Angle grinder chainsaw blade

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by buckshot500, Feb 9, 2014.

  1. buckshot500

    buckshot500 Hoonigan Jeeper

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  2. Obl1v1Aus

    Obl1v1Aus Meh!

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    Ooooh! that could be cool. or if the chain links split a fatality waiting to happen:eek:
    I'd be hesitant to use that myself unless the grinder had a motor brake. I'd feel safer with a small chainsaw (not very good with a grinder to say the least)
     

  3. buckshot500

    buckshot500 Hoonigan Jeeper

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    I have used angle grinders for 30 years, so I'm comfortable with controlling how they cut materials.

    I would certainly want to have a guard in place, but don't see the chain snapping unless it caught a nail or something.

    A full sized chainsaw would be way overkill for shaping a slingshot though.
     
  4. Obl1v1Aus

    Obl1v1Aus Meh!

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    definitley a good guard is a must, when it comes to things spinning that fast though I try and avoid things with too many points of failure, i just had a quick look and found solid carving wheels that use a similar tooth system
    http://www.timbecon.com.au/assets/popup/productimages.aspx?ProductID=14140

    also I've seen a nylon abraisive brush in a drill to shape a smallish log into a very crude bowl, they work quite well from what it seems
     
  5. Lacumo

    Lacumo Member

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    I’ve used Kutzall rotary tool bits -- http://www.woodcraft.com/search2/search.aspx?query=kutzall -- and they’re monsters. They make wood disappear with amazing speed and cut total project time down like you won’t believe. I wouldn’t suggest using them on a small, lightweight rotary tool, though. These bits work hard and fast and I can see the possibility of them burning out a small, lightweight tool.

    I haven’t used one of those angle grinder chainsaw cutters, but I suspect they may not have the evenness and precision of the Kutzalls. In addition to that, you’d probably have to sharpen the teeth where with the Kutzalls, you just burn out any imbedded wood particles with a cigarette lighter or butane torch.
     
  6. ruthiexxxx

    ruthiexxxx ruthiexxxx

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    I've used an arbotech rotary gouge for years. They are a great...if somewhat scary, tool. They remove wood with great speed sending out a stream of woodchips hard enough to be worth avoiding.
    There are a number of versions including a miniature one which comes with an adaptor for the angle grinder.
    As a way of turning a really big fork into an SS they must be the quickest and easiest...especially if followed up with a doughnut like the one shown next to it. This has tungsden carbide grains sintered onto it and is also very effective and fast acting.
    I used to use these two for larger sculptures.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. buckshot500

    buckshot500 Hoonigan Jeeper

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    That looks like a much safer alternative, and I like that there is a protective washer that is bigger than the cutting blade. It won't cut into something unless it is tilted back first.


    These look promising for my flex shaft tool, if i can find where it is hiding in my attic.

    Thanks to both of you for posting these links, Both are better alternatives.
     
  8. buckshot500

    buckshot500 Hoonigan Jeeper

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    I have been wondering if there was a larger version of that sintered wheel. I used on once that was very small for a flex shaft and it was really controllable, yet removed material quickly.

    That rotary gouge does look pretty scary, but the one Obl1v1Aus posted is similar with that safety washer limiting how deeply it can cut something in a manner that was unintended.
     
  9. jurassicbark2000

    jurassicbark2000 jurassicbark2000

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    Wow did you see that miniature carving tool set on that page as well frigging awesome . There"s no way her indoors will let me have a chainsaw believe me i keep asking , but as i do have an angle grinder this could be something that i absolutely must have great find Cheers Martin
     
  10. Slagskimmer Mike

    Slagskimmer Mike thinks TBG smells better than roses

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    My father has one of those Lancelot cutters and he is happy with it, however he doesn't use it much.

    When I was employed production carving wood bears i used Arbortech wheels. The fancy ones with the 3 replaceable round carbide tooth inserts.

    For the best combination of safe + aggressive I can totally recommend them. The gullet behind the cutting insert limits the maximum depth of cut-per-tooth/per-revolution.
    Moving with the right feeds and speeds produces nice smooth surfaces, while very aggressive stock removal is also possible with pressure.

    Ruthie's cutter by the same company looks like it would be safer in the unfortunate event of nicking something metal. We know how carbide shatters easily, making those inserts into reealy hard shrapnel.:eek:

    Let us know what you end up with.