Greetings,

    Be


    Pics show the "smoked-oak" lid of our laundry-funnel
     

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    Last edited: Sep 19, 2013
  4. dolomite

    dolomite Banned

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    it would look cool to use just epoxy so you can see the defects, use 60min set and brush it on with a disposable foam brush and you can sand and polish as desired for glassy look. or do fibreglass resin and dip it and let it hang till cured, obviously don't use any glass just resin.
     
  5. greenevegiebeast

    greenevegiebeast New Member

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    Fiber glass and a clear epoxy. If done corectle it woul help strengthen the fork and give a deep shine.
     
  6. flicks

    flicks ...lost in the woods....

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    When there is no way to remove an optical defect, you have to integrate it in the design. I would use slow dying epoxy (as suggested by BV) colored with a few drops of ink in red Apply it on the defect and after curing sand it down to the wood so that just the marks will be filled with the colored resin.
    It is more or less an experiment. You don't know how it will come out, until it is finished. Maybe you will be mad with me afterwards... ;)
    You can leave it as well as it is. It is not too bad and you can apply a resin or a poly finish..
     
  7. dolomite

    dolomite Banned

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    Flicks, i like the ink idea,gonna have to try it sometime.
     
  8. xXdoomXx

    xXdoomXx Junior threadjacker ag. J

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    from what ive seen the sling looks good but them cracks dont :p i have them on most of my slings just go over it with 40 grit or a file works best with me :)

    j
     
  9. Baller-Bub

    Baller-Bub New Member

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    Hi
    You can use pure Sanding dust to fill the gaps, and apply a drop
    of cyanoacrylate glue to it. this will take a while to cure, but you can speed up with a wet Dowel.
    Or you take slightly airtight container where Slingy fits in, should be from PP/PE, soak the Slingy in Superglue (cyanoacrylate), and poke a hole for your
    vacuum cleaner in the top of the container. The PP/PE makes sure the slingy doesn´t stick toit.
    Set the soaked slingy under vacuum for a few (maybe ten) minutes.
    This makes stabilised Wood.
    Greets
     
  10. G_Y

    G_Y aiming the less

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    Thank you for this nice method in curing wood, i will test it out.
    Hobbyists use baking soda (Backpulver) with cyanacrylat glue when there is something to fill quickly.
    For example if there is a hole too wide they put in the part to assemble and fill the rest with baking powder followed by a drop of superglue.
     
  11. Lacumo

    Lacumo Member

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    The imperfections are a significant part of the character of the wood, so I'd leave them as they are. A "bowling alley"-smooth and perfect finish might be right for an artistically-done board cut laminate frame, but a I think a natural frame should look natural--knots, surface imperfections and all.
     
  12. BeMahoney

    BeMahoney Builder of things

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    I think filling cavities always has to be seen in combination
    with the desired finish.. Cyanacrylat will not be able to absorb any oiling..
    and if you go for PU (plastic) you can use that for filling as well..
    you might just have to treat those cavities more often.

    Consider to stay within one coating "system"..

    Greetings,

    Be
     
  13. dolomite

    dolomite Banned

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    You could always GFLEX it. stuff is amazing! you can use it to repair underwater damage on boats while the boat is still in the water.
     
  14. dutch_slingshot

    dutch_slingshot Just a Dutch guy

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    in holland we have something called vloeibaar hout. it means something like liquid wood.
    it looks like some sort of playdo but with wood color, when it dries, you almost dont see the marks anymore!
     
  15. Cubanizm

    Cubanizm Junior Member

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    Should I purchase the cyanoacrylate (super glue ) in thin, medium or thick?

    Or does it not make a difference?

    Stabilizing the wood sounds like a good idea... but much more time consuming than I had hoped for.... But definitely something I would like to try in future projects.
     
  16. Baller-Bub

    Baller-Bub New Member

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    Hey Cubanizm
    For stabilizing wood you need the thinnest, most liqiud you can get.
    It has to soak deep into the structure.
    If you use very dense, heavy wood, you should demp it a little, so that its pores open.
    Actually this was meant to "harden" soft and weak woods, like poplar.
    But it also makes harder wood watertight and fills cracks, due to the vacuum and the capillary attractrion.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2013
  17. Flipgun

    Flipgun Well-Known Member

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    It looks like you were down to 80grit? I would ignore it and keep working down to the finer grits. As I got to the finishing grades, I would soak in BLO to preserve and do a wet sand with the Blo. The slurry formed would fill the spaces. after it dried, I would sand with 1500-2000 grit, buff it with 0000 steel wool and finish it.
    Just remember. Sometimes we work real hard for nothing.
     
  18. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    If you just want to oil the frame, then you may not do anything. Such imperfections do not endanger the stability of the fork, usually - and if they do, glue isn't going to fix that anyway. Don't trust glue too much.

    Here are two pics from a fork that I made a year ago, from Sambucus (Elder):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    As you can see the imperfections give it character, but as they are in the grain direction stability is not an issue.

    If you want a polyurethane finish, then you must close the holes. I always use normal epoxy glue (2 component) and mix it with the saw dust of the same wood. This will not have the same color as the wood so you can later on see the repaired spot, but it allows for a very even surface. After the poly coats have been applied, the looks will last virtually forever.

    Here is one I made three years ago - the worm holes are closed with epoxy, the coating covered it all up.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]