Shop Tricks

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by WildBill, Sep 7, 2014.

  1. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    Here's a thread for various shop tricks (BoyntonStu should have plenty to share here!). I'm still setting up things in mine but I thought I'd share this one...

    I prefer corded drills to battery ones, and I like to have two or three handy- one with a screwdriver bit, one with a counter sink and another for swapping bits and such. Well, I found that taking an old shoe that has the toe removed or just worn out and nailing the heel to my workbench makes for a great holster for my drill(s). With the toe gone I can just leave whatever bit in it and there's no issue.

    -Wild Bill
     

    Attached Files:

  2. TheNewSlingshotGuy

    TheNewSlingshotGuy AKA- "The Raccoon"

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    I'd say that's a "Shoe -In" for an ingenuity award! :D
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2014

  3. JimRhodo

    JimRhodo Junior Member

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    Thanks Bill

    After the thread I've just fled from (men with red lacquered nails) I turned to this one.

    Oh no not hair driers! Not for men.

    You haven't let me down. Practical resourceful shabby and tinged with age sweat and dirt. That's more like it. ;)
     
  4. Whittler

    Whittler New Member

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    Yeah I needed a dose of man shop as well! :)
     
  5. bigdh2000

    bigdh2000 Administrator

    I've been laughing about this all afternoon.
     
  6. dolomite

    dolomite Banned

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    My tips aren't so great but here we go.
    1. If you cut aluminum with a scrollsaw, don't use an aluminum or metal blade. Use a #7 ultra reverse wood blade, it cuts faster and cleaner and you can do the work of 5-6 ally blades with 1 ultra reverse.

    2. For those whom don't have a table saw, a circular saw can be used with a straight edge. Hold the saw blade up against a straight piece of
    wood with the table resting on said piece of wood. Place another piece of wood so its along side the saws table. Now measure the distance between the boards to accurately get the distance between blade and the edge of the saws table. Now simply add this number to the dimension you have to cut, clamp the straight edge down and make sure the table is always firmly against the straight edge and you will have true cuts.

    I may have more later but its late and I can't think well right now.
     
  7. bigdh2000

    bigdh2000 Administrator

    As Dolo said, use wood cutting saw blades in your powered saws to cut aluminum (all except the circular style saws). For the Bladerunner - the wood scroll saw blade works best with the speed adjusted to your style of cutting. For the scroll saw - any medium depth teeth wood blade will work but the ones that do both an up and down stroke cut are the best.

    The metal cutting blades just gum up with aluminum.
     
  8. CEZ

    CEZ New Member

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    I like this thread.

    You can get more life out of your gunked up sandpaper (belt sanders too) if you clean it with a steel brush.
     
  9. bigdh2000

    bigdh2000 Administrator

    An oscillating sander can save a lot of time with fine sanding (10,000 RPM or higher - available for about $20). Most stores carry 220 grit and some carry 320 grit for these round sanders. Whatever grit you use it is the equivalent of hand sanding at twice that grit. For example, 220 grit on the oscillating sander will be about as smooth as 400 grit by hand. You can use the edges of these sanders to get into all the small gaps as well. You can also dip your hand in water and wet the sandpaper to achieve a wet sanded finish.

    One word of caution, it takes a lot of strength to hold one of these sanders in one hand and the slingshot in the other. I never use a vice at this point since it leaves marks on the finished product.
     
  10. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    +1 on your suggestion #2, I was just doing that 2 weeks ago when I was building a form and needed some straight cuts but didn't want to dig the table saw out. It works really well.

    I would also add that using the proper blade in a circular or table saw is important too - using a crosscut blade on plywood, especially on nicer stuff like multiplex, will leave you with some nasty torn-up edges. A plywood blade is essential.
     
  11. bigdh2000

    bigdh2000 Administrator

    Wax/Polish finishes.

    A secret I learned over the past few years - use a loose stitch buffing wheel with the white polishing block to put an incredibly smooth finish on wood, resin, micarta and aluminum. On wood, this also brings out the natural colors of the grain without changing them. Oils and lacquer can cause the wood to change color a little. The polishing compound does not seem to have this effect. It is also wax based and seals the wood.

    You can use the same trick with furniture or car wax once applied and dry. It brings out a nice shine, especially when done on top of a lacquer coating.

    The buffing wheels can be purchased to fit just about any drill. If you have a bench grinder, one can be purchased for it as well.

    MAKE SURE THE WHEEL IS CLEAN AND NEW. Then only use that wheel for wood, resin or micarta. Once you use it for any metal, it goes black and the black transfers into the other materials, especially the wood.
     
  12. BoyntonStu

    BoyntonStu New Member

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    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xobwQpqOcO4&feature=gp-n-y&google_comment_id=z133vh0q2kjktrwuk223ydlreuv2wfain04[/ame]


    If you ever need to load something heavy.

    You might notice my 2 blue/black HD battery drills sitting in their holes drilled into a piece of plywood. I also have another plywood portable drill holder and a spring clip that I move around the shop and I clip it to any nearby surface. Very handy.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2014
  13. CEZ

    CEZ New Member

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    Argh.. I just bought an impact drill, it was a close battle between that and an oscillating sander and I decided on the impact drill since I screw a lot and try to avoid sanding because I don't have proper ventilation. Next year I guess.
     
  14. bigdh2000

    bigdh2000 Administrator

    Resins:

    Sometimes referred to as Clear Casting Resin or Clear Casting Epoxy. You get what you pay for, so here is a rule of thumb.

    As the price increases the following happens:
    -Smell goes down, with less smell after curing as well.
    -Less bubbles in the finished product.
    -Longer cure times possible.
    -Approaches crystal clear (less cloudiness and color tinges)
    -More tolerant to post cast polishing and sanding.

    Tricks to casting resin:
    -Always peel away the form, do not pry the cast out of the form.
    -Silicone shapes used in baking pans work well as forms.
    -PlayDoh works very well as a form but yields a cloudy colored surface that must be sanded away.
    -A vacuum chamber works well for removing bubbles. See below for my vacuum chamber setup.

    Polishing Resin Castings:
    -Wet sand up to 12,000 grit followed by resin polish being wiped on and hand rubbed with a smooth cloth.
    -If the resin is higher end, you can use the loose cloth polishing wheel technique mentioned above. Just make sure to cool the resin cast regularly so it does not melt. Also, if you get it too hot, it will push the polish into the hot surface and leave you needing to sand all over again.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2014
  15. WildBill

    WildBill The Silly Song Guy

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    I use a square oscillating sander so that I can fit 600+ wet sand paper onto it. If your sander has dust collection, be sure NOT to puncture the paper with the punch template when doing wet sanding or else your sander will completely gum up.

    -Wild Bill
     
  16. Withak

    Withak aka Whitehawk!

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    Safety tips are good too:

    1. We've already discussed it before, but like good safety tips do, it bears repeating. Don't wear gloves when working with a power tool.
    2. When cutting with a blade, always carve at your buddy, not your body.
    3. Use safety glasses/goggles any time you're drilling, cutting, routing, etc.
    4. Hearing protection is also a good idea, depending on the task you're performing.
    5. When working with power tools, never get in a hurry. I know too many people with missing fingers or parts of fingers - and each one attributes that loss to a lack of focus or rushing a job. It's actually disturbing how many people I know that have lost fingers to power tools.
    6. From the electrician in me: never use a power tool where it's wet unless you're connected through a GFCI (ground fault interrupter) - if you don't have a GFCI receptacle, you can get GFCI modules that plug into an extension cord. Be sure to periodically check your tools' power cords for damage, and if you suspect an issue, test it for grounding issues (I can tell you how to do this if it ever comes up).
     
  17. bigdh2000

    bigdh2000 Administrator

    Vacuum Chamber:

    Large diameter PVC coupling, 1/8" pipe thread tap, 1/8" threaded brass pipe fitting, 1/8" to 1/4" threaded brass pipe converter, two sheets of rubber, at least one sheet of 1/8" or more thick plexiglass, something smooth for the bottom (another plexiglass sheet or a piece of sheet metal will work).

    Lastly, a vacuum pump - Car A/C vacuum pump is best and has a 1/4" coupling on the hoses that come with it. Sold for about $100 at Harbor Freight Tools.

    I already had the pump for some car A/C work and the thread tap from some other work. The rest costs about $15 USA.

    I got fancy and put on a valve in case I needed to close it off. Turned out to be a waste of money. The attached pictures should let you sort out how it is assembled. Feel free to ask questions.
     

    Attached Files:

  18. TheNewSlingshotGuy

    TheNewSlingshotGuy AKA- "The Raccoon"

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    You could pad the jaws of the vice with some foam rubber! (Or a cut up Yoga Block) this will conform to the shape of your SS in the vice and hold it steady without marring the surface. Hope this helps!
     
  19. TheNewSlingshotGuy

    TheNewSlingshotGuy AKA- "The Raccoon"

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    You worded that funny. :)