Aluminum and wood

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by JustAHobby, Jun 12, 2012.

  1. JustAHobby

    JustAHobby New Member

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    <strong>hey guys,<br>i have started to glue my new slingshot together from my scrap wood. it looks good so far <br>but i want to stabilize it with aluminum rods through the middle. i am wondering how to glue both together</strong> <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_scratch.png" alt="scratch" longdesc="33"><strong> - it should be a really tight fit so the slingshot wont break apart. i saw some really nice slingshots with aluminum parts in it and thought you could give me some tips (what type of glue/ how to glue and so on).<br><br>Thanks </strong> <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1">
     
  2. Ryan Wigglesworth

    Ryan Wigglesworth Senior Member

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    <div>Epoxy, strong epoxy, but superglue would be awesome also!</div><div class="clear"></div><div class="signature_div">
    <br><a href="http://voiceofquran.info/mp3_files/german_quran_mp3/001.mp3" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://voiceofquran.info/mp3_files/german_quran_mp3/001.mp3</a><br>my website! <a href="http://wigglesworthswoodwork.webs.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://wigglesworthswoodwork.webs.com/</a><br>For your spiritual well being ( more important than anything ) <a href="http://muttaqun.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://muttaqun.com/</a>
    </div>
     

  3. JustAHobby

    JustAHobby New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>Ryan Wigglesworth wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">Epoxy, strong epoxy, but superglue would be awesome also!</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"><br><br>mhhh i thought of epoxy, too but i read about some problems with the aluminum. I will probably use superglue or something like that. thanks</span>
     
  4. trobbie66

    trobbie66 New Member

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    <div>use a glue called Chair Doctor. If your pins are tight ,they will force out any adhesive as you insert them. Chair Dr is applied after assy. It acts on the wood and not the aluminium. It swells the wood cells and stabilises them thus locking in your pins with great mechanical force!! Very secure!You can order it online at leevalleytools.ca, or a similar type of adhesive should be available at fine woodworking shops. Post some pix</div><div class="clear"></div><div class="signature_div">
    <br>Trobbie66 <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_cheers.png" alt="cheers" longdesc="28">
    </div>
     
  5. JustAHobby

    JustAHobby New Member

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    <table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>trobbie66 wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">use a glue called Chair Doctor. If your pins are tight ,they will force out any adhesive as you insert them</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"> <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_biggrin.png" alt="Very Happy" longdesc="1"> Thanks, great advise- i think i will try it out if i can get this stuff <br></span><table width="90%" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" border="0" align="center">
    <tr><td><span class="genmed"><b>trobbie66 wrote:</b></span></td></tr>
    <tr><td class="quote">Post some pix</td></tr>
    </table>
    <span class="postbody"> <br>I will when its finished <img src="http://illiweb.com/fa/i/smiles/icon_razz.gif" alt="Razz" longdesc="9"></span>
     
  6. bullshot

    bullshot New Member

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    <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Mighty-Putty-MP1000-3-Pack/dp/B0018Z0QUK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1339612367&sr=8-1&keywords=mighty+putty" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.amazon.com/Mighty-Putty-MP1000-3-Pack/dp/B0018Z0QUK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1339612367&sr=8-1&keywords=mighty+putty</a> <br>this is so strong use it to make your entire slingshot and you can mold it how ever you want its that strong
     
  7. bnorman

    bnorman New Member

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    Well, I apologize if this post comes across like "Glue 101". But the subject came up, so I'll just toss this on the table for those who might be interested.<br><br>When using a third substance to permanently connect two dis-similar materials, and you have a choice of substance, it helps in the decision process to understand how those substances do their job.<br><br>Not all "glues" glue.<br><br>In this thread, three totally different "adhesion" techniques have been suggested. Wonderful! I will do my best to explain why they are totally different, and when each should be chosen.<br><br>Superglue welds. The strength comes from migrating molecules from each "glued" side to the other. For superglues you want the thinest possible layer between the two surfaces (minimizing dilution of migrating molecules), and you want to smush the two surfaces as close together as possible (minimizing transport distance). You are asking superglue to cross-migrate molecules so the two materials will bond mechanically, *creating* a weld. Two polished sheets of aluminum, for instance, will join as one. Two pieces of suede leather won't do so well. A piece of wood and a piece of metal will have difficulty bonding their differently-structured molecules.<br><br>Superglues are not gap-fillers. More is not better with superglues, because the superglue itself is not particularly strong. Therefore, you need to have "perfectly mated" surfaces (strongly-clamped together for sufficient time to allow as many molecules to migrate as possible) to achieve the strongest bond with superglue.<br><br>Epoxies, on the other hand, *provide* a mechanical bond. They are gap-fillers and indeed work best when the mating surfaces are rough or porous, giving much more area (nooks and crannies) to grip. Some epoxies are stronger than the material being bonded. However, epoxy "sets" (does not "dry") by exothermal chemical reaction (base + hardener). In this case, more is better (to a point, of course), because there is more epoxy to "set". Epoxies "set" better when heated. Epoxies might never set when applied very cold (no heat for the chemical process to activate).<br><br>Products like Chair Doctor don't "glue" items together. They expand the cellular structure to cause extreme pressure on the contact surface. Chair Doctor depends on cross-product friction between the surfaces. You do have to make sure that the material providing the hole is stronger than the material going into the hole, or Chair Doctor could expand the insert enought to split the hole (like ice expanding to break bottles). Chair Doctor won't cause two flat surfaces to adhere.<br><br>So, two similar smooth-surface materials face-to-face? Clamped superglue works great (but not actually waterproof, and acetone, vinegar, and nail polish can break the bond). Two dissimilar or rough-surface (or irregular surface) materials face-to-face, or rod-in-hole? Epoxy. But then again, expoy won't stick to *everything* (Ram-X and most Polyethelene plastics, for instance, shed epoxy like water). If you can rough up the face within a metal hole, and can reliably cause a wood insert to expand, then Chair Doctor will work on a friction base (just as friction holds your bands to your yoke or your pouch). Ironically, metal rods into a wood base probably would not be the best place to use Chair Doctor. The wood around the hole could expand "out" as much as "in", thus not gripping the metal rod tight enough. Chair Doctor's design is to apply the product to the part being inserted so the hole is filled by expansion of the insert.<br><br>bnorman