Bandsaw or Scroll Saw

Discussion in 'General Slingshot Discussions' started by pasquale, Oct 14, 2017.

  1. pasquale

    pasquale Member

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    Hi guys,

    I haven´t posted anything since a long time, but right now I have some more free time and I am building some slingshot and other jobs.
    In my holidays I have earned some money and I wanted to buy me a new tool for my Workshop. At the moment the only power tool I have is a jig saw.
    I wanted to buy a scroll saw or a bandsaw? Do you have any tips or suggestions which is better for building slingshot and some other stuff?
    At the moment I think a bandsaw is better, because when I work on a natural fork or some thicker multiplex I think a scroll saw is the better choice.
    I hope you can give me some suggestions or tips.
    And for sure I will show you some of my slingshots in future. ;)

    Thanks
     

  2. BeMahoney

    BeMahoney Builder of things

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    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E6N9KQJRXnM[/ame]
     
  3. Flipgun

    Flipgun Active Member

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    I have used a jigsaw upright and turned over. I have a BladeRunner and am on my 3rd or 4th scroll saw. So if you have the room and can buy a good sized band? Go for it! It will pay you to learn to sharpen one and to some folks (me) they are scary as hell. But with that said: I would have one if I had the money and the room.
     
  4. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    I have both and I much prefer my scroll saw. It allows me to do very tight curves and it cuts with extreme precision. Exchanging saw blades is easy and cheap. On the band saw, exchanging blades is a pain in the behind and they cost serious money. Just one nail in a piece of wood and bye bye blade.

    Funny, for me only the very coarse scroll saw blades work. The fine toothed blades, I can't do a straight cut, no matter what material I use.

    My scroll saw can do 7 cm wood and I have cut 8mm aluminum plates, no problem.

    So for me, the scroll saw it is.
     
  5. NamenloserHeld91

    NamenloserHeld91 Senior Member

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    I can finish a rambone (without sanding) under one houer with a band saw. Like the caiptain said a new blaid cost about 20 eusen.
     
  6. BeMahoney

    BeMahoney Builder of things

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    We here in Germany, we're blessed with
    "Werkzeug Prüver" and some other saw band
    vendors..
    If the saw is bought according to the band length,
    so that the bands you need have a common length,
    then a decent band costs only around five Euros:

    https://weltweitwerkzeug.net/product/view/3393795/2480769

    That offer is for 5 bands - for not even 24 Euros..

    And if one manages to avoid that one fatal nail Jörg
    mentioned, such a band lasts for a long time - for each
    tooth shares its work with so many others - here it's
    1,40 meters or 330 teeth..
     
  7. pasquale

    pasquale Member

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    Thanks for your answers.

    Yesterday I went to the hardware store and the shop assistant told me that the scroll saw is only usable for cutting wood, which is thinner than 2 cm. So I thought for some thicker multiplex or natural forks a scroll saw is not usable. But if Joerg says he can cut with his scroll saw thicker wood, I think I will choose a scroll saw.
    Do you have any models, which you would recommend? Is it enough to buy a beginner model? @Joerg which model are you using? At the moment I tend to the Scheppach SD1600V LED Dekupiersäge.
     
  8. seppman

    seppman Folding-Ladder Expert

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    The answer to your question is: yes.
    Buy a bandsaw? Yes. Buy a scrollsaw? Yes.
     
  9. BeMahoney

    BeMahoney Builder of things

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    The most important point Jörg made is that he's always working with the coarsest (gröbstes) sawblade.

    It's never the "saw" that cuts.. it's the blade!

    Regarding the fact that the saw mostly is used to rough out the shape, the slickness of the surface the blade produces is irrelevant..

    I'd put some money into high class, coarse blades - if the person operating the saw is smart enough to give the machine the time it needs to remove the material, any scrollsaw is just fine! - A better saw will do the job faster, probably, but any saw will finally succeed!
     
  10. bigdh2000

    bigdh2000 Administrator

    This is like the question do you prefer shooting flat bands or tubes. There is no right answer. I have both and use each for different tasks. However, I use the bandsaw a lot more since much of my work with saws it removing large portions of materials. I then use very coarse sanding devices to bring everything in close. It is all preference in the end.
     
  11. pasquale

    pasquale Member

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    Thanks for all your answers. When I have chosen a saw, I will update you
     
  12. seppman

    seppman Folding-Ladder Expert

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    I've got the Proxxon Jörg mentioned. Does it's job. If you are looking for a really high quality scrollsaw, check out "Hegner Multicut" (and don't be surprised about the price). :)
     
  13. ffoowwlleerr

    ffoowwlleerr Makery and Mischief

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    Band saw because you can not only cut out slingshots but also make Laminate if you get the right band saw with a big throat or an extension.
     
  14. pasquale

    pasquale Member

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    So I have bought the Proxxon Scroll Saw, like Joerg has.
    After my first tests I noticed, that it needs some practice to do precise cuts
     
  15. JoergS

    JoergS Administrator

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    Just make sure you use the coarse saw blades. Anything finer than coarse, no straight cuts ever.
     
  16. pasquale

    pasquale Member

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    Ok thanks for the tip
     
  17. chilihook

    chilihook Junior Member

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    I would go with a bandsaw. While a scroll saw can make the tight curves that Joerg mentions, they are pretty much a one-trick pony. A bandsaw allows you to do many different things like resawing wood, cut thicker pieces of wood, and work incredibly accurately if your saw is well tuned. If you need to make a tighter radius curve, you can get a thinner blade. Yes, they are a little more expensive than scroll saw blades, but they last a good, long time.