Another Slingbow

Discussion in 'Show off your homemades!' started by Mithrandir, May 20, 2012.

  1. Mithrandir

    Mithrandir New Member

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    Based off Joerg's 120lb slingbow with speargun rubber. It's made from 3/4 multiplex roughly 31" H 6" W, and it's pretty light and sturdy. <br><br>The base is different to add more weight to the bottom to use for a club and It looks pretty good If you as me. I am only using the bands from my zombie slingbow for now until I purchase the speargun rubber. <br><br>Here It is after a few hours of rasp and file work, The string stops still need to be cut out.. If i had a vice i could work faster and better but for now my hands will do haha thanks for stopping by, check It out later when It's finished...<br><br><img src="http://i288.photobucket.com/albums/ll198/marshmellllow/001-7.jpg" border="0" alt="">
     
  2. CaptainBacon

    CaptainBacon Knowledgeable Man

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    That piece at the bottom will make band changing much more labor intensive that Joerg's model, but it's looking good so far. Are you going to throw on handle scales?
     

  3. e_monster55

    e_monster55 New Member

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    I feel i must add (tough I'm not trying to be all-knowing here) That Jorg's handle is a bit flawed, you should look at pictures of archery bow handles and see how they are shaped, a good handle allows the user's hand to flow into the same position on the grip (key for accuracy) and prevents wear and tear on the fins of the arrow that may come off due to friction and contact with the handle. I recognize that it is a Rubber powered bow, but it still launches arrows and as such, the handle still needs to be designed like that of a conventional bow.
     
  4. onnod

    onnod Im from Holland, isnt that weird?

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    look pretty good, hope to see it finished soon
     
  5. cbsmith111

    cbsmith111 New Member

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    I was thinking about these. The best way to make it is with the handle offset from the limbs so that the string/bands are in alignment with the tip and the rear of the arrow. The way these are made the arrow is going to be slanted slightly outwards in the same direction as the side of the bow you rest it on. I just don't know an easy way to do it that would be strong enough.
     
  6. smurfeater25

    smurfeater25 New Member

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    Well long bows have the same problem with the arrows resting on the side of the bow. Just because the arrow doesnt line up with the string doesnt mean you cant be accurate with it.
     
  7. brat boon

    brat boon New Member

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    <div>Nice</div><div class="clear"></div><div class="signature_div">
    <br><strong>at school, I am a slingshot expert</strong> <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1"><br><br>on this forum a noob <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_neutral.gif" alt="Neutral" longdesc="20">
    </div>
     
  8. Tysonspapa

    Tysonspapa New Member

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    it will be accurate enough, just aim over the arrow.
     
  9. gtmcfar

    gtmcfar New Member

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    I think that if the arrow is not lined up perfectly with the direction of flight, it will still be accurate but will fly slower due to energy wasted in arrow flex. This is probably a small percentage but downrange that extra energy may be needed. Every modern archery manufacturer does a riser cutout so it is probably worthwhile.
     
  10. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    Guys, my slingbow is designed like a longbow for a reason.<br><br>If you do a cutout, this weakens the bow quite a bit, right at the most critical part. It requires a lot of skills and work to get that right.<br><br>Remember we are talking 120 lb. Most recurve bows with cutouts are made for 50lb, 60 tops. <br><br>Longbows have no cutout for the same reason.
     
  11. valkerie

    valkerie New Member

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    Wether an arrow is centershot or has to parallax around the handle makes no odds whatsoever to accuracy as long as the arrow has the correct spine (stiffness). Spine is measured by resting an arrow on two points a set/known distance apart then hanging a known weight from the center and measuring the deflection. Google wooden arrow spine. If your arrows are too weak then you will either break them when shot or actually be able to see them fishtailing downrange. If they are too stiff you will hear a wooden whacking sort of noise as you loose - this is part of the arrow (normally where the feathers are) hitting the riser of the bow.<br><br>Hope this helps